Indoor Etiquette
 
 

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Indoor Etiquette

This is a discussion on Indoor Etiquette within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Indoor riding ring rules
  • Safety rules when riding in an indoor arena

 
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    01-04-2010, 08:34 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Post Indoor Etiquette

I was reading an article in the new EQUUS magazine and thought I would post a piece of it on here. It is about indoor arena etiquette.

"There are certain standard rules for sharing an indoor arena with fellow riders- and not just as a courtesy. Following these guidelines will help keep all riders and horses safe, even in the most crowded riding space.

  • Before entering a riding arena, call "Door" loudly and wait for a reply. This helps to avoid spooking horses by suddenly sliding a noisy door aside as they pass by.
  • Mount and adjust tack in the center of the ring, don't block the track.
  • Talk with your instructor quietly in the center of the ring, but if you want to chat with spectators, move out of the ring to do so.
  • Keep the riding ring a "No cellphone zone", no calling or texting while riding!
  • Keep a safe distance form other horses ( minimum of one horse length, more when trotting or cantering) and never let your horse crowd, tailgait, or threaten another horse.
  • In some riding rings everyone is expected to ride in the same direction and change directions at the same time. When riding in both directions is permitted, oncoming riders should pass left shoulder to left shoulder, like cars on a highway.
  • Riders who are trotting or cantering should have the right of way on the outside of the track. If you are slowing down or stopping, don't block the rail- move to the inside of the track.
  • When you need to pass a rider, call out "rail please" or "on your left", and pass widely and safely.
  • When jumping call your intended obstacle such as "whit picket" or "diagonal combination" loudly and clearly before you approach.
  • If you see a horse acting up or a rider having difficulties, slow down, circle or stop until the horse is under control. Be considerate of novice riders and green horses, give them extra space and never pass them closely or going fast.
  • Do not longe a horse in a ring full of riders." By Susan E. Harris
I just thought I would post this, I found it very informative myself. What do you guys think?
     
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    01-04-2010, 08:40 PM
  #2
Foal
This is a awasome thread, I think all barns should have rules like this, At the place where I board my horse we have areana rules Very similar to this, there are more but sadly alot of people don't follow them, kinda wish they did as there will be four people riding and one person trying to do a course, Its hassle to get out of there way between every jump
     
    01-04-2010, 09:00 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Good rules for an indoor or the warm up ring at a show!

Except for the 'everyone has to go the same way' rule. Not everyone can go the same direction and then switch at the same time.
     
    01-04-2010, 09:06 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover    
good rules for an indoor or the warm up ring at a show!

Except for the 'everyone has to go the same way' rule. Not everyone can go the same direction and then switch at the same time.
that is why the next part of that one is about different direction riding....
     
    01-04-2010, 09:13 PM
  #5
Green Broke
And also why it says 'in SOME riding rings everyone is expected to ride in the same direction'.... it would be hard to ride in those rings.
     
    01-05-2010, 01:37 PM
  #6
Trained
This is also called "common courtesy". And it's also the reason that I don't ride at schooling or novice shows, because there is none.
As someone who doesn't just ride around in circles, it is very difficult to school my horse around people that don't know what the heck courtesy is! I am very courteous to less advanced riders and call my lines, but still some people cut me off. I am so tempted to run them over sometimes.
Also - why I hate jumping shows!! In the warmup, people call their fences like 3 strides out.. -_- So not cool I have almost been killed by idiots calling their fences when they are halfway over them. And at a lot of jumping shows, they do have the everyone goes in the same direction rule. Because there are 40 horses, and fences, and people jumping fences in a 80ft x 200ft ring.
     
    01-05-2010, 01:44 PM
  #7
Trained
Riders who are trotting or cantering should have the right of way on the outside of the track. If you are slowing down or stopping, don't block the rail- move to the inside of the track

This is the only one I sort of disagree with. Where I board if people walking go to the inside the people who are trotting & cantering are stuck on their rail & not able to turn in to circle easily so people walking tend to stay on the rail if they are going the same direction as the people trotting or cantering
     
    01-05-2010, 02:51 PM
  #8
Started
I never school with jumpers at schooling shows its really scary lol. If someone is working their horse in a circle at one end I usually just take the other side of the ring. I don't pass on one specific side. I use good judgement to determine what to do at the time.

I usually give the lesson kids, or kids who don't know how to ride as well the right of way. I'd rather not assume they know ring ettiquite or that they can even stear around me, on a dull lesson horse.
     
    01-05-2010, 02:54 PM
  #9
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsygirl    
Riders who are trotting or cantering should have the right of way on the outside of the track. If you are slowing down or stopping, don't block the rail- move to the inside of the track

This is the only one I sort of disagree with. Where I board if people walking go to the inside the people who are trotting & cantering are stuck on their rail & not able to turn in to circle easily so people walking tend to stay on the rail if they are going the same direction as the people trotting or cantering
More strides at the trot or canter - thus the reason to use the rail for the faster speeds. Next step down from a walk is the stop - which needs to be done in the center of the ring.
     
    01-05-2010, 02:57 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
More strides at the trot or canter - thus the reason to use the rail for the faster speeds. Next step down from a walk is the stop - which needs to be done in the center of the ring.
i know, im just saying what I have noticed works well at my barn.
     

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