Keeping a horse that is holding you back
   

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Keeping a horse that is holding you back

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  • Horse is holding me back
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    04-28-2012, 02:20 AM
  #1
Weanling
Keeping a horse that is holding you back

Does anybody else here have the predicament of having a horse that is possibly (or for certain) holding you back in progressing with your riding, though you can not/will not sell that horse and can not afford to get another?

Please share your stories! It is pretty frusterating.
     
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    04-28-2012, 02:32 AM
  #2
Trained
I do not but I know of a few people who do. Majority of the time is because the person thinks the horse will improve and or be sound again, wishful thinking. However it sounds like you are aware of your horse's shortcomings in your desired equestrian pursuits and can't sell him but can't manage owning a second horse. Enjoy your horse for what he can do and one day things will change & you'll have a horse better suited to your goals. It's a better way of thinking and makes life more pleasant.
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    04-28-2012, 02:37 AM
  #3
Showing
Well then you either need to find him a forever home (sell), or give him a forever home with no job (keep) and find a different horse.
     
    04-28-2012, 02:49 AM
  #4
Weanling
It's not the fact of being lame or realistically non-sellable, but the fact of the rider being ready to move up and having too strong a connection with the current horse (over 7 years ) to sell.

Was just curious, as I can not imagine I am the only one.
Also, that is a good view point Waresbear. Hard to accept though!
     
    04-28-2012, 03:14 AM
  #5
Trained
You love that horse and want to keep him with you but right now it is not financially possible to get a second horse? Hey there's a lot of light at the end of your tunnel! One day sooner than you think, you will be able to get a higher level horse for you to progress on and your beloved horse will have a buddy. You have a lot to look forward to! Remember, frustration gets us no where, anticipation of good things to come is a blast!
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    04-28-2012, 03:27 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
You love that horse and want to keep him with you but right now it is not financially possible to get a second horse? Hey there's a lot of light at the end of your tunnel! One day sooner than you think, you will be able to get a higher level horse for you to progress on and your beloved horse will have a buddy. You have a lot to look forward to! Remember, frustration gets us no where, anticipation of good things to come is a blast!
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I agree. Working hard towards something and anticipating a good thing in the future is great and healthy (that is typically what I tend to do in life), but that only works to an extent, especially about something your are so passionate about. You can only take so much of it! ;)

My horse already has a buddy, so he's golden horse-friendship wise, but you are correct in regards to financially not being able to afford board for another.

Thanks for the pep talk.
     
    04-28-2012, 03:39 AM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostDragonflyWings    
It's not the fact of being lame or realistically non-sellable, but the fact of the rider being ready to move up and having too strong a connection with the current horse (over 7 years ) to sell.

Was just curious, as I can not imagine I am the only one.
Also, that is a good view point Waresbear. Hard to accept though!
I had my black and white gelding for 8 years, bought him when he was 4 and I was only 13. I learned so much on that horse, did so much, and knew everything about him. I could tell you what every quirk he had meant, what he would do before he would do it, and knew every little nuance of his personality.

But he wasn't the world-class horse I was striving to compete on. His back was a bit too long, so his lope was not good enough to win us higher than congress. Even though I became a better trainer in the end, because working with a horse to overcome his physical shortcomings was impressive, I wanted to improve my skill on a horse that was bred and built better and who could get me to the worlds.

I knew that there was someone out there who could benefit from my well-trained boy, someone who could learn a lot just like I had. Though I didn't really get to make the decision as my mom sold him behind my back. And even though I am deeply sad sometimes for losing my best friend, I know that someone else is enjoying him. And then when Lily came into my life I knew I was on the right path.
Corporal likes this.
     
    04-28-2012, 03:43 AM
  #8
Trained
In a way, I am anticipating getting the horse of dreams when my horse is retired, he is only 12 so it's going to be awhile! While he's not holding me back from showing or progressing, I really want an Arab show horse to compete in breed shows (my horse is a Paint). Financially I could just go & purchase the dreamhorse however I don't have the time for 3 horses (I own my horse's sire as well) but since I would be heartbroken without my Indy, I enjoy what I can do with him which keeps me busy. But one day I will have my flashy Arab, I love looking forward to that!
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    04-28-2012, 04:09 AM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
I had my black and white gelding for 8 years, bought him when he was 4 and I was only 13. I learned so much on that horse, did so much, and knew everything about him. I could tell you what every quirk he had meant, what he would do before he would do it, and knew every little nuance of his personality.

But he wasn't the world-class horse I was striving to compete on. His back was a bit too long, so his lope was not good enough to win us higher than congress. Even though I became a better trainer in the end, because working with a horse to overcome his physical shortcomings was impressive, I wanted to improve my skill on a horse that was bred and built better and who could get me to the worlds.

I knew that there was someone out there who could benefit from my well-trained boy, someone who could learn a lot just like I had. Though I didn't really get to make the decision as my mom sold him behind my back. And even though I am deeply sad sometimes for losing my best friend, I know that someone else is enjoying him. And then when Lily came into my life I knew I was on the right path.
Exactly. We have learned and grown so much together. Betterment was a two-way-street and we have both always had each other's back (well, maybe not in some cases on his end of the deal!).

Not only is our connection and our history a factor, but the reality that if he were to leave, nothing is protecting him from getting hurt. There are thousands of horses out there who need homes; some who don't have the best confirmation, or the best higher-level abilities, etc., and then those who do. When you sell a horse, you may know who you are selling the horse to, but then that horse could be sold again and end up in completely the wrong hands, whether it be somebody who screws them up (training wise or psychologically), or somebody who fails them completely and they end up on a truck headed for slaughter.

You don't have to travel far to find a horse "owner" who completely neglects their horses (especially psychologically). Sometimes they even board where you board!

I know this sounds a little "out there" and a little "over-concerning", but it's sadly the reality. Personally, I am sorry, but I can't risk putting my partner of 8 years up to that type of vulnerability. He may not be perfect or be able to get me where I am dying to go, but he doesn't deserve the slightest chance of a crappy life either. He has played a huge part in where I am now in my riding, and needs some respect and payback for that.

Leasing out would be more of a viable option, though.
     
    04-28-2012, 09:25 AM
  #10
Foal
An easy fix is to lease your horse to a barn that does lessons. You can ride the horse whenever you want but they take care of it and let other riders get better from your horse.
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