A love for the horse but fearful of broken bones.
   

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A love for the horse but fearful of broken bones.

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  • Have never broken bones horse
  • What bones break when horse riding

 
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    06-11-2009, 11:40 AM
  #1
Foal
A love for the horse but fearful of broken bones.

Every since I was a child I have had a love for horses. I got grown and the love is still there. I purchased my first horse to learn how to ride.(22 yrs. Old race horse) I had to learn or get hurt. He was a pacer and believe it or not I was told ohhhhh he's fine. Boy did I learn from that one. I kept him for about 1 year and then sold him. He was not what I need to learn on. After several year I decided I wanted another, I purchased an 8 month old TW. Saying that I could train him myself so I know what I would have and knowing what he have been through. He was broken and I was ready to ride. One day I got throwned. Scary blow to my poor feeling. It has scared me to the point that I have not gotten back up on him since. It has been 2 years of this fear and I am ready to break it. I need to ride my big baby. We are great on the ground but when my feet get in those stirr-ups I am shaking like a leaf. I know he can tell and I am trying but would love to have any advice to help me. He is totally broken and I have a neighbor that rides him every week but its my time for me to ride my own horse. I have trailer and all so I have invested too much to sit and watch someone else look good on my baby......Looking to break this fear.
     
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    06-11-2009, 01:17 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Well, A) you need to get a certified trainer and learn how to ride on a calm schoolmaster, not a 5 year old greenie. I don't think it was very smart to go out and buy a horse before you knew how to ride, and train. Then you could think about riding your own horse
     
    06-11-2009, 01:45 PM
  #3
Weanling
It's hard to forget a fall! My rule is: Never let fear make you afraid to live! We don't have a lot of time, and I don't want to have any regrets!
I never want to say "If only....". Don't sell yourself short - you have had some unfortunate experiences, but from here on it doesn't have to be that way! You could start with ground work - that helps you gain respect from your horse - I like Clinton Anderson, but other trainers use the same principles. I still work my horses from the ground - it's just plain helpful.
The harder you work at it, the more you will achieve and it will also boost your confidence! Maybe working with a trainer would help you rebuild your confidence, too - working in an arena and having someone there with you can help you to focus on improving your skills - they may be rusty, but you do have skills. You certainly have the desire - start building from there! You watch your friend ride your horse - THAT COULD BE YOU!
Start as slowly as you want - baby steps are fine! You want to ride your horse, and you will - think positive thoughts - you can't do anything about the past - put the negative thoughts to rest! Time has passed and it sounds like you trust your horse - that's a great beginning! A friend of mine used to go to McDonald's before we'd ride -- this is the TRUTH -- she would get a hamburger - a carton of milk and she'd take 1/2 Benedryl tablet BEFORE every ride to sooth her nerves!!!! She had a wonderful horse, but she would get herself so worked up and she was afraid her horse would pick up on it! That did help her -- today she is McDonald's/Benedryl free and she enjoys riding again! Might work for you!? You are almost there.....best of luck and COWGIRL UP!!!!!!!
     
    06-11-2009, 04:21 PM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for the encouragement It is great to hear and needed. I will be putting my feet in that stir-up this weekend and I am going to ride
     
    06-11-2009, 06:14 PM
  #5
Showing
I've been hurt too so I know your fears. I'm turning 52 this year so I don't mend or bounce as well as I used to.
Keep as safe as you can be, wear a helmet. Start out in a very controlled area. Think of it like drivers training in a car. You start off in a parking lot with your instructor and your seat belt. You can get hurt in a car easier than on a horse. But after awhile you are speeding down the freeway with the wind in your hair and not a care in the world.
As Luv 2 Trail said, take baby steps. Work on your breathing, do lots of positive imaging when your not riding. You'll get there
Its good that you have had this time to bond with your horse, but its time to climb aboard.
     
    06-11-2009, 06:34 PM
  #6
Weanling
After I was thrown the first time, ended up with a broken finger and 3 stitches in my lip, I didn't ride for a week. I told myself it wasn't because I was afraid to, it was because there were no 'good' horses to ride there (camp). After a week I sucked it up and got on the same horse that bucked me off. I was TERRIFIED, and my horse even bucked again - same situation that caused the first buck - but it was just a little buck and I held firm. After that ride I had my confidence back and was back to riding every day. I'll admit though, I get nervous on horses that act 'off' but I just try to take a deep breath and calm myself so it doesn't transfer to the horse. Just start slow and you'll be fine.
     
    06-11-2009, 07:43 PM
  #7
Trained
At 42, I don't bounce much either. I can however say, that the last two times I get dumped off my 16.2 TB, I didn't even get a bruise no less get hurt. Until then I didn't realize you could fall at high speed and not get hurt. It's fantastic. Just take your time, go at whatever pace your comfy with, and know you're not alone!
     
    06-11-2009, 08:01 PM
  #8
Showing
You've made two of the several mistakes that green riders make. A first horse, and especially one for someone doing it alone, needs to be a confidence builder. You need a kid safe horse in their teens or even in their early 20s.

A first horse needs to teach you, not one that needs to be taught. You can't teach a horse when you need to learn yourself.
     
    06-11-2009, 08:59 PM
  #9
Yearling
I do agree that you need a "steady eddie" type of horse. One that is forgiving of his riders faults...experience everything you can with this horse. Ring riding , then open spaces in fields , then trails, possibly a horse show environment get so used to doing this that you don't even think about the fear anymore.
If you can have your neighbor that is riding your horse continue to work with him , take him through lots of environments too, gain his confidence etc...
Then when you are ready to ride you will have more skills and he will be more confident too. Continue to work with him on the ground , that is also a great way to gain trust in each other and rapport.

I have been blessed to have 2 horses , both very different from one another...one I feel very confident on, my daughter rides him too and the other one is "my boy" but we have had a long go at. We still have much more to do...
I hope this helps some.....
     
    06-12-2009, 10:37 PM
  #10
Foal
Thanks you all for the support. I have no fear of Whistler on the ground. He give mw everything I ask for. I just have got to get my nerves together from the fall. Being 17 1/2 hh is a long way up. I am going to do this. Thank you all
     

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