Impulsion and Extension without false aids - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Impulsion and Extension without false aids

This is a discussion on Impulsion and Extension without false aids within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    Like Tree3Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-27-2011, 09:41 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    

    Once he accepts you holding the whip, the training for you leg begins. You should never have to "kick" the horse the way you say you need to. One small squeeze with your leg should get a reaction to energize. If the horse ignores that, you squeeze harder. If he ignores that, give a light tap...then a little harder tap. Wherever he finally reacts, I give immediate praise to show him what I am looking for. He needs to know that if he ignores you, there will be something else coming.

    A dressage whip is an invaluable extension of the leg for a horse who is ignoring you.
    The top paragraph is a better explanation of what I was trying to say! If he has no respect for your legs, dressage will be very difficult. I don't compete out here as I live in Germany and you have to do something called a reitabzeichen and you have to be able to jump 100-110cm, and that petrifies me. However, I train at a high level, legs are the most important thing.

    Also, if he's finding the impulsion hard, have you tried lunging him with a lunge whip. Be gentle and use your voice, there is very rarely and need to crack a lunge whip. It may help his impulsion and you'llbe able to see if he's working correctly from his hind :) After he's worked well in that, it would be a super time to start desensitising if you decide to use a schooling whip.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        09-27-2011, 11:00 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    So the consensus here seems to be the dressage whip. Is there any reason that most of you prefer a dressage whip over spurs or a crop? I only used the dressage whip with my last horse... but when I bought him, that's what the previous owner told me to use. So I still don't have much clarity on why you would use one over the others.
         
        09-27-2011, 01:00 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    The dressage whip is longer and lighter than a crop. You can use it with very little hand movements. With a crop you have to pull your hand back to touch the hindquarters.

    I don't use spurs because I don't feel I'm experienced enough. Plus, I've always been taught that they shouldn't really be used to make a horse go faster, just to refine the aids.

    I'll second on the dressage whips. My mare isn't fond of crops or whips or anything like that, but I don't even use the whip on her, I will press it against her side, or just tap her. It's very effective and won't hurt a bit.
         
        09-27-2011, 01:24 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    LOVE THIS SITE!! Lots of horsepeople with really good advice, and seldom judgemental. I LIKE the ideas suggested above. Might I add that your horse has some baggage, and it will take him LONGER to get rid of it than it would a horse trained correctly from the start, which was before you bought him.
    I suggest that you teach him loose lunging, always turning towards you in the center when changing reins. CARRY A LUNGE WHIP!!! Also, the first time you do it, have an escape plan ready. You never know what ALL the baggage is until you cue for it. (He probably will be ok. I guess that being kicked in the head by one horse and thrown by another keep ME on the defensive. Just an FYI.)=b
    After that, teach him to lunge on a line. You are looking (intially) for any sign of obedience, then you stop and rewad him to develop confidence and to set you up as the lead broodmare (or, if you're a man, you are the lead stallion) in the relationship.
    JUST LIKE when you were in school, every session you will teach your horse more. What is initially rewarded in the first ground schooling will be expected after a week of same. Then, you ask for more. I am teaching my two 5 yo geldings changes within gait on the loose lunge and on the lunge line, for example, I get a faster and a slower trot out of them, on command.
    I like to use the word, "no" when my horse gets it wrong, then the praise is the "yes." "No" doesn't frighten a horse, and sometimes people still hit them when they don't do things right.
    Although I pick and choose from the current tv trainers I agree with them that you horse needs to be desensitized to your tools. It's always a good idea to approach your horse with the whip and rub him with it, so he KNOWS it won't eat him.
         
        09-27-2011, 02:02 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Oxer    
    so the consensus here seems to be the dressage whip. Is there any reason that most of you prefer a dressage whip over spurs or a crop? I only used the dressage whip with my last horse... but when I bought him, that's what the previous owner told me to use. So I still don't have much clarity on why you would use one over the others.
    Actually, to get a horse on the aids, I prefer a short crop, because I get a better response when tapping--or slapping!-- the base of the neck. I generally don't use force with a dressage whip-- it's used to touch areas I can't otherwise reach. (I have short legs.) Of course, it IS occasionally used more sharply if I need it. (I use the 2-second rule: a light leg aid, count two seconds, then both legs and the whip hard and fast, accepting whatever happens-- then back to the walk or whatever, and lo and behold, the soft leg "works" again.)

    Do get him used to your carrying a crop--and a bag--and a raincoat-- in fact, anything you need to tote around some day. It took a long time with a previous hot little horse I had, but it was worth it to get her used to "things" behind her head.
         
        09-27-2011, 02:08 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beling    
    Do get him used to your carrying a crop--and a bag--and a raincoat-- in fact, anything you need to tote around some day. It took a long time with a previous hot little horse I had, but it was worth it to get her used to "things" behind her head.
    Agreed.
         
        09-27-2011, 03:26 PM
      #17
    mls
    Trained
    I don't think it's the whip since he also reacted to the reins. Have you noticed if it is just one side or the other that he reacts to things behind him?
         
        09-27-2011, 04:43 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    I don't think it's the whip since he also reacted to the reins. Have you noticed if it is just one side or the other that he reacts to things behind him?
    the reins I had swatted him over both sides of his withers. I also carried the crop once and he was sensitive to it being in either hand, on either side.
    When he came to me he was painfully head shy. Which we have worked through. He's only been with me for about 3 months so I am finding things out about him as I go. The crop thing was unexpected and I should have taken a moment to find out how he would react to it before I mounted with it in my hands! He's smart and desensitizes pretty well... so it's something we're going to need to take time to work on.

    So much good information here. Thanks a ton everybody!
         
        09-27-2011, 08:14 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    Yesterday I rode with a crop for the first time. I kept thinking about it and before I did, I hit it against my leg to see how it felt. It really does not hurt at all. I also wore spurs first starting but ditched them a long time ago. I think we can underestimate the strength of our legs.

    Hardest thing for me is getting coordinated enough to carry it. Also, I assume you carry the crop on the inside of the circle?
         
        09-27-2011, 09:16 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Oxer    
    so the consensus here seems to be the dressage whip. Is there any reason that most of you prefer a dressage whip over spurs or a crop? I only used the dressage whip with my last horse... but when I bought him, that's what the previous owner told me to use. So I still don't have much clarity on why you would use one over the others.
    With a dressage whip, you can reach anywhere you need your horse to move. The difference between a tap on the rump and a tap on the shoulder is that the horse will be reminded to move forward from his hind end, not just string himself out and go faster. You can reach his shoulder, barrel, and rump and get him moving off exactly how he needs to. It allows for refinement without changing reins or contact that a crop and/or spurs can't offer.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    aids for extension AQHA English Riding 4 09-22-2010 05:10 PM
    Impulsion??? XxFUDGEISTHEBOMBxX Horse Riding 2 11-04-2009 04:45 PM
    outside aids vrs inside aids kerplop English Riding 5 05-03-2009 07:51 AM
    Impulsion & Tracking Up Ne0n Zero Dressage 6 04-21-2009 07:23 PM
    Impulsion Light Bright Horse Training 3 08-28-2008 03:15 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:37 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0