I can't stay on my new horse! Any ideas? - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

I can't stay on my new horse! Any ideas?

This is a discussion on I can't stay on my new horse! Any ideas? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        04-04-2011, 10:08 PM
      #21
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OffAgainOnAgain    
    Thanks for all the replies. It's just really frustrating because she has no respect for me! She treats me like she does geldings in the field. Like a nobody. I've tried a join up before and it turned into a stand off between the two of us because neither of us would back down and I never ever want to put her in a situation in which she feels she needs to rear and she kept facing me about backing up and I was afraid that was where it was going.
    This is your answer then.

    Before she will EVER respect you fully undersaddle you NEED to gain her respect from the ground.

    Arabians are a very intelligent, sensitive breed...creating a horse that can be both a joy and a pain to be around, depending on how you take to their nature. She now knows that she is the leader in your relationship and everything you do together will be wrapped around that, and thus will be a struggle for you in particular.

    Go back to the bare bones basics, and start gaining her respect; start simple. Maybe begin with exercises like yielding her hip, or getting her to back up out of your space, and to stay out of your space until you invite her in. There are MANY different methods to choose from, so I would suggest that you start searching through some of the training threads here, and see if there is one in particular that strikes your fancy, and see if we can't help you through it.

    You may need to find a different trainer to help you through these ground work phases as well, especially since this current one seems to be focused on the riding aspect, which is not what this horse needs right now, nor do you.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        04-05-2011, 12:26 AM
      #22
    Foal
    So I've been taking a little bit of every ones advice. I went out to do a lunging session (I can't ride for another week because of a dislocated shoulder), and with the help of my teams coach (not my typical trainer) I feel like we got somewhere. She worked on my body language while I was lunging and then I put her on a long lead and we worked on 'my space, not yours'. After she got the idea that she couldn't invade on my area, I took her in the round pen. She got the idea that if I turned my back to her, she could follow me, but when I turned around and walked towards her the right idea was to get out of my space.

    It was amazing putting her back into her stall. She didn't bully me to get in the door, and even when I went in to feed her she didn't snap at me like she sometimes does. She stood with her head down waiting until I went to give her a scratch.
    Now that she has a little more respect and I'm not at risk of being eaten or trampled on the ground, I'm going out again tomorrow to have a 'Twilight Day'. She loves water and it's pretty hot here so she'll get a nice long grooming and a bath so she doesn't think I'm a big bully that is out to get her.

    As to some of the Arabian and crop stories, I learned very early on that Arabians do NOT respond to a smack with a crop the same way TB's do. In fact, I haven't even seen my crop in like 4 weeks since the first time I used it on Twilight and she threw us both into the fence in a angry panic.

    I totally agree that it needs to be a partnership, not me bullying her or bossing, but I also know from experience that she isn't looking at it as a partnership yet. She thinks she is around to bully me.

    She is now on a strict 'You only get treats if you do something awesome, otherwise your reward is a scratch and pat'. I've learned she can't handle treats because she will follow me around and nip at my hands and back pockets for hours even if I just give her one.

    Someone mentioned bareback, and I think it's an awesome idea. My friend on my equestrian team has a retired broodmare who loves to be ridden, but they don't use a saddle on because she's getting older. She's a big QH sweetheart and I'm going out next week to ride her and just work on my balance without a saddle.

    This is the longest reply ever and I have an exam tomorrow….
    Anyway. I'll keep you all updated because the moral support/advice is making this whole situation ten times easier. Because she is super talented. She free jumps in the indoor when I set her loose 4 foot easily and I just can't wait until her training is done and I can even think about jumping on her. And when I say free jump, I mean she canters around and just does it for fun, no urging from me.

    All I can say is going from TB to Arabian is like learning a different language. I need a professional translator!
         
        04-05-2011, 08:45 AM
      #23
    Started
    Glad to hear that so far it is going well!
         
        04-05-2011, 09:26 AM
      #24
    jdw
    Weanling
    I can certainly identify!! I had ridden for years, and then stopped for a long while. Starting back up with buying horses, and getting thrown, one reared with me, one would run away. After just a few times, I lost all confidence and didn't know where to turn. I have to say the folks on here are right, from my experience. It took lots of ground work, and there are still days when something starts to turn and I get a panicked feeling all over me!! The ground work is a wonderful tool for making it better for you, I believe. Plus, you will figure out this horse much quicker~whether its behavioral or something else; and how to address it. Addressing bad behavior can feel empowering!! I don't know about you, but I am not a spring chicken anymore and don't baounce nearly as good as I used to!! (Plus, I don't WANT TO bounce anymore!!) Take Care and let us know what works for you!!
         
        04-05-2011, 08:45 PM
      #25
    Trained
    That's why I do alot of groundwork with every horse I ride or train; I don't like to bounce!!! Lol!!! Preparation, preparation, preparation...even if it's just a matter of YOU gaining your confidence in handling the animal back, take the time that you need to prepare yourself and the horse for the next ride, so it goes WELL, not just you getting on and "hoping to god" that you don't fall off!
         
        04-05-2011, 10:39 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OffAgainOnAgain    
    All I can say is going from TB to Arabian is like learning a different language. I need a professional translator!
    This comment is incredibly accurate and insightful, even just getting to the stage where you recognise that is half the battle, the rest is just learning and experience! Sounds like you are on the right track, you'll be fine.

    She sounds like a wonderful horse....would love to see pictures....
         
        04-07-2011, 07:04 PM
      #27
    Foal
    twigal2 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
    twigal1 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    That's my gal.

    So I'm pretty sure she tried to eat me the other day. I was really sick and I decided to take a lesson on one of my coaches school ponies Orion just because I wasn't feeling up to doing any training myself on Twilight. Anyway, I felt bad and decided to go give her a nice long grooming and it was going great.
    She let me brush her tail (which is horrifying right now. It was chewed off.) without swishing my to death or trying to kick, and she let me hold her face down to brush her and everything. This all happened in the stall, no cross ties or anything. She was being an angel. I have no idea what happens to her as soon as you're in the saddle. I'm considering having another saddler come out and look at her because a horse that sweet on the ground cannot just turn into such a horror to ride... Or are some horses just like that?

    Anyway. Grooming went great! Of course I forgot that I had used some peppermint scented body wash I have. And all of a sudden she spins, does a 180 to face me, and aggressively begins licking any visible skin she can find. I didn't want to move and scare her, but I was sure she was going to bite my face. I give her credit. She did this for a good 15 minutes and never once bit me.
    But in my mind I could have sworn she was going to lay on top of me and just take a bite.

    But back to serious questions again. Like I said before, how can such a sweet horse be such a pain to ride? Should I have someone else fit her for a saddle again? Can that really make a horse buck like a bronco?

    Anyway.I'm still not feeling awesome, so I think this weekend I'm going to take her in the indoor and play with her. I usually do a join-up, work on standing still, and then run around and she pops over crossrails behind me. Other boarders think I'm crazy, but she seems to have fun.
         
        04-08-2011, 05:54 PM
      #28
    Started
    Hey there - I think another opinion on saddle fit is well in order. Also the work you are doing on the ground with her is great. Work on round pen and longing as well and really get her in shape, while eventually treating her as if you are saddle breaking her for the first time - like suggested earlier. Sit on her and get off and give her praise. Eventually she'll be bored with being sat on and want to do more. :)

    Glad on the ground things are going so well! Keep up the awesome work and can't wait to hear more updates. I'm super sick too so I feel your pain!
         
        04-13-2011, 08:00 PM
      #29
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OffAgainOnAgain    
    twigal2 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
    twigal1 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    That's my gal.

    So I'm pretty sure she tried to eat me the other day. I was really sick and I decided to take a lesson on one of my coaches school ponies Orion just because I wasn't feeling up to doing any training myself on Twilight. Anyway, I felt bad and decided to go give her a nice long grooming and it was going great.
    She let me brush her tail (which is horrifying right now. It was chewed off.) without swishing my to death or trying to kick, and she let me hold her face down to brush her and everything. This all happened in the stall, no cross ties or anything. She was being an angel. I have no idea what happens to her as soon as you're in the saddle. I'm considering having another saddler come out and look at her because a horse that sweet on the ground cannot just turn into such a horror to ride... Or are some horses just like that?

    Anyway. Grooming went great! Of course I forgot that I had used some peppermint scented body wash I have. And all of a sudden she spins, does a 180 to face me, and aggressively begins licking any visible skin she can find. I didn't want to move and scare her, but I was sure she was going to bite my face. I give her credit. She did this for a good 15 minutes and never once bit me.
    But in my mind I could have sworn she was going to lay on top of me and just take a bite.

    But back to serious questions again. Like I said before, how can such a sweet horse be such a pain to ride? Should I have someone else fit her for a saddle again? Can that really make a horse buck like a bronco?

    Anyway.I'm still not feeling awesome, so I think this weekend I'm going to take her in the indoor and play with her. I usually do a join-up, work on standing still, and then run around and she pops over crossrails behind me. Other boarders think I'm crazy, but she seems to have fun.
    Yes, many sweet horses can be a pain to ride. And from the things you have said, like her aggressively licking you, she doesn't sound all that sweet on the ground either. I think you are letting your emotions cloud your judgement, and you are humanizing your horse. Not that there's anything necessarily wrong with that, as long as you recognize that's what you're doing. Your mare is getting mixed signals from you, and grooming her in her stall with no halter and giving her any treats from hand, and doing joining up when your trainer is teaching you body language is all undoing everything you accomplished from your training sessions. I have learned this lesson the hard way, when one day a fairly aggressive colt who I had been working with for a few months pinned me to the wall with his butt when I reprimanded him for trying to bite me in his stall. This could easily happen to you, and I think you should talk to your trainer about what you should and should not do. IMO, When you are earning a horses respect, that comes first and bonding comes after the respect is there. You should always groom your mare while she's tied, and should lunge her the same way every day, and provide the consistency to make the ground work stick. A horse that sees themselves as boss will invade your space and lick you. A submissive horse would never do that. Just because she likes you doesn't mean she respects you.
         
        04-13-2011, 11:25 PM
      #30
    Foal
    She sure is pretty though, holy moly!!! You can practically see the intelligence oozing off of her
         

    Tags
    buck, bucking, falling off, horse, scared

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    How to stay on a horse AtheistForever Horse Riding 21 06-28-2010 08:31 PM
    How did you train your horse to stay on the rail? Citrus Horse Riding 16 06-22-2010 01:58 PM
    Nine Tips to Stay Safe when Horse Camping Trails Trail Riding 19 04-07-2010 10:08 AM
    My horse won't stay outta my space brittany Horse Training 14 03-03-2009 02:28 PM
    My horse just won't stay in the pasture! Light-Hikari Horse Training 18 07-22-2008 10:46 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:08 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0