How I am finally convinced to try out English riding.
 
 

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How I am finally convinced to try out English riding.

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        08-26-2013, 01:41 PM
      #1
    Started
    How I am finally convinced to try out English riding.

    This is how I finalized my thoughts of trying out English. I have been thinking about it for a long time - but now I am going to try it for real.

    A few days ago we had our fair and I went on this trail obstacle course.
    Well, everything went nice and well - so I will just skip to the best part of the trail course.
    The pool noodles "trees." The closest noodle to the ground was at least two and a half feet - the second one was three feet, and the third one was four feet from the ground. Well, Brisco, my horse, wasn't convinced that six inches was enough space to go through. (the noodles moved and I showed him, but he still wasn't convinced.) Well, he started backing up and he stopped backing when he was about two feet away from the noodles. All his weight I started drifting to his haunches and I told the guide - I am almost positive this guy is going to jump these. Sure enough, he clear two of the three pool noodles from just two feet away at a stand still. If I knew when he was going to jump then I would have not yanked my arm out of my socket, haha!! (kidding!)

    Well, at the boarding place they have an arena and a round pen. The step into the round pen is at least a foot high. I always like to go across that at a walk and trot and jump over it into the round pen. I also set up logs she has in there into little mini jumps that have enough room to lope around and over. But they are just like four inches high - but enough for him to be asked to do little mini-jumps over.
    I enjoy jumping and Brisco has shown me that he will jump when I ask him to and even when I don't. So far he hasn't slowed before doing our mini jumps but instead likes to speed up.

    I know someone who says she has tons of english saddles - so I was thinking about asking her if I could buy or rent one.

    I know a little bit about english - enough to get started anyways. I know how to jump and how to do the form, the trickier part is knowing exactly when to get up - but on our foot jump I usually get that good. Sometimes a little too soon or late though, but I do get up a little.

    I was just wondering a little more about english riding? Like how a saddle should fit and just any tips. I am a beginner at English. Just anything right now would be great and very helpful. I will ask more questions as I think of some. Thanks!!
         
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        08-26-2013, 01:49 PM
      #2
    Showing
    You need an instructor if you want to learn to jump correctly. Believing you 'know' the form doesn't mean you actually do, especially if you have no clue how to ride properly in an English saddle.

    Not all English riding involves jumping, either. Not sure why non-English riders think that.
    kitten_Val, tinyliny, bsms and 4 others like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 02:05 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    Not all English riding involves jumping, either. Not sure why non-English riders think that.
    I think the jumping is where her inspiration is coming from, because let's be honest, it is a lot of fun.

    Amberly, I recommend doing some dressage, too. It's where a lot of your good English basics will come from, even if you don't plan on staying with dressage, it will help you later down the road, and definitely find someone who can help you!
         
        08-26-2013, 02:06 PM
      #4
    Showing
    Just to add to what SR already said... If you will be looking for english saddle, make sure it'll fit your horse and you before buying it (unless you find a super deal so you can re-sell it easily). Do some research on saddle fit (you can find some threads here, and videos on youtube). Fitting english saddle can be tricky, and can cause harm in long run, so don't underestimate it.
    Speed Racer, Corporal and amberly like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 02:07 PM
      #5
    Trained
    Jumping with a horse is much riskier than not jumping. How much depends on what set of statistics you choose to accept, but the studies I've seen indicate 10-40 times greater chance of head injury (that is a 1,000-4,000% increase).

    That doesn't mean folks shouldn't jump, but a prudent person would minimize their risk by taking lessons from a good instructor.

    As mentioned, lots of English riders do not jump. There are a lot of things to enjoy about English riding that don't involve jumping. But if you do decide to jump, the 55 year old Dad & Granddad in me strongly recommends getting lessons from someone good. A single fall, even with a helmet, can change your life for the worse.
    Speed Racer and Ripplewind like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 02:07 PM
      #6
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BornToRun    
    I think the jumping is where her inspiration is coming from, because let's be honest, it is a lot of fun.
    Not all the horses are willing (or even safe) to jump. That's also something to consider.
    Ripplewind and amberly like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 02:13 PM
      #7
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    Not all the horses are willing (or even safe) to jump. That's also something to consider.

    Exactly, Val.

    Conny simply wouldn't jump, and Casper gets too ramped up if you ask him to jump higher than he should. JJ's kind of lazy, so while he's not a dangerous jumper, he's not exactly going to set the world on fire with his talent.

    As far as jumping being 'fun', meh. I only jump when I absolutely have to. I've never considered it the end-all, be-all of riding. Your mileage may vary.
    amberly likes this.
         
        08-26-2013, 02:35 PM
      #8
    Foal
    I would talk to an instructor if you can. Someone else mentioned dressage, and even if you don't have the tack, try to incorporate some techniques in your riding. I've thought about it to riding as ballet is to dance - teaches the basics of good form, etc, even if some people find it boring. (I loved both haha!)

    Start only on the flat when you get a saddle that fits. Haste makes waste, and you want a quality seat and leg before moving to jumping things. If you get bored, use ground poles or practice dressage tests or buy a pattern book.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    bsms, BornToRun and amberly like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 02:54 PM
      #9
    Showing
    Jumping and jumping properly are two different things. You have no idea what your position is like over a fence unless you have photos or video to reference. There's also a huge difference between loping a few 1' "jumps" and setting up correctly to a fence or course.
    Take lessons from a qualified professional.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-26-2013, 03:25 PM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amberly    
    I know a little bit about english - enough to get started anyways. I know how to jump and how to do the form, the trickier part is knowing exactly when to get up - but on our foot jump I usually get that good. Sometimes a little too soon or late though, but I do get up a little.
    Do you have any pictures of you 'in form'? A lot of the time you may think you are doing it the correct way when really you're not. It takes a lot of time to get the balance. Basically, all of your weight should be in the balls of your feet, heels down. You should be able to do this without having to use your hands for balance. Before jumping anything you should be able to trot and canter in the 2 point position easily without losing balance and without using your hands to balance. The reason for this is a lot of people will clip their horses mouths because they are using their hands for balance and not releasing when they should be.

    Knowing when to 'get up' shouldn't be a conscious effort, it should happen by feel. It's hard to explain but you and your horse should kind of 'meet'. This takes awhile to get the feel for so in the beginning once you have you balance in 2 point at trot and canter, whenever you approach a jump or mini jump or whatever, the minute you aim your horse at that obstacle you should be in your 2 point. This allows you to prepare yourself properly and lessens the chance of hurting your horse by 'getting up too late'

    I STRONGLY recommend getting a good instructor before doing anymore jumping. You will very easily sour your horse and potentially cause injury to yourself and your horse without proper instruction.
    Ripplewind and amberly like this.
         

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