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post #1 of 8 Old 01-11-2011, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
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hi I am new don't have a horse or anyhting but I want to get into it. I want to ride the horse on trails with freinds and family. My reletives in Eastern Washington have horses and I was looking at what it would take time and money to get a horse and enjoy it. I am looking for a young QH gelding. If anyone can help me to understand what it is going to take to get a horse that would help me out a lot. Thanks Garrett
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post #2 of 8 Old 01-11-2011, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishhuntandride View Post
hi I am new don't have a horse or anyhting but I want to get into it. I want to ride the horse on trails with freinds and family. My reletives in Eastern Washington have horses and I was looking at what it would take time and money to get a horse and enjoy it. I am looking for a young QH gelding. If anyone can help me to understand what it is going to take to get a horse that would help me out a lot. Thanks Garrett

Hello and Welcome!

I would definitely suggest you go the route of leasing/lessons first. Some leases are very liberal, as in you can treat the animal just as you would one that you own, take him/her places or some offer off site leasing, keeping the animal on your property for the length of the lease.

I would probably start there, even though it is not EXACTLY what you want, yet, because it gives you a bigger picture of handling, care and all around issues that you might not have even though of yet.

Also, through your lease it will probably be a cinch to find the horse you'd like to own someday. You can talk to other horse owners, trainers, barn owners and they will probably have mile long lists of horses for sale.

Do you have your own property on which to keep your horse?

He knows when you're happy
He knows when you're comfortable
He knows when you're confident
And he always knows when you have carrots.
~Author Unknown~
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post #3 of 8 Old 01-11-2011, 01:28 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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I do not have a lot of land but my neighbor has let people keep there horses on their property before and they have a circle arena and stables.
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post #4 of 8 Old 01-12-2011, 09:17 AM
Showing
 
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Location: MD
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Garrett, welcome to the forum!

Horse is a big every day responsibility, but its worth it. Personally for trail riding and all around I'd look into been there done that type of horse (usually older, well trained, and as bombproof as possible). But it all depends on experience/preferences of course.
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post #5 of 8 Old 01-13-2011, 10:30 PM
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I too, would suggest an older horse. One that has been well trained, is sound and has no issues. A younger horse, if you are meaning 4 and under, may need more training than you can do on your own.

That can lead to frustration on both of your parts.

The advice about leasing is very sound, and I would also suggest trying to find a barn that would let you work there, as that is a good place to get experience, and you will find out if this is something you will really enjoy.

Good luck.
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post #6 of 8 Old 01-14-2011, 12:12 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
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Hi Garret, where in E. Wash do your relatives live? (I live near Seattle).
I lease a horse and it works well for both me and the horse's owner, who gets her horse excersized and I help pay the bills . Something to think about.
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post #7 of 8 Old 01-14-2011, 06:24 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New South Wales, Australia
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Time wise horses are a big commitment. They require daily supervision, and often daily feeding and rugging - so if you don't have the time for that you have to be able to pay someone to do it for you (like a boarding stable).

Also, you may need a fair few lessons before you can ride and handle a horse well enough to enjoy it. With English riding you are often looking at at least a year (riding once a week) before you are an adequate competency to ride without instruction, I would think Western riding would be similar but I don't know.

In addition to the time commitment horses can be quite expensive. Besides the initial cost you will need to buy tack, rugs and other gear which can easily cost $1000 and up. Also, depending on where you live you could spend between $5 and $100 a week on feeding. Agistment/boarding fees also vary. A farrier is required every 6 - 8 weeks, and a dentist yearly.

Lessons, followed by leasing, is a very good idea to get used to the costs and responsibilities of a horse. If you want to buy a horse its best to get an older, more experienced horse that you can learn on. A young one may be unpredictable, excitable or just not know what to do. When ridden by an inexperienced rider this can become dangerous.

Good luck.
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post #8 of 8 Old 01-14-2011, 07:25 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2009
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Welcome to the board.


You have been given some good advice.

Horses are a huge commitment, before you get one of your own why not see if you can experience some of the commitment.

Does the neighbor you state you can keep your horse at currently have any horses there? If yes, why not go over and offer to take over horse duties for a week (after you have been taught what to do).
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