My horse doesnt stop
   

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My horse doesnt stop

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  • My horse refuses to halt
  • Horses who don't stop

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  • 2 Post By Saskia
  • 1 Post By Scoutrider

 
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    10-22-2011, 03:37 PM
  #1
Foal
My horse doesnt stop

Hi, I have a lovely fjord mare, and she's great, but she just wont stop. She will slow down from canter to trot and trot to walk, but it's just getting her to stop I have trouble with. She understands the half-halt and slows down, but she just doesnt stop moving her feet, and she crosses her jaw and fights against the bit, she's just in a normal noseband. Does anyone have any ideas on how to get her to stop, and do you think a grackle noseband might help?
     
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    10-22-2011, 05:17 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Grackle noseband might help, but I don't think that is fixing the problem.

How is she on the ground? When you lunge her and call for her to halt does she stand still? When you are leading her will she stand still with you?

I would work with that first, ensuring that she halts and stands on the ground. Then I would walk around on her and ask for a halt. If she keeps walking I would do a very tight circle and ask for a halt again, and when she eventually halts I would ensure I would loosen the rein, not having a contact. If she steps of again, ask for a halt, them release.

Have you heard of the one rein stop? Basically its about teaching the horse to stop when turned tightly. Its taught on the ground first and I found that it can be helpful for training, and teaching a horse to stand. Once mine had learned it, when he wasn't standing still I would just start to bend the head to the side and he would stand. It might help you.
Tianimalz and palominolover like this.
     
    10-22-2011, 10:18 PM
  #3
Banned
I've been training a Fjord mare for a woman, and she doesn't like to stop, either. Same deal. They are remarkably stubborn and bracey, aren't they? I've gotten to where I just give her the whoa command, then haul back on her face until she completely stops (using a Myler combination bit with two rein sets), then an immediate release of pressure. Sounds backwards, but it's the only thing that's been even remotely effective. Now--when she feels like it--she will halt the moment I say "whoa." More work is needed, but I think we're finally making progress.
     
    10-23-2011, 06:51 AM
  #4
Foal
She does know the one rein stop, but it hasnt helped, I did try it for a while, then I tried stopping her and giving her a sweetie, that didnt work either. When im on the ground walking beside her she's good, and stops when I stop, but yeah Bubba13, i've found that I have to pull her in the mouth to get her to stop. I've only had her since may, and when she first came she stopped ok, I think she doesnt now because im asking a lot more of her, so yeah i'll try that and saying woah at the same time, thanks
     
    10-23-2011, 11:18 AM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelgem    
she does know the one rein stop, but it hasnt helped, I did try it for a while, then I tried stopping her and giving her a sweetie, that didnt work either. When im on the ground walking beside her she's good, and stops when I stop, but yeah Bubba13, i've found that I have to pull her in the mouth to get her to stop. i've only had her since may, and when she first came she stopped ok, I think she doesnt now because im asking a lot more of her, so yeah i'll try that and saying woah at the same time, thanks
If she stopped before, but doesn't now, then something changed. Several things can make a horse uncomfortable with stopping. Does her saddle fit properly? What kind of bit are you using? Is it the right size and adjusted correctly? In terms of bits and bridlework, I recommend a simple cavesson setup with a plain snaffle of whatever configuration (single joint, double joint, loose ring, full cheek, eggbutt... ) your horse prefers. A double jointed loose ring is pretty popular.

Next, horses don't stop doing simple, foundational movements because riders start asking more. Honestly, if your horse cannot halt, then your half-halts described above aren't true half-halts. Odds are that, if there is not a physical reason for your horse to refuse to halt, then either she never learned correctly or your aids are not allowing her to do so. I went through this with my own horse, who I bought as a greenie. He simply never learned, and at the time I knew little better than to pull on his mouth. I ended up in the same place you're describing - an ok "downshift," but that final transition from walk to halt was a battle.

Really deconstruct and analyze your halt aids. It takes the entire body, not just your hands. Ideally, you want to do this with a "handshake contact" on the reins, but you may need to start on a slack rein if she's very resistant to the bit. Really sit down, you want to feel like you're melting into the tack when you're ready to halt. You want to keep your legs in that "on but neutral" position in order to maintain forward energy - every movement is forward, including halts and rein-backs. Squeezing sends mixed signals, but you don't want to take your leg away. The final piece of the puzzle is the hands, but the key there is that they are simply closing, not pulling. Think about stopping the following motion of the head - that closes the door. Seat into legs into hands. Ride her into the bit, bring her up to the bit like riding her up to a wall. Don't try to bring the bit to her.

This combination of aids essentially allows the horse to come down into a lower gait or a halt. Using different aids hinders the horse, makes it harder for her to downshift. If your seat is still moving in-gait, then it is creating energy that resists the halt-motion. Squeezing legs reinforce the gait, disallowing the halt. Removing the legs loses contact (contact is about more than hands). Pulling back creates resistance and inverts the spine, making it biomechanically difficult for the horse to halt nicely.

Very often, our horses' little problems mirror our own. I personally found that when I started being a real stickler about my own position and application of the aids, a lot of the really frustrating little problems I was running into with Scout just went away. Good luck, and happy riding!!
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    10-23-2011, 01:25 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoutrider    
If she stopped before, but doesn't now, then something changed. Several things can make a horse uncomfortable with stopping. Does her saddle fit properly? What kind of bit are you using? Is it the right size and adjusted correctly? In terms of bits and bridlework, I recommend a simple cavesson setup with a plain snaffle of whatever configuration (single joint, double joint, loose ring, full cheek, eggbutt... ) your horse prefers. A double jointed loose ring is pretty popular.

Next, horses don't stop doing simple, foundational movements because riders start asking more. Honestly, if your horse cannot halt, then your half-halts described above aren't true half-halts. Odds are that, if there is not a physical reason for your horse to refuse to halt, then either she never learned correctly or your aids are not allowing her to do so. I went through this with my own horse, who I bought as a greenie. He simply never learned, and at the time I knew little better than to pull on his mouth. I ended up in the same place you're describing - an ok "downshift," but that final transition from walk to halt was a battle.

Really deconstruct and analyze your halt aids. It takes the entire body, not just your hands. Ideally, you want to do this with a "handshake contact" on the reins, but you may need to start on a slack rein if she's very resistant to the bit. Really sit down, you want to feel like you're melting into the tack when you're ready to halt. You want to keep your legs in that "on but neutral" position in order to maintain forward energy - every movement is forward, including halts and rein-backs. Squeezing sends mixed signals, but you don't want to take your leg away. The final piece of the puzzle is the hands, but the key there is that they are simply closing, not pulling. Think about stopping the following motion of the head - that closes the door. Seat into legs into hands. Ride her into the bit, bring her up to the bit like riding her up to a wall. Don't try to bring the bit to her.

This combination of aids essentially allows the horse to come down into a lower gait or a halt. Using different aids hinders the horse, makes it harder for her to downshift. If your seat is still moving in-gait, then it is creating energy that resists the halt-motion. Squeezing legs reinforce the gait, disallowing the halt. Removing the legs loses contact (contact is about more than hands). Pulling back creates resistance and inverts the spine, making it biomechanically difficult for the horse to halt nicely.

Very often, our horses' little problems mirror our own. I personally found that when I started being a real stickler about my own position and application of the aids, a lot of the really frustrating little problems I was running into with Scout just went away. Good luck, and happy riding!!
okay, thankyou, i'll really try and make sure im being clear with my aids and everything, I rode her today and she's a bit better out hacking than in the school, so it was okay. I don't think she was trained properly, there's a few things she can't do that a 9 year old should be able to do. Thanks
     
    10-25-2011, 01:38 PM
  #7
Weanling
When it comes to stopping, a good ol' western shank/curb bit arrangement is pretty hard to beat.... <Grinning and ducking>

Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelgem    
okay, thankyou, i'll really try and make sure im being clear with my aids and everything, I rode her today and she's a bit better out hacking than in the school, so it was okay. I don't think she was trained properly, there's a few things she can't do that a 9 year old should be able to do. Thanks
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