Ive been defeated... - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Ive been defeated...

This is a discussion on Ive been defeated... within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-08-2011, 04:51 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by apachewhitesox    
    I agree with everyone else about checking for pain. I know how you feel about being scared when on a horse my boy did that to me (as a beginner) it scared me till I cryed (bit embarrassing) in front of my trainer.
    I have since done A LOT of groundwork with him to gain his respect and make sure he understands as many cues as possible from the ground. He also reared when being lunged but hasn't done it in over a month. We have both come to understand each other much better and he is now my most well behaved horse on the ground. I'm yet to get back on him because I'm not experienced enough.
    im not down there tomorrow, but I will check for pain etc on thursday. If I can rule all that out, i'll do some groundwork with her & maybe attempt to get back on..depending on how she is..and how nervous I am. But I have never had a horse make me nervous at all, let alone reduce me to tears of fear..
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-08-2011, 04:54 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Well good luck!! I think you can do it
         
        03-08-2011, 04:56 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    You were lucky this time. Next time?

    [QUOTE=KawaiiCharlie;955133]i know it was a huge mistake getting off her, but I was terrified to the point of crying & shaking like a leaf.. I shouldnt have though. I know my hands were low, I was really tense.. i'll try and fix that next time..

    No, Charlie, the huge mistake was getting ON her. You don't know this horse yet. You should not get on a horse that you know so little about, especially one that already told you that she had problems; she didn't want to lead, she almost reared, she had a hizzy fit the other day when you tied her. Sorry, dear, I think you are a sweetypie, but that is plain foolish to get on at this point.

    Looking at that picture of you on her, that horse's mind is in another country, it's so far away from you. She has no connection to the rider on her back, why she hardly knows you are there. Look at how hard her focus is elswhere!

    You need to work with her solely on the ground for a bit, during which time you will investigate her tack , build her balance and curb her hay belly. You will watch her and learn WHO she is and what needs to be worked on. You will get her to start looking to YOU for help when she is upset about leaving her mates in the paddock.

    Take your time. She could be a real diamond in the rough. Don't get up on her until you have some assuredness that the five minutes you are on will be successful and make the next time up easier.

    Good luck and stay in touch.
         
        03-08-2011, 05:42 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Great post tinyliny!
         
        03-08-2011, 09:02 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    [quote=tinyliny;955236]
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KawaiiCharlie    
    i know it was a huge mistake getting off her, but I was terrified to the point of crying & shaking like a leaf.. I shouldnt have though. I know my hands were low, I was really tense.. i'll try and fix that next time..

    No, Charlie, the huge mistake was getting ON her. You don't know this horse yet. You should not get on a horse that you know so little about, especially one that already told you that she had problems; she didn't want to lead, she almost reared, she had a hizzy fit the other day when you tied her. Sorry, dear, I think you are a sweetypie, but that is plain foolish to get on at this point.

    Looking at that picture of you on her, that horse's mind is in another country, it's so far away from you. She has no connection to the rider on her back, why she hardly knows you are there. Look at how hard her focus is elswhere!

    You need to work with her solely on the ground for a bit, during which time you will investigate her tack , build her balance and curb her hay belly. You will watch her and learn WHO she is and what needs to be worked on. You will get her to start looking to YOU for help when she is upset about leaving her mates in the paddock.

    Take your time. She could be a real diamond in the rough. Don't get up on her until you have some assuredness that the five minutes you are on will be successful and make the next time up easier.

    Good luck and stay in touch.
    I agree completely. I think that you need to work with her on the ground a bit more before you start riding her. Let her know you and you know her and her movements. Then you might better understand why she is acting this way. It seems like she needs a lot of ground work anyways if she is that bad on the ground.
         
        03-08-2011, 09:14 PM
      #16
    Trained
    In your original post, you say you were shaking before you even go on. There's your answer. If you're nervous before you get on, you've already lost that day. Sounds like she's just fresh from having the time off. Just take it slowly. Do only what you're comfortable with. If you have to, bring someone in just to get her over the initial back to work hump. Trust your gut. You'll know when you're ready to back up there.
         
        03-08-2011, 09:29 PM
      #17
    Trained
    I would say, given her issues on the ground, you've got a lot to work through. She gave you ALOT of clues into how poor of a ride she was going to be long before you got on...(antzy, pawing, nervousness, refusing to stand, etc).

    After getting her thoroughly vetted (if she hasn't already), I would start some serious ground work to re-establish some serious respect for her handlers. If you don't have a rope halter, use a bridle with a simple snaffle bit, so she can't lean on a flat halter. Work on lunging, with lots of transitions, get her bending, and flexing her head and neck, get her to yield her hips and shoulders, etc...with alot of ground work (atleast 30 minutes a day if you can) I am betting you will see a huge difference in a matter of a week or two. If she was a pasture puff for so long, that is your biggest issue here; she doesn't want to work, and she likely has little to no respect for handlers, due to not being worked with for so long. Go back to the basics and you will see some change fairly quickly.

    As far as what you did (getting off and lunging her) I do not think you were wrong in doing this; As long as she was not untacked and brought back to her stall she DID NOT win her spaz attack...she still had to work, regardless of "how" she had to work. I probably would have worked her on the ground even longer than you did, just to really make my point that YOU WILL work, period, no questions asked!!!

    When you do get back on, I am going to ask that you not simply walk her; get her feet moving...the more she has to focus on moving, the less she can focus on bucking, rearing, or kicking out, etc...so get her trotting and cantering, don't just walk!!! Walking is mindless, and enables a horse to 'think' about not having to work...make her work, and make her have a reason to want to stop and stand still.
         
        03-08-2011, 09:50 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    If you are just looking after her until she is sold, why not just lunge her?
    You have no stake in this horse, you were not asked to train her, just exersize her, right? Then why risk injury to yourself or the horse?
         
        03-10-2011, 06:03 PM
      #19
    Foal
    You might need to keep trying to ''tame her" or ride her when you show her who's boss she wont do that anymore.
         
        03-10-2011, 06:21 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ErikaLynn    
    You HAVE to get back on her. The biggest mistake you made was getting off after she reared...she won, and she knew it.

    Next time you ride her..lounge her first...then get on. If she rears or misbehaves, just keep riding...I know it's scary, but you cannot let her win again.

    Also..in the last picture your hands seem really low...try not to pull down on her mouth when she about to rear. Keep your hands up and keep moving forward...if she's trotting it's harder for her to rear up.

    Another thing..try caring a crop with you and if she's bad..whack her with it. It will snap her out of her "mood" for a minute.
    That's true, you do need to get back on no matter what. Do you ride with a trainer? I would suggest it with a horse that could be dangerous. Also just try not to be scared, horses sense it.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    I am defeated! PaintsPwn Horse Training 43 01-17-2010 12:23 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:27 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0