How long should I take lessons before getting a horse? - Page 4
 
 

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How long should I take lessons before getting a horse?

This is a discussion on How long should I take lessons before getting a horse? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
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    03-13-2012, 08:59 AM
  #31
Showing
As a teen I rode horses of every description from a 13 hh stocky part Welsh to a huge Belgian. They ran the full gamit of dispositions. Mostly I rode OTTBs since there was a big racetrack nearby. By the time I was 18 I could handle anything a horse could dish out. I desperately wanted my own horse but had I gotten one, in hindsight, I learned far more than I would have if restricted to one horse. Horses are retrainiable and when you become a skillful rider you will be less concerned about a prospective horse's training and can focus on his conformation and health.
     
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    03-13-2012, 01:34 PM
  #32
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetsAB    
Seriously? Seriously!? Since when are short horses easier to ride and easier to handle? The height of a horse does not effect either of these. What a crock of poop.



Canadienne...Welcome to the forum! You should make sure that you are comfortable on a wide variety of lesson horses before even thinking about purchasing. Even before purchasing, you might want to consider leasing a horse (similar to a car lease) to make sure that you can carry the cost and time commitment of horse ownership.

The more horses you can ride and learn on now, can make a big difference to your overall riding skills. With multiple horses, you learn to ride each horse as an individual, and understand how to apply different skills to different horses.

I have been taking lessons for 4 (or so) years at my current barn, with lessons before that during high school (2 years?). I am only just to the point where I *think* it is time for my own horse. The difference between even now and last year is being able to be much more of a rider, and less of a passenger.

You may get to that point sooner, or later, but it is something that you should discuss with your coach. But please be willing to take your time, and do not just jump into horse ownership right away. Take the time to learn, and to be educated. Read books. Lots of books. Take everything with a grain of salt, because no two ways are the absolute same. Take in clinics, and watch other people ride and coach. Sometimes another coach will say something different then your own, and that's what will make "skill" click in your head, for you to apply it to yourself. Remember that riding is a lifelong learning process, and there is always something more to learn.
thats why so many 17 hand horses do barrel racing and reining events ? Sorry but you know not of what you speak.
     
    03-13-2012, 02:02 PM
  #33
Weanling
^^^ They don't do well in barrel or reining because the longer legs make it harder to do those sharp turns. Horses lower to the ground will naturally be able to make tighter turns and spins quicker because of their lower center of gravity. It's like asking why you don't drive a lifted jeep in NASCAR. Apples and Oranges.

That being said... To OP, I'm a tall horse girl myself. I like them 16hh or bigger. My gelding is 16.2 and I love him. He is very easy for me to ride. A little hard to get up on but I just have to keep in shape so I am able to mount up as easily as possible. Good motivation to stay fit.

I didn't have a single lesson before I got my first horse. Mine was an OTTB that was given to me by my grandfather. However, my father-in-law, has ridden his whole life and was there to give him a test ride in the round pen before I took off on him. I've learned as I've gone along. Comic has learned right along with me. "A lot of wet saddle blankets" is what my FIL told me. We took a few lessons about a year after I got him but other than that it's just been trial and error and listening to advice from others.

Be patient as you try to find the right horse. I think you could start looking now if you wanted. Ask your trainer to help you look at horses. I think it's good for a person to learn with the horse they own. Nothing wrong with lesson horses it's just a different kind of bond with your own. But take your time and look at lots of options. When you find the "right" horse, that you and your trainer agree is the one, buy it. Doesn't matter if you are 2 weeks or 2 years into lessons IMO.
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    03-13-2012, 02:37 PM
  #34
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
thats why so many 17 hand horses do barrel racing and reining events ? Sorry but you know not of what you speak.
Perhaps you might want to evaluate that statement for how it might apply to yourself?
The height issue in relation to participation in those events has nothing to do with how easy they are to handle or ride and everything to do with the fact that their lower center of gravity and heightened ability for tight maneuverability making them more suitable for those activities.
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