Lifting the back! - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Lifting the back!

This is a discussion on Lifting the back! within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    Like Tree14Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-04-2013, 11:25 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    I have been working on long and low with my mare. I use clicker training with my horse.(I know many of you don't care for C/T). I started just keeping contact, and when she dropped her head at all, I gave her more rein and C/T. She really caught on quickly, so now she goes around the arena 3 times long and low to get C/T. When she is really stepping under herself and rounding up, I C/T then too with extra treats to say "you nailed it!"
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-04-2013, 11:32 PM
      #22
    Trained
    I occasionally ride with carrot pieces in my pocket, and will give my horse a piece if he has given me a few really exceptional steps, particularly when starting new movements. But never as a bribery for basic work.
    Muppetgirl likes this.
         
        02-05-2013, 01:16 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Now I have a question, and not to be thread jacking but it seems like asking the dressage riders will be a good idea...my horse is gaited, how will I get her to travel in long and low when her natural gait is to foxtrot with her head up? I can only do long and low in a walk but I really want to improve on her back muscling so she can gait more effectively. I don't want to trot her because I still want to do more work with her sticking in her foxtrot, but in order for me to advance her from her foxtrot to her canter I need to do some muscling because she crossfires like you would not BELIEVE, so any other ideas for what I can do?
         
        02-05-2013, 02:01 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    So many horses are ridden with a dip in front of the wither, rather than pushing the ears forward and away from the rider - leading to a lot of these neck and wither issues.
    Kayty, I'm not sure I understand what you mean here. Could you explain a bit more please?
         
        02-05-2013, 07:31 PM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cowgirl928    
    now I have a question, and not to be thread jacking but it seems like asking the dressage riders will be a good idea...my horse is gaited, how will I get her to travel in long and low when her natural gait is to foxtrot with her head up? I can only do long and low in a walk but I really want to improve on her back muscling so she can gait more effectively. I don't want to trot her because I still want to do more work with her sticking in her foxtrot, but in order for me to advance her from her foxtrot to her canter I need to do some muscling because she crossfires like you would not BELIEVE, so any other ideas for what I can do?
    Unfortunately I have zero experience with gaited horses, so I do not want to give you advice and have it turn out ruining her gait.
    Perhaps ask your question in the Gaited Breeds section of the forum, or try in the English Riding/Horse Riding section as you will get a wider range of responses there. I am just a little leery of telling you to ride her forward, soften the jaw etc if that type of work is not suited to gaiting.


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FaceTheMusic    
    Kayty, I'm not sure I understand what you mean here. Could you explain a bit more please?
    When working correctly, the horse should stretch his whole neck, starting from the wither. The muscles right in front of the wither need to be reaching forward towards the poll.
    What we see very often however, is a neck that is ridden short and upright, not stretching evenly from wither to poll, which results in a 'dip' of the neck just in front of the wither.
    The same thing occurs when a horse travels with a hollow back - you will see a dip behind the saddle over the horse's loins.

    What happens when you ride for extended periods without allowing the neck to come out from the wither, is the top half of the neck, closer to the head, will bulk up, but the base of the neck will remain quite narrow. This is a tell tale sign of a horse that is ridden backwards from the hand rather than pushed into the bridle.
    My own horse used to just love sucking back at the base of the neck and 'faking' a frame. It took me a good few months from when I first purchased him, to develop him in such a way that he wanted to stretch from the wither to poll, rather than sucking back. Now he is building up that muscle at the base of his neck, and starting to develop that 'triangle' of muscles that is desirable in a correctly ridden horse. When he gets tense, he wants to revert to that drawn back, tight frame but those moments are getting less and less.
         
        02-08-2013, 07:38 PM
      #26
    Foal
    I don't see anything wrong with using a belly band to help your horse learn to lift his back. A belly band, combined with an improved headset, has proven to be a useful tool in aiding to the successful development of back muscle in many horses.

    Kayty, could you elaborate a bit more on how to encourage the horse to stretch his neck more? Everything you're saying about this being necessary is absolutely true, but it would be helpful to all of us if you'd kindly explain how to get the horse to stretch evenly, push them into the bridle, etc.
         
        02-08-2013, 09:10 PM
      #27
    Trained
    Ponyface, it is something that really needs to be worked on with someone on the ground, to tell you when the horse is stretching, in order to provide you with the feel you need to work on it alone.

    In essence, you want to think about pushing the ears out by riding everything towards them. So hands forward and elastic rather than holding or pulling back. There should be no backwards pressure on the bit.
    Ride the hind legs forward, and keep the horse with your back rather than allowing it to run out, through teaching half halts, and riding thousands of transitions. Its really a very mental thing, more so than any kind of complex 'method'. Just ride the ears away from you, and your body tends to do the work for you.
    Tessa7707 and FaceTheMusic like this.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Saddle STILL lifting :'( AnnaT Horse Tack and Equipment 3 07-30-2012 12:06 PM
    Cracking lifting sole shover12 Hoof Care 2 07-20-2012 11:07 AM
    ???hoof lifting??? lizzy12312 Horse Grooming 8 03-21-2012 04:38 PM
    Shoulder lifting taylorjane17 Horse Training 1 07-22-2010 07:55 PM
    Hoof Lifting Troubles ilyTango Horse Grooming 11 03-28-2010 10:33 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:29 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0