Options For Leasing
 
 

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Options For Leasing

This is a discussion on Options For Leasing within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Is leasing a horse to ride worth it
  • If i lease a friends horse then can i still take lessons at my barn?

 
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    04-29-2012, 06:48 AM
  #1
Foal
Options For Leasing

First, hello, my name is Cassie, I am new here. :) I am a college student in the Midwest. I am going to college for either hippotherapy (occupational therapy with horses) or I will be getting into veterinary medicine.

Next, my background story to help you understand my situation better.
Aside from riding carnival ponies, I began riding horses when I was about 10 years old. I started out riding my friends horses, very occasionally through early high school. In high school, I had a handful of lessons with a friend of my mom's, but she moved not long afterwards.
At the end of high school, I began working for lessons. I worked at 3 different barns in about 2-3 years. They were either too far away or no longer needed my services.
I then began paying for lessons at two separate barns, two years apart. I had a handful of lessons at each. At the first one, I was learning posting trot at my last lesson. I then moved to NY and moved back to the Midwest a few months later. At the second barn, I was stuck on "walk" for every lesson. I got bored there.

Summer 2011 I started lessons at a new barn. At first, I liked this new barn. After a few lessons, it turned out to be group lessons. I prefer private lessons but that wasn't possible. I tried sticking it out there.
I experienced my first fall there.... It wasn't so bad, I got back on and have not developed a fear. Just an awareness :)
Eventually, I began feeling ignored and stopped taking lessons there.

What I know: catching a horse (except those hard to catch ones), grooming, hoof-picking, tacking up (sometimes still have troubles with how tight a saddle should be but with an attentive instructor, would easily learn that). I can walk, sit trot (easiest on a horse with a longer stride), steering, am in the learning stages still of posting trot (just need more practice). I have cantered on a horse once during a trail ride, it was wonderful! I can multi-task (I used to have trouble steering and thinking about what I was doing during sitting or posting trot).

At one place down the road, I used to ride an Arabian. He was fast and always wanted to trot, even if the rider didn't want to. I taught him to trot when I asked him to and could easily bring him back to a walk.... His owners just let him trot. I stopped riding there because it turned out he had arthritis and he was developed pain when ridden.


The question(s):

The place I learned best at was where I rode the Arabian. It was basically me taking everything I learned at all my previous lessons and just practicing. It was great. I have lost faith in the trainers around here.

I was wondering if anyone thought this plan would be feasible......
I was thinking about finding a beginner-safe horse to partial lease and use the horse as practice for everything I learned from previous lessons.
I would only do this after signing a release of course, and also under supervision. And I would explain to that owner what my situation is.
I have found very nice horse owners around here and I am sure it wouldn't be too difficult. Particularly with hobbyists, not with show horses etc.

I would love your opinions.
Thank you much :)
     
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    04-29-2012, 07:02 AM
  #2
Foal
I would like to add a quick note after re-reading my post. I would ideally love to partial lease a beginner-proof horse that I would use for practice. But in addition to that, I would also love to learn from a knowledgeable person (instructor or owner) things that I don't yet know. Basically, I wouldn't go out there and do things beyond my limits or knowledge.
Things I would later like to learn from a knowledgeable person include things like diagonals, tweaking proper cantering position, lead changes, etc.
     
    04-29-2012, 07:12 AM
  #3
Showing
After adding this part in, I think you have a solid feasible option. Now you just have to find a beginner safe horse to work with. Best of luck on your quest.

Have you leased before? Make sure you reaaaally read through the contract before you sign. You can ask on here for help if you need any.

Quote:
Originally Posted by horsecountrygal    
I would like to add a quick note after re-reading my post. I would ideally love to partial lease a beginner-proof horse that I would use for practice. But in addition to that, I would also love to learn from a knowledgeable person (instructor or owner) things that I don't yet know. Basically, I wouldn't go out there and do things beyond my limits or knowledge.
Things I would later like to learn from a knowledgeable person include things like diagonals, tweaking proper cantering position, lead changes, etc.
     
    04-29-2012, 06:06 PM
  #4
Foal
Thanks!
I have not leased before, thanks for the tips :)
I found one place that does beginner leases and requires one lesson a month. They're a little far but it would be worth it! :) If I can't find a closer place, I'll probably go there.

Cassie
     
    04-29-2012, 07:12 PM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsecountrygal    
Thanks!
I have not leased before, thanks for the tips :)
I found one place that does beginner leases and requires one lesson a month. They're a little far but it would be worth it! :) If I can't find a closer place, I'll probably go there.

Cassie
You're welcome, and that sounds like a good option though hopefully you won't tire of the long journey. Also one lesson a month is good.. but always take more especially when you're learning yourself :) My horse has always been about 45 mins away from me and it gets old fast (though I still love going!)

I am currently leasing my horse and wrote my own leasing document (urgh that was a major headache, all the legal mumbo jumbo lol!) so I have some experience with leases, plus I leased my current horse before he was mine but there was no contract just verbal agreement (NEVER EVER EVER DO THIS, OP!!!!!!! Make sure there is paper involved with a signature and rules, etc.!!!)

If you need help with particulars like the different kinds of lease or you don't quite understand something in the contract, feel free to ask me or members of the forum :)
     
    04-30-2012, 05:01 AM
  #6
Green Broke
While if you could find a true, quiet beginners-safe horse then you'd probably be okay, I think horses such as these are very rare, and even rarer for lease. Even if the owners tell you the horse is okay - it may very well not be.

In your position, I'd take some more lessons. Instead of spending money leasing and on board, why don't you take 2 or 3 lessons a week? Find an instructor you are happy with and be honest with your goals. With regular riding, having a solid trot (both posting and sitting) and canter shouldn't take that long at all, and you might be in a much better position to get a horse.
     
    05-01-2012, 03:51 PM
  #7
Foal
Thanks! Well as it turns out, there's a possibility I found a better opportunity. A local ranch 45 minutes from my house is hiring for a stablehand/ tour guide! They do trail rides, and this place is very popular and gets a lot of business. They will train new employees. I applied today and the guy gave me an interview on the spot. He said he'll get my information to the owner and I just need to wait for a callback. I let him know what my experience was. Even though it's so far, I would love to have this job! Working with horses all the time and getting paid for it? Definitely my kind of thing! :) Plus, it would be great experience for me. It's about 40-60 hours per week. :P
Cassie.
     
    05-02-2012, 05:50 PM
  #8
Foal
Congrats on the possible opportunity!

Assuming that doesn't work out, I think your best bet is to try a full or part lease through a school/lesson barn. Usually this means you'd have to take lessons at the barn with a trainer (requirements vary), but you'll be getting a nice, safe school horse with suitable riding facilities for not a lot of money. Most places usually charge 1/2 months board for a 1/2 lease and full board for a full lease, and some may charge you for shoes or trims. But that's about it.

Right now, I'm half leasing a wonderful little OTTB at my current barn. My half lease means I get him 1x during my lesson and 2x for free rides whenever. My trainer set up the lease for me and I know what I'm expected to pay every month. If any vet bills come up, they're her responsibility. And it's a month-to-month lease, so if I decide he doesn't work for me, I can just let her know and be done with it.
     
    05-02-2012, 07:26 PM
  #9
Green Broke
That job sounds like a great opportunity

If it doesn't pan out, I'd advise against leasing a horse at this point. This early on, it's really beneficial to ride a lot of different horses, as they will all teach you different things. Find a barn near you that offers lessons on well-behaved horses and just take a lesson once a week or every other week. You can also "rent" the lesson horses on an hourly basis for practice outside of your lessons at many barns.

Do the math to figure out when it makes financial sense to enter into a partial lease. At my barn, they charge $20/hour to ride without a lease, and $160/month for a half lease of one of the schooling horses. So, if you're consistently riding more than 2x per week, it's cheaper to half lease.

Make sure details of the lease are all in writing- including who pays for what (especially if the horse gets injured), what happens if the horse is injured long-term and can't be ridden, how much advance notice you have to give to get out of it, etc.
     
    05-03-2012, 03:54 PM
  #10
Foal
I did find a lesson barn about 40 minutes away that has beginner half-lease opportunities. Some require lessons, depending on skills etc. I decided if the horseback tour guide thing doesn't work out, I may decide to check that barn out. If I did go there, I would do the half-lease and take group lessons with it. The half-lease is $150 a month and it says in the info that the rider can ride whenever they want, I'm assuming exceptions is if the horse is used for lessons. Either way, I think that might be the way to go. Then I can take lessons and practice what I learned during the lessons whenever I would like. They have several leasing horses so I could switch it up so I can get experience on different horses. Something I'll have to think about. I've heard great things about this barn and had a friend/ co-worker that is friends with the barn owner/ trainer. She absolutely loved this place and had horses of her own, and I trust her judgement.
     

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