Lesson programs lowering standards - Page 11 - The Horse Forum

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post #101 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 09:02 PM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKbq...e_gdata_player
84

Different seat from today. Still the alignment, but without the split seat that is seen nowadays.

Something to think about.....
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post #102 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 09:10 PM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPgB...e_gdata_player
Not dressage, and please look at the seat. Its in slo mo, so very good to see.
He is in NEAR perfect alignment, even in a lope. He doesn't want the perfect alignment, different saddle and different purpose.
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post #103 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 09:14 PM
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First, I'm a huge Stacy Westfall fan as well. Have you guys seen the Ellen show that she was on? Hilarious seeing Ellen on a reining horse!
Second, what have you instructors found to be helpful in your teaching? I think we've covered the potential behind lunge-line lessons, Vaulting, no-stirrup work. What else do you guys do to help your students?
A big one I have found for helping students sit the trot is relaxation techniques, for lack of a batter word. I guess that's just what I call it. I think I learned it in a Yoga class in college? Forgive me if this is a common technique in riding, I was never taught it in a riding setting. Basically, I lunge the student and starting from the top down, we isolate body parts. I tell them to inhale as the flex or scrunch that body part, and then relax it as they exhale. We do that top to bottom a couple times, and then we do the whole body flex and whole body relax. I have seen it transform bouncy riders into fluid equestrians. I think kids don't even realize they are tensing their muscles and that is the cause for their bouncing around in the saddle.
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post #104 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 09:15 PM
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First, I'm a huge Stacy Westfall fan as well. Have you guys seen the Ellen show that she was on? Hilarious seeing Ellen on a reining horse!
Second, what have you instructors found to be helpful in your teaching? I think we've covered the potential behind lunge-line lessons, Vaulting, no-stirrup work. What else do you guys do to help your students?
A big one I have found for helping students sit the trot is relaxation techniques, for lack of a batter word. I guess that's just what I call it. I think I learned it in a Yoga class in college? Forgive me if this is a common technique in riding, I was never taught it in a riding setting. Basically, I lunge the student and starting from the top down, we isolate body parts. I tell them to inhale as the flex or scrunch that body part, and then relax it as they exhale. We do that top to bottom a couple times, and then we do the whole body flex and whole body relax. I have seen it transform bouncy riders into fluid equestrians. I think kids don't even realize they are tensing their muscles and that is the cause for their bouncing around in the saddle.
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post #105 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 09:22 PM Thread Starter
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When I teach sitting trot the thing I find works is a very old school technique actually. I tell the student to think about dropping all their weight in their seat bones like their bum weighs a thousand pounds and think of their ankles absorbing the impact. Then to open up their pelvis and almost pretend they are peddling a bike backwards. It seems to work well. When my students learn sitting trot I actually encourage them to lean back until they feel like they are leaning to far. The reason is I find as soon as someone starts sitting trot they want to pitch their entire body forward and go into fetal position. So if they think of leaning back with their shoulders square, their pelvis open and seat bones weighing a thousand pounds it seems to work.

Now I do not throw this all at them in one sentence. We do each individual step first. So they start by thinking of sinking their weight in their seat bones. We do a bit of trot, if they don't get it then I say think of peddling a bike backwards while sitting deep. Sometimes this works. Then I tell them to think of leaning back. And just keep building it from their. They almost always seem to get it by the time I have them picture peddling backwards.

I take reins away when learning sitting trot as it is when they seem to want to balance on the reins the most.
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post #106 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 09:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
Thank you for the videos. I think we can at least agree that they show great riding.
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post #107 of 110 Old 12-04-2012, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NBEventer View Post
When I teach sitting trot the thing I find works is a very old school technique actually. I tell the student to think about dropping all their weight in their seat bones like their bum weighs a thousand pounds and think of their ankles absorbing the impact. .

See, this is why I have always had such a well balanced seat. Not because I am extra talented but because my bum really does weigh a thousand pounds. Ha ha Even when I was stick thin, my bum was my heaviest area. You know the words to that song, "Little in the middle but she's got much Back?" Well, that is me exactly. It pays off in some areas of life. ha ha

Sorry, couldn't help myself... carry on.
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post #108 of 110 Old 12-05-2012, 04:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NBEventer View Post
When I teach sitting trot the thing I find works is a very old school technique actually. I tell the student to think about dropping all their weight in their seat bones like their bum weighs a thousand pounds and think of their ankles absorbing the impact. Then to open up their pelvis and almost pretend they are peddling a bike backwards. It seems to work well. When my students learn sitting trot I actually encourage them to lean back until they feel like they are leaning to far. The reason is I find as soon as someone starts sitting trot they want to pitch their entire body forward and go into fetal position. So if they think of leaning back with their shoulders square, their pelvis open and seat bones weighing a thousand pounds it seems to work.

Now I do not throw this all at them in one sentence. We do each individual step first. So they start by thinking of sinking their weight in their seat bones. We do a bit of trot, if they don't get it then I say think of peddling a bike backwards while sitting deep. Sometimes this works. Then I tell them to think of leaning back. And just keep building it from their. They almost always seem to get it by the time I have them picture peddling backwards.

I take reins away when learning sitting trot as it is when they seem to want to balance on the reins the most.
Before Health & safety kicked in they used to have bareback trotting races at gymkhanas and leaning back was the way to go if you wanted to win.
Obviously you have to know a correct seat position but if that involves perching on top of a horse afraid to move a muscle, bones so tight they'd snap if someone moved them then you'll only ever be a passenger.
I like your description of 'the heavy bum', I try to think of myself sort of melting into the horse, you develop a deep seat then you feel every movement and even though you're relaxed you're actually totally prepared for every move they make so if they do spook sideways or leap forwards you're still sitting in the saddle and with them and not hitting the ground where they once were
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post #109 of 110 Old 12-07-2012, 09:59 PM
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I agree with you that this "mass production" is happening ! I went to a riding school for a year where all we did nearly every sing lesson that costed 50$ AUS for 1 hour group lesson was jump 30-40 cm little jumps ! It was so boring ! OMG hundreds of dollars wasted ! Im glad I hardly went to that school after 1 year. I went back there to see if they were still really bad, and because my horse was injured, and there were riders there that had been in the same level for 2 YEARS !!!! Where still jumping the same hight maybe 5cm higher ? But it was practically the same teaching standards ! This is the closest riding school to the City in Melbourne (Aus) and a private lesson for 1 hour is nearly 100 $ !!! They are practically stealing !

The foolish reject what they see, not what they think,
The wise reject what they think, not what they see.
-Huang Po
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post #110 of 110 Old 12-08-2012, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5895...e_gdata_player
This is to demonstrate how handy a horse can be, even a rather big Lusitano, when ridden with the classical/Iberian methods
Off topic, I know, but I think bsms would enjoy that
I enjoyed it, will have to watch again, but I didn't see that horse gaping or resisting anywhere.
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