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Losing stirrups

This is a discussion on Losing stirrups within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        10-10-2010, 08:42 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Could you set up a camera on a tripod?
         
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        10-10-2010, 09:44 AM
      #12
    Trained
    It isn't about pushing your heels down, every rider have different heel angles. That isn't the issue - what it is that you want to achieve is, allowing your heels to do their job which is = anchoring you.

    Think of it like this - a sailor will drop the boats anchor to keep the boat in place. To secure the boats position, to ensure that the boat doesn't float off or end up somewhere it shouldn't be.

    Now, put that with your heels. Your heels cannot anchor you in your tack, if you aren't allowing them to. Your bodies weight must beable to sink, remember gravity...from your head down into your heels for your heels to beable to aid in keeping your body solidified in your tack.

    You can only do that, by allowing the weight to naturally flow from top, to bottom. So back with the gripping and the pinching. Think of it this way - the weight flows from your head, into your chest, into your core, into your seat naturally......just tickity boo. From your seat, it is trying to flow down even more, into your lower leg...BUT if you, the rider blocks that flow from happening because you've gripped with your knees, or with your thighs or your calves.....you've blocked it from beable to sink down. So it stops at that pressure point you've created.

    Now your heels cannot do their job, because they aren't getting the weight flow they need to beable to anchor you in your tack - so you have to make a concious effort, to make sure you are allowing that weight flow to naturally take its course - from head, to heel.

    Make sure you aren't pushing your weight into your toes either - it's in your heels. Again, they don't have to be at a 90 degree angle, nor even a 50 degree angle, allow your body to do what it can do, the best it can do. Just so long as your heels are taking in that weight flow.

    There are many great books out there as well, to help you out with this dillema, focusing on exercises to strengthen you and your body parts to. You can get into pilates, bally ball exercises - there are many ways to help you out to strengthen your body so that you can be that much more efficiant while in your tack.
         
        10-10-2010, 01:05 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Great explanation. I like this; it helps me too. Gives me something to work on today. I am still trying to get really comfortable in the saddle. Sometimes I feel like I'm bouncing out of the saddle too much at a gallop...until the gallop is a full out run. But I think I grip to stay on and this causes tension, then I start bouncing because I'm too ridgid. I need to trust the gravity and stay deep in the seat...relaxed.

    Suggestions...?
         
        10-10-2010, 07:44 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Hey thanks for the advice, I have a question though, I understand I need to get my weight into my heels, but if it wasn't wouldn't there be other side effects? Like bouncing in the saddle? Legs moving up or forward? I haven't had an instructor point there things out (okay when I first rode english ...). But I am really trying last time I rode, so thanks for the advice and hopefully I'll see some improvement.
         
        10-10-2010, 09:08 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mooney    
    thanks for all the replies, a few of you probably are right, I can't put my weight into my irons. It is more a physical problem though, my ankles have no flexablity now after years of accidents and arithritis in them. Stretching has only brought back a small amount or use, and to much strain offend leads me not being able to walk well the couple days. I can't pinch with my knees, that would just about kill me if I hadn't taken pain relievers.

    Just out of high school and complaining about arithritis in all my joints. Lol. I'll try out some suggests.
    The next time you ride, when you trot try to think of moving your pelvis forward rather than standing up/sitting down. I found that when I thought of the post as me standing up, then sitting down, I was gripping with my knees a little too much (not even noticeable either, I honestly didn't think I was doing it!) and that was causing me to lose the stirrups. But when I stopped thinking about standing when I was posting, and pictured myself thrusting my pelvis forward instead, it kept me anchored better and actually made it much easier to post with the horse too
         
        10-10-2010, 09:26 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    David did you mean to quote my quote there? ;)
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        10-11-2010, 09:10 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    When my heels start coming up (more often than they should - years of bareback riding meant just letting my feet hang free), my instructor has me get up into the 2-point position and ride that way a moment. Then she tells me to sit down in the saddle without changing the position or feel of my legs.
    It works for me. Until I forget and they start coming up again
         
        10-14-2010, 09:24 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    So, I have an old ankle injury, and for the first time in a year of riding, I put my weight properly in my feet, and in the English saddle, it felt like I was sitting in a "chair" my legs were "locked"(not really but it felt like they were grounded) and I had balance! I wasn't leaning forward! I had FINALLY found the muscles needed! With no help from my idiot instructor who thinks because I can't find my muscles or do what she says I'm not "listening"(Gave her a heads up, if she doesn't start working with, and blaming everything on not listening and actually tries to find out why I can't do something, whether it be because I have no clue how to work those muscles, or nerves or etc. then I'm going to switch to another instructor) but back on topic, it HURT. My ankle HURT and caused me to not be able to use my leg properly. I need to work my ankle slowly to be able to fixate it in that position for long periods of time. So I find no stir-up work easier too. It would probably work for you like it works to me, you need to stretch your ankle, make it more flexible slowly, and at the same time, get it used to work, through various daily exercises.
         
        10-14-2010, 10:17 AM
      #19
    Foal
    I ride western and I lost my stirrup while galloping, and that was pretty scary for me. Hehe
         
        10-14-2010, 01:38 PM
      #20
    Foal
    My instructor says to imagine a rope from your belly button and somone is pulling and releasing, pulling and releasing. That helped me to use a more pelvis thrusting motion to post, rather than standing, sitting, standing, sitting. Which would cause me to lose my stirrups from time to time. Definitely think about keeping your weight in your heels. I don't think just because you don't have other symptoms (bouncing, legs coming up and forward) means anything. You could be good at keeping your lower legs quiet and in one place, but still not have your weight in the heels. MIEventer is giving you some really good advice and examples (I'll be thinking about that today when I ride, thank you very much!)
         

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