Proper Way to Lunge - The Horse Forum

 4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Flushing, MI
Posts: 925
• Horses: 1
Proper Way to Lunge

I wasn't exactly sure where I ought to put this, so it can be moved if needed. :)
Anyway. I was wondering what the proper, correct way to lunge is. I realize I've never really been taught what it is, just copied what my instructor does, and I'm not sure if that's what's considered correct. I usually lunge Rainy is just her halter, and occasionally with her saddle on, and I have a whip to encourage her to canter if needed. We lunge in a large, indoor arena, so I have trouble trying to make a real circle for her to stay in. Should the circle be rather large? Smaller? Medium sized? Is there a specific way to lunge her that I'm being clueless about? I've been told there are certain cues for walking, trotting and cantering, but I never really understood what they were/are. I have several videos of me lunging if you'd like to see what I'm doing right now, but now that I can find out how, I'm rather ashamed of what I'm doing presently. The videos probably make me look like a fool. Anyhow, any advice, tips, lectures are welcome. I'd just like to know exactly what to do, once and for all. Thank you!
*Passes out cookies*
horseluver2435 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:14 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Alabama
Posts: 87
• Horses: 0
I'm going to bump this for you since I myself have never been taught the correct way.
My OTTB will only lunge one direction... Counter Clockwise...Imagine that. Lol
AlabamaHorseMom is offline  
post #3 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:22 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,364
• Horses: 9
Here's what my trainer taught me:
Hold the lead rope in the direction you want the horse to go and if you have a whip, hold that in the other. When you want them to go, point high with the hand with your lead rope in it and encourage them with the whip if necessary. Immediately after they start moving, drop both hands into a relaxed position and don't encourage them (i.e. Kissing to them or using the whip) unless they slow down or something. When you want them to stop, bend down and stare at their hindquarters until they do so, this may take some time for them to learn. Then, switch hands with the rope and whip and continue. When you want the horsde to be done, stop them as already stated but don't let them walk towards you until you invite them in. When they stop, you ideally want them to turn towards you to the point you can see both of their eyes, but them not walk towards you.
HorseOfCourse is offline  
post #4 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:33 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 629
• Horses: 0
Longeing is an ART, that takes YEARS to perfect. It's about developing a vocabulary with your horse that will translate to under saddle work. It's about showing your horse how to move correctly w/o the burden of a rider.

Unfortunately, to explain it to you would require I write a book, because even just covering the basics is really just enough information to get you into trouble.

You're best to pick up a book with explanations and illustrations. I believe Reiner Klimke wrote a book on longeing and that would be one of your best resources.

You'll need proper equipment to start: longeing cavesson, proper length longeline (at least 30ft), and a longeing whip.

You'll have to learn how to hold the longeline, how to cue different things with the longeline, what the whip cues are, where to position your body for various cues and so on...

Then there is the verbal cues that must be learned and applied correctly, and finally how you 'use' your body to affect the horse. How opening and closing the hips affects the horse, how to collect yourself to collect the horse and so on.

Finally, longeing 'may' be done on a circle, but a good trainer will longe on straight lines, serpentines, diagonals, as well as circles of varying sizes depending on what is being asked of the horse.

So you see, it's rather involved and gets more involved when you begin to long line.
Foxhunter likes this.
Mercedes is offline  
post #5 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:39 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 629
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by HorseOfCourse View Post
When they stop, you ideally want them to turn towards you to the point you can see both of their eyes, but them not walk towards you.
No you don't. You want the horse to stay on the circle, facing in the direction of travel, one ear on you and to stand quietly while you approach the horse.

This 'turning' toward the person is a habit developed from NH and those guru's, and has no place in longeing.

The ONLY time you will ask a horse to turn toward you when longeing, is if you are performing a change of direction, which is an advanced maneuver. The horse turns and comes towards the person, at the same time the person moves towards the horse's opposite shoulder,moves the longe whip and line to the opposite hands, flips the ring on the longeing cavesson, etc.. etc., all in one sweeping motion never affecting the horse's tempo, cadence or frame.
Foxhunter likes this.
Mercedes is offline  
post #6 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:49 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,695
• Horses: 3
^^ I have my horse turn in too, & its not just a 'NH thing' [sorry I know a lot of people who don't do or know 'NH' that have their horse turn in]

I don't see how that is incorrect at all, just a preference. My mare knows when its ok to walk in [i have a signal for it] & unless I tell her she doesnt.

Gypsy & Scout <3
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
gypsygirl is offline  
post #7 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:50 AM
mls
Trained
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: MN
Posts: 5,464
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercedes View Post
The ONLY time you will ask a horse to turn toward you when longeing, is if you are performing a change of direction, which is an advanced maneuver. The horse turns and comes towards the person, at the same time the person moves towards the horse's opposite shoulder,moves the longe whip and line to the opposite hands, flips the ring on the longeing cavesson, etc.. etc., all in one sweeping motion never affecting the horse's tempo, cadence or frame.
Ah no. It is not an advanced maneuver. Very basic. Work on the lunge line needs to be done in both directions. The horse does need to stay at the end of the line and NOT come in toward the handler. I train to the horse to respond to the verbal cue "reverse". Works for the line and free lunging.

I will agree correct and effective lunging is an art. Timing and coordination are very important. But I disagree that it takes years to perfect.
mls is offline  
post #8 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:51 AM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Flushing, MI
Posts: 925
• Horses: 1
Wow. Okay. :) Well, I'm just doing it to exersize Rainy, I'm not trying to be all advanced with it. I do have a better idea, I suppose, of what I need to do. But still, are there any other ways to just lunge your horse in a circle? Without getting overly technical and specific?
horseluver2435 is offline  
post #9 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 11:55 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 629
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsygirl View Post
^^ I have my horse turn in too, & its not just a 'NH thing' [sorry I know a lot of people who don't do or know 'NH' that have their horse turn in]

I don't see how that is incorrect at all, just a preference. My mare knows when its ok to walk in [i have a signal for it] & unless I tell her she doesnt.
It DID originate in NH. Prior to NH, nobody knowledgeable every allowed their horse to do that.

When you've advanced beyond the most basic level of longeing, it'll become clear why you never have the horse turn to you.
Mercedes is offline  
post #10 of 60 Old 02-10-2010, 12:02 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 629
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseluver2435 View Post
Wow. Okay. :) Well, I'm just doing it to exersize Rainy, I'm not trying to be all advanced with it. I do have a better idea, I suppose, of what I need to do. But still, are there any other ways to just lunge your horse in a circle? Without getting overly technical and specific?
That's the whole point, it is 'technical' and it's become a dying art form used simply to burn off steam before bravely mounting.

The circle is of no use to the horse gymnastically if it's not done 'technically' correct. All that does is torque the horse's legs and encourage bracing and stiff muscles.

Longeing is of little use to the horse and rider partnership unless it's done 'technically' correct.

You may choose to carry on as you are...many do. But the path to better horsemanship and horse management, and thus better understanding of the horse, thus a better relationship with the horse is learning all aspects, even those that seem daunting at first glance.
Foxhunter likes this.
Mercedes is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To lunge or not to lunge, that is the question! melinda27858 Horse Training 51 01-17-2011 09:00 PM
Proper Feeding? lauralynnee Horse Health 0 12-21-2009 11:53 PM
Head-Set - Proper or Not? Dodger Horse Training 14 10-29-2008 11:02 AM
Is it proper? .Delete. Horse Tack and Equipment 9 03-19-2008 12:16 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome