Keeping a youngster or giving up?
   

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Keeping a youngster or giving up?

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    09-11-2012, 10:05 AM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Keeping a youngster or giving up?

Hey guys, I have a problem and i'm torn between what to do.
I had a 23 year old mare for about 4 years, she basically taught me how to ride and took me over jumps up to a metre without ever stopping. She was never silly and was the perfect hack anyone could want, never spooking. - Unfortunately I had to sell her as all of the pony club activities, the showing, jumping etc was getting to her and her back end was giving way. So I sold her. A day after, I bought a 4 year old youngster.
She is so gorgeous, she really does have so much quality. Anyway, at first I really enjoyed it, I had this fabulous blue and white mare that I was working in the field and she was listening to me and teaching me how to stick to the occasional bucks she put in and really getting an outline. But then, I took her out of the farm. She nearly put me in a ditch out on a hack, she's bronked me off several times and I genuinely think that now she knows she can get me off, then that's the way she's going to get out of work. People have also said that its her way of how to deal with being in a new place whenever we take her out.
So I put her up for sale because I honestly do miss going to shows, hacking for miles and just generally not having to worry all the time about getting thrown off. I'm not confident riding her anymore.
But now i'm having second thoughts. Should I not give up? Should I not put her up for sale anymore and carry on riding because surely this can't last forever? I really don't know what to do. ):
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    09-11-2012, 10:18 AM
  #2
Green Broke
Depends. IMO, you need a trainer to help you work through this. If you're not willing to get help before she gets worse and you end up way over your head, sell her. Be honest if you sell her. If you get help, work with the trainer to figure out what's best.
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    09-11-2012, 10:24 AM
  #3
Showing
The way I see it, you have two options: work with a trainer to get her where you want her (it's going to take time and $!) or sell her and get something more mature and well broke.
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    09-11-2012, 10:28 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingArabian    
Depends. IMO, you need a trainer to help you work through this. If you're not willing to get help before she gets worse and you end up way over your head, sell her. Be honest if you sell her. If you get help, work with the trainer to figure out what's best.
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I have a trainer and she told me it will be a long term problem as she has confidence issues when going to new places and it's not something we can work on every day as we would need to go to a variety of different places over a long period of time.
     
    09-11-2012, 10:30 AM
  #5
Foal
I also don't have my own transport, and when I do go to shows my friend gives me lifts with her horses as well so its not like I can just hook a trailer on and go whenever I feel' like it :/
     
    09-11-2012, 10:41 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Does she act up like that at home?
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    09-11-2012, 10:50 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Going from a 23 year old mare to a 4 year old youngster is quite a difference-yes, you may have needed a younger horse, but it sounds like you still need a well trained,willing partner that knows how to get the job done. I'd suggest selling the youngster & taking your time finding another schoolmaster. Being bucked off w/regularity is not a good thing.
     
    09-11-2012, 10:54 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingArabian    
Does she act up like that at home?
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Nope, only when going to new places. She's a real sweetheart at home.
     
    09-11-2012, 10:59 AM
  #9
Showing
The only thing that's going to change her wigging out will be taking her to unfamiliar places on a regular basis. As a youngster she's not a been there/done that type horse, and the only way to make her one is to get her out as much as possible.

Don't know why you or your trainer thought buying a youngster was a great idea, especially since you don't have the experience necessary to handle one. Do this horse a favor and sell her to someone who has the expertise to turn her into a good all arounder, if you can't or won't give her the best chance to succeed.
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    09-11-2012, 11:33 AM
  #10
Yearling
You don't have to like what Speedracer has to say, but she is dead on correct. Based on what you posted, you don't have the experience to deal with 4 year old bucker.

Horses aren't generally the problem out and about. It is almost always the rider. Take away the arena and suddenly a rider gets nervous and expects a blow-up. If you think your horse is going to buck, she probably won't disappoint you. Chances are if you remain calm and are a strong leader, the bucking on the trail will disappear. If you don't have the ability to do that, she will continue bucking.
Horses feed off the energy of the rider.
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