A little shaken - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 25 Old 12-25-2010, 08:29 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Oregon
Posts: 299
• Horses: 2
I just wanted to say I am a 34 year old returning to ride lady as well. The first time I asked my new horse to canter she bucked me off. I have to say the old confidence I had when I was younger was shaken. The fact that it happened in front of an Old Cowboy and he said, "You know what they say about falling out of an Australian saddle right? If you can't stay in an Aussie you shouldn't be riding" I tell ya, my bootie was not the only thing bruised at that point. Keep at it. Do what you love. :)
SidMit is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 25 Old 12-25-2010, 08:43 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: florida
Posts: 448
• Horses: 2
I really appreciate all the stories about similar instances. When I was young, at a summer camp, while cantering down a trail the horse behind mine got too close and my horse bucked out. I lost reigns and stirrups and was just holding onto her neck. Because the horses in front had no idea what happened, they kept going so my horse kept going too. The horse behind me must have gotten too close again and my horse bucked out again and off I went. I rolled for what seemed like forever! I had 'road rash' all up and down my stomach, split my lower lip which took 3 stitches to close, and broke my pinky finger. The next day when it was time to ride again I broke out in a cold sweat and burst into tears. I didn't feel like I was afraid to ride, I just felt like there were no 'safe' horses there to ride. I could think of something that happened with each one of them with other riders that made me feel unsafe around them. So I didn't ride for a week. Sat and read my book while others went out riding. Finally after a week I decided that the only one I felt comfortable on was the one that bucked me off, so I rode her again. We had a successful ride, even though that same **** horse got too close to her again and she made a small buck at him. I about ripped the head off of the person riding that other horse and told them to keep the hell away from my horse and that was the end of it. So, in one respect, I have that same feeling again...that there is something about each horse I've ridden there that makes me wonder if they are 'safe' to ride. But I have to remind myself that I've been riding there for 3 months or so and this is the first incidence I've had of being hurt. I guess my pride was hurt a little as well since there were so many people around, they didn't actually see me fall but they saw or were involved in catching my horse and saw me sitting at the mounting blocks waiting for them to come back. Everyone wanted to know what happened and was I ok. I just felt like saying 'yeah I'm the dumbass who lost control of my horse and fell off...thanks for asking'
rottenweiler is offline  
post #13 of 25 Old 12-29-2010, 06:58 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: florida
Posts: 448
• Horses: 2
Well it was definitely my helmet that crunched my nose. The adjustable strap that holds it in place was broken. It must have broken when I hit the ground. I noticed it today when I went out for another lesson, which was successful by the way...no falling off!
rottenweiler is offline  
post #14 of 25 Old 12-29-2010, 08:03 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 8,156
• Horses: 0
Well, I'm 43, and I don't bounce. If your horse ever bolts again in a large area, I highly suggest circling instead of the one rein stop. The one rein stop only works if you catch the horse in the very first strides of taking off. After that, it becomes a pulley rein situation which will save your butt, but it's really harsh on the horse's mouth.
Just a few weeks ago my brakes went out the aforementioned circle saved me. That along with sitting back and keeping my cool. It sucks, but once you give into the panic, gravity usually comes into play shortly after. I can say that I have come off twice at high speed and not gotten so much as a bruise. Ironically I think it's why I don't freak out when my horse gets strong. I know I can come off and not get hurt, so I don't worry about it so much as manage the idiot moments. We have all been there, so you definitely are not alone there!

You just have to see your distance...you don't have to like it.
MyBoyPuck is offline  
post #15 of 25 Old 12-30-2010, 10:03 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: florida
Posts: 448
• Horses: 2
I spoke with my instructor during my last lesson and explained what my 'thought process' was in thinking that the horse was being too forward and fast so I thought I'd circle him before the next pole and that's when she said he was on the wrong lead. So I didn't finish my circle, I let him go straight which is what took us out of our riding 'area' and when that didn't work I snatched up the reigns to see if I could just get him to STOP. I asked her what I SHOULD have done in that situation and she pointed out the obvious, once I had left the 'riding area' I should have circled him right (the lead he was on) when I was just thinking 'circle left' in my head. She said that the reason it happened was because he gets excited when he does flying lead changes and that he had already done a couple earlier in the lesson without me asking for them, so that's why he was being so forward. Then when I let him go out of the 'riding area' he got even more excited about 'where are we going now!?!' and that's why he took off
rottenweiler is offline  
post #16 of 25 Old 12-30-2010, 10:54 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,296
• Horses: 1
Do you have health insurance? If so, I say go for it!!! Ride and fall off a few times if need be........ it is not the end of the world and it makes you stronger when you get back on.

I was tossed off the slowest dopiest horse ever the other day.... as soon as I knew I was going off, I relaxed and sumersaulted over his neck. I got back on, a bit nervous, but still confident..... I had my helmet on as always. It is not the end of the world to fall off.....

I adjusted my stirrups and made him do the same thing he did not want to do just before he threw me, and it was successful.

Riding does not always mean you will stay on. I understand your fear. We all have it. But just go with it. It really will be okay :)

"Equine-facilitated therapy employs a form of biofeedback for practicing self-awareness, emotional management, and relationship skills that human role-playing exercises and discussion groups cannot begin to access." Linda Kohanov (The Tao of Equus)
Citrus is offline  
post #17 of 25 Old 12-31-2010, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: florida
Posts: 448
• Horses: 2
unfortunately I am self employed and do not have health insurance...that is one of the problems. I don't think it will keep me from riding though, not until I get REALLY hurt and my hubby says "I told you so"
rottenweiler is offline  
post #18 of 25 Old 12-31-2010, 11:00 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,921
• Horses: 6
my siister had an experience kind of like that she was only young and was learning to canter and the horse she was riding was normally very very lazy and anyway she was trying a canter and her horse took of at a very fast canter which my sister wasn't expecting so she lost her balence but instead of falling of sideways she somehow fell of forwards in front of the horse and somehow the horse managed to jump over her my sister was not hurt just very very very scared she blamed herself for the incident but she is all better now and is riding the same horse still!!!! (sorry that was so long)

Anyway you must love riding so don't question your age you can still ride for as long as you want !!!!!!!

Also lucky you didnt get really hurt!!

Pocket - 8 yr old, 15.1hh Thoroughbred Mare
~You know you're a horse person when you say 'whoa' to your dog~
Caitlinpalomino is offline  
post #19 of 25 Old 01-01-2011, 06:27 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 8,156
• Horses: 0
If it helps, I consider myself a fairly experienced rider, only have one horse who I know very well, and now that it's cold, his evil side has emerged and he's tried to run off with me the last 4 times out trail riding. My normal saint turns into a bucking/farting/head tossing lunatic when it's under 20 degrees. Sometime horses, even the sweet good ones, are total buttheads!!! Unfortunately you just have to keep at it until the management part becomes second nature, but I'm sure you'll get there. Sounds like you're initial instincts were good about how to stop, just a small brain fart about being able to circle both directions. It'll come.

You just have to see your distance...you don't have to like it.
MyBoyPuck is offline  
post #20 of 25 Old 01-01-2011, 07:37 PM
BJJ
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 64
• Horses: 0
I returned to riding in my fifties, and now at 60. I will tell you--you don't bounce like you used to but there is still some bounce left. My goal is to always maintain my balance and STAY on. The only time I have been injured is when I decided it was safest to jump than stay on and get bucked off!
BJJ is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome