Keeping a horse that is holding you back - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 27 Old 04-29-2012, 09:39 PM
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It depends on what's more important to you. Progressing in your riding, or just enjoying your riding without a heap of improvement. I used to feel like that, not being able to sell a horse that I really liked but was never going to get anywhere. I'm over it now, I want to better my riding, and don't feel that it's fair on me or the horse, to expect a horse to move up levels when it's not able to.

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post #12 of 27 Old 04-30-2012, 02:09 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
It depends on what's more important to you. Progressing in your riding, or just enjoying your riding without a heap of improvement. I used to feel like that, not being able to sell a horse that I really liked but was never going to get anywhere. I'm over it now, I want to better my riding, and don't feel that it's fair on me or the horse, to expect a horse to move up levels when it's not able to.
I do not expect the horse to go further than he is capable of; he is just not going to go as far as another horse could take me. I am brainstorming and will hopefully work something out eventually...
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post #13 of 27 Old 04-30-2012, 02:19 AM
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I know a person.... Me. Cinny is not really helping my riding, currently. He has become my heart horse, and a member of the family. I do hope that one day he will improve, but he may not. He may just end up being a "play" horse, who knows.

My solution, when I move to Kansas City in a few months, I will be moving to a larger stable with better access to training, and LESSON HORSES.
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post #14 of 27 Old 04-30-2012, 04:56 AM
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I guess it depends what you want from riding.

You're either going to care more about your horse or more about competing/advancing.

That sounds a little harsh but I don't mean you don't care heaps about your horse either way, it's just that you're going to have one priority or the other. If you've got that close a bond to your horse keep him, if you are more interested in improving sell him.

I'd like to keep all my horses for ever, but so far I haven't ever been in the situation where I can. It's very sad saying goodbye.
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post #15 of 27 Old 04-30-2012, 08:20 AM
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That's a question everyone has to answer for themselves. Do you want to continue to move up the levels of whatever sport it is you do and be competitive? One can continue to improve their riding and general horsemanship on just about anything so long as it's sound, but if you want to actually follow a progression from one level to the next, you need a horse who is physically capable of what is being demanded of it at each level.

I see it as a bit of a false dichotomy between a horse you can "improve" on and one you can't. Most of us can stand to improve our position, the timing and finesse of our aids, the softness of our horses and so on. You don't need a fancy horse for that. I myself have made a huge difference in how my horse goes by sorting out some issues with my riding and hence have found a well of impulsion and power I can now play with which wasn't there before. Don't need a new horse. Just need to be less crap at riding the one I have.

However, if improvement to you also means jumping 5ft or doing FEI dressage, then you may need the fancy horse.

The other way of looking at it is that if you are indeed still working out issues in your riding ( and I don't know if anyone on this thread is or isn't, but if you are), then work on those with the horse you have. If and when you get a fancier horse, you'll then screw up its training slightly less. The flashiest warmblood in the world isn't going to compensate for a unbalanced, uncertain rider who is still learning how to maintain a soft feel.

Last edited by thesilverspear; 04-30-2012 at 08:26 AM.
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post #16 of 27 Old 04-30-2012, 08:35 AM
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we are currently working thru it but my horse has stiffness issues in his hind legs, dont know if it is hocks or stifles its very fustrating. the vet suggested injections but hes only 12 and i think that is pretty invasive, we have been doing stuff to help him use himself better like using sidereins. hes doing better but he prolly wont go to high in dressage, the smaller circles wont be good for his hind end, i love him but dont know how many years he will be good to show.
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post #17 of 27 Old 04-30-2012, 11:41 AM
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When I sort of "grew out" of my old horse and he took me as far as he possibly could, I leased him out and leased a horse for myself to continue learning/showing. I have had my old horse for almost 10 years, I got him on my 13th birthday and I owe a lot to that little horse. He will have a forever home with me, I will always find a way to keep him around. Currently I still have him and another project horse. I found a guy just up the road from me that was looking for a safe horse to keep on the farm for when his granddaughter comes to visit. He gets to live on this nice farm and gets taken care of, for free. I can go visit him whenever, and all I do is pay his ferrier/vet bills. It works out great because it allows me to pay my project horse's bills but still keep him around. There are many things you can look into that don't include getting rid of your current horse.
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post #18 of 27 Old 05-01-2012, 01:56 PM
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I know several people like that and try to tell them horses are livestock and can be bought and sold, sell the horse if you dont get along with it, and get one that you like. Horse are not in house pets that you keep forever they are livestock.
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post #19 of 27 Old 05-01-2012, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboy bowhunter View Post
I know several people like that and try to tell them horses are livestock and can be bought and sold, sell the horse if you dont get along with it, and get one that you like. Horse are not in house pets that you keep forever they are livestock.
I know that a LOT of people here would disagree with you. Even my husband says my horse is part of the family and when I wanted to sell him, stopped me. The kids would be heartbroken. Our horse is as much a friend, companion and part of the family as our dogs are, or our cat or other pets.

Maybe you just have never had a bond with a horse????
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post #20 of 27 Old 05-01-2012, 03:36 PM
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For me, I ended up with an old lady horse, who I love dearly, but she's still an old lady.
When I bought her I wanted to show, I wanted to jump, all sorts of stuff, but at that point she wasn't well enough trained to do any of that. Now that she is well enough trained, her body can't handle it (27 years old, I got her at 23).

I love her dearly and though she's holding me back in the things I'd like to do, she's teaching me some much more about other things.
It turned out that she adores trail riding so we spend most of our riding time, trail riding. We go "exploring" through neighborhoods and through the woods we have access to. I used to be a nervous rider (still am sometimes) but she's taught me that she's generally pretty steady and that every little scary thing isn't a huge deal. She's teaching me about keeping a horse at home, which I wouldn't be doing if she were younger because her current situation is really set up for trail riding and not a lot else.

So yeah, she's holding me back from the things I want but she's also teaching me valuable horsemanship that I might not have gotten from a horse that was capable of the things I want to do. And you know, now that I've had her for 4 years, I find showing/jumping/etc becoming less and less important to me. I'd sure like to show one day, just for funnsies, and I miss riding in an English saddle but my Aussie saddle and a good trail ride is close enough for now.

She's more important to me than my desires and since I'm letting her, she's teaching me so much more than I ever even considered needing to know. I know what you're feeling.
If you want to keep him, sometimes a change of perspective is all that's needed to take a "less than" situation and turn it into a "more than" situation. :)

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