How to stop bouncing in a trot? HELP! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 01-09-2014, 05:02 PM Thread Starter
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Question How to stop bouncing in a trot? HELP!

Okay, so my horse died last month. She was very smooth and we have one other riding horse who is very, very, bumpy in a trot and gallop. My parents are mad at me for wanting another smoother horse and think I should just deal with the horse we have. How do I stop bouncing when I ride her? I ride because it is relaxing and gives me time to think and enjoy myself and let everything out, not to get a concussion. It is not enjoyable for me to ride her because of her gait. I stand in the stirrups, I relax but do not slouch, I am more straight, I try to move with the horse which I did a very good job of with my other horse but this one is really hard to move with? Help me please!!!!
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post #2 of 13 Old 01-09-2014, 05:05 PM
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Do you know post? Rise and fall with the horse's steps. You will be much better off posting if the horse has a rough trot than trying to sit it.
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post #3 of 13 Old 01-09-2014, 05:08 PM
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Have you ever had formal lessons where proper technique on how to sit a trot was taught?

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post #4 of 13 Old 01-09-2014, 06:20 PM
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I'm going through something similar. I had a QH mare but she had a shorter stride and was really easy to sit her trot and canter. I tried lessons with another horse too that is a barrel horse and that helped a bit but I really needed more practice. The tough part was I needed my lessons with me and my personal horse. I ended up having to part with that horse which is heartbreaking due to her need for a dry lot which I can't provide :( Now I have a mustang and he's such a good boy but his trot is difficult though his canter is better. Still different than my mare though. I feel like I'm learning all over again. Its frustrating and though I ride for many of the same reasons as you, I do want to take on this challenge as I want to be able to ride different types of horses which I feel will improve my riding.

I do post his bigger trot but try to sit whenever I can. (On the bright side my gelding helps me practice posting much easier than my mare did since her movement was smaller so it was hard to feel the beats to post!) I slow him down and try to focus on my seat and moving my hips in rhythm with him. I tried to focus on this movement first at the walk intentionally and then trot. I have a long way to go as we don't trot often since he's only 4 and we are working on a lot. But we are slowly getting there and I'm sure you will too if you decide you want to pursue this. Though I certainly understand wanting a smoother horse to so no judgement :)
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post #5 of 13 Old 01-09-2014, 06:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebonyisforme View Post
Okay, so my horse died last month. She was very smooth and we have one other riding horse who is very, very, bumpy in a trot and gallop. My parents are mad at me for wanting another smoother horse and think I should just deal with the horse we have. How do I stop bouncing when I ride her? I ride because it is relaxing and gives me time to think and enjoy myself and let everything out, not to get a concussion. It is not enjoyable for me to ride her because of her gait. I stand in the stirrups, I relax but do not slouch, I am more straight, I try to move with the horse which I did a very good job of with my other horse but this one is really hard to move with? Help me please!!!!
Just a speculation, but I'd guess you had a gaited horse and now you don't.

Posting is the easiest thing in order to avoid bouncing at a trot (and it's easier on the horse too...bouncing is as unpleasant for their back as it is for you).

If you don't know how to post I'd suggest finding someone that can teach you how. It's not difficult (providing you know how to get "in sync" with your horse's movement at the trot). Generally you can learn how and master the mechanics of it in one lesson. Practice will make you better at it.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #6 of 13 Old 01-09-2014, 08:21 PM
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If your parents can't pay for lessons for you to learn to post, you could do one of two things:

1. Watch some instructional Youtube videos on posting.

2. Sit the trot, take your feet out of the stirrups and learn to sit back on your seat; I'd bet money you are way over working your legs/knees/ankles when you don't have to. Also, slow her down to a jog if her trot is that rough

Once you master the trot, then move on to the canter

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post #7 of 13 Old 01-10-2014, 01:22 AM
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Heels down, weight in your butt, and squeeze with your thighs. This will help to anchor you to your saddle. Also, keeping a tight core will keep you from swaying too much which will also help you keep a seated trot since swaying could unsettle your seat.

Some horses however, just have trots impossible to sit and for that, there's something called posting :)

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post #8 of 13 Old 01-10-2014, 04:52 AM
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If what I'm about to say makes sense, then I have successfully woken up (sitting in my morning class ATM)

When a horse is in trot, the front legs(forget the back legs and bear with me xD) move opposite to each other, IE. One is forward while the other is back. When you're sitting in the saddle, and I actually find this easier with a bouncier horse as you move much more and it helps you learn, move your hips with his shoulders. What I mean is when his right leg is forward, tilt/turn your right hip to follow that leg. Vice-versa with the other leg/hip. It sounds very strange and isn't actually correct, but once you get the hang of it you can figure out how much give you need to give with your hips to match the horses stride without looking like you're using a hoopla-hoop, and from the ground you look much better and smoother!

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Last edited by ShaynadhMarzer; 01-10-2014 at 04:53 AM. Reason: correcting information
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post #9 of 13 Old 01-10-2014, 01:54 PM
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I've learned to be comfy sitting the trot by first leaning way back without stirrups and holding onto the saddle blanket (or horn if you have a western saddle). At first you have to lean waaaay back, but as you get the rhythm and get more balanced, you'll be able to sit forward. It's actually harder to be balanced with the stirrups on!

Also practice posting to the trot without stirrups. You can alternate between sitting and posting the trot without stirrups and that will help you get comfy doing it in stirrups and sitting all the time.

“When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes. ” ~ William Shakespeare
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post #10 of 13 Old 01-10-2014, 08:28 PM
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If you can have riding lessons then this is the best thing you can do to adjust to your new horse!
If not, perhaps try doing some pilates or yoga- this will help to relax your muscles and strengthen your core. Once your core becomes stronger, you will slowly improve at the sitting trot, and you'll find it much easier to sit into your horse's movement. Bareback will certainly help your balance and position!
Alternatively if you feel like she is rushing, and this is where her movement becomes bumpy and uncomfortable, it may be worth getting a vet or equine chiropractor to have a look at her, just to check over her back and tack etc. :)
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