Rearing Tips? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 12:59 AM
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Originally Posted by farmpony84 View Post
I didn't say "nothing" about a $50 stick... My horse rears rather then buck. I think it takes less effort for him....
I hope you didn't thing anything in my post was directed at you because it wasn't.

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post #12 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 01:13 AM
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100% ditto

Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
Horses want to get along with us they don't disobey because they don't want to do what we are asking. Most of the time they just aren't understanding what they are being ask or they have not had an appropriate release for doing what we want so they have given up. Rearing is the horse equivalent of screaming and flailing your arms in panic. A horse doesn't want to rear but they feel like they need to do something and they don't know what else to do.

If everybody is telling you he is dealing with being bored by rearing then they are wrong and painfully ignorant of how a horse thinks. If you get your horse to disengage his hindend from the ground and in the saddle and get lateral and vertical flexion then there will be very little rearing and bucking. You don't have to chase your horse around a pen with a 50 dollar stick to fix these things either. You need to be able to move your horses feet around and break the pattern in his mind that causes a rear.
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post #13 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 02:29 AM
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I bought a Paint mare once who came with an older gelding and she was so buddy sour that she wouldn't leave the property and would rear. I took it as her way of "throwing a temper tantrum." She scared me really bad and I just couldn't live with the behavior.

I had another horse (an Arabian) who would do small rears and "airs above ground" but it was just exuberance and feeling spirited. That didn't bother me and I rode him and loved him until the day he died.

I guess to me it matters if the horse is doing it to intimidate me (I feel the first horse was) or if they just have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and can't keep their feet in one place (the Arabian).
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post #14 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 01:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for the posts...

He doesn't do it that often, but he still doe's it. He IS part Arabian I must say. The people who ride with me say it is boredom, and I agree with kevinhorses for the most part. He's saddle doe's it propally, I got it checked, I am just starting to think he doe's it because of high spirits...

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post #15 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
I hope you didn't thing anything in my post was directed at you because it wasn't.
I actually DID think you were picking on me! I have gotten to where I always start my statements by ruling out fear and pain because if I don't I get in trouble with some of the NH folks. You see, to me, ruling things like fear and pain out are common sense...

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post #16 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 03:36 PM
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Soda rears on occaision or at least he did a couple times last year. For him its more of a "I want to go faster but I can't so I'll go up" and it always happens (happened) when we were on the way home and he wanted to go significantly faster than I did (I very rarely go above a walk on the way home). Still it's a frustration thing, so I've tried to deal with it by removing the reason he is frustrated. Or at least teaching him that there are better ways to deal with it.

When I feel him getting ready to rear I immediately ask him to move his hind end (pivot) which puts weight ON his front end so he cannot rear. I think it helps because it gets him thinking/doing something other than rearing and it gets his attention back on me. This is a split second thing literally the second I feel him starting to bunch up. I practiced this in a safe area before taking it out on a trail. Also, I incorporated other strategies to deal with the barn sour attitude and to teach him that walking home on a loose rein is the quickest way to get there.

Last thing. When I'm on a horse that rears I don't try to do anything when their up in the air. My first instinct (since my first rear 15 or so years ago) is to lean forward and my hands go up their neck. I don't put any pressure on the reins or backwards with my body. Other people may have better ways to ride out a rear, but that's always worked for me.
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post #17 of 24 Old 02-01-2010, 09:56 PM
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Some horses do end up rearing to get out of work if the situation is handled in a certain manner. Sure, it never starts out that way. I agree with kevinshorses that horses rear the first time 100% out of panic or confusion. BUT, if the person riding them gets off immediately and walks them back to the barn because they're scared to get back on - the horse may associate rearing with getting to go back to the barn and not having to work, and then it becomes a habit. Most likely that confusion is still there, but at a certain point the rearing may not even be triggered by a confusing cue from the rider anymore. I've known a few horses that were like this. But yes, most horses who rear are confused or panicked.
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post #18 of 24 Old 02-02-2010, 01:12 AM Thread Starter
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Are there any tips to ride out of a rear? Or should you just go with it?

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post #19 of 24 Old 02-02-2010, 03:04 AM
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Why do Arabians always get blamed for bad behavior? It's not his fault he's smarter then his rider!

When a horse rears, you essentially want to stay as still as possible. Bring your hands forward on his neck, and stay close to his body. If a horse gets to the point where he's actually going up on me, I wait for his front hooves to brush the ground before I clobber his backend. Unless you're riding a confirmed man-killer, all horses will leap forward. A forward moving horse cannot rear. Hence, why I very rarely ever find myself on rearers, but if they manage to get up, this is the action I take as they come down to reprimand and move them forward.

Don't ever try cracking eggs on his head or smacking him on the head. Regardless of how many times this HAS worked, there are probably equal number of times the horse has come close to killing his rider when he freaks and goes over backwards that we never hear about.

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post #20 of 24 Old 02-02-2010, 03:28 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj View Post
Why do Arabians always get blamed for bad behavior? It's not his fault he's smarter then his rider!

When a horse rears, you essentially want to stay as still as possible. Bring your hands forward on his neck, and stay close to his body. If a horse gets to the point where he's actually going up on me, I wait for his front hooves to brush the ground before I clobber his backend. Unless you're riding a confirmed man-killer, all horses will leap forward. A forward moving horse cannot rear. Hence, why I very rarely ever find myself on rearers, but if they manage to get up, this is the action I take as they come down to reprimand and move them forward.

Don't ever try cracking eggs on his head or smacking him on the head. Regardless of how many times this HAS worked, there are probably equal number of times the horse has come close to killing his rider when he freaks and goes over backwards that we never hear about.
Don't worry - I don't smack him or anything... Umm I'm pretty smart by the way! I know he doesn't mean it or anything but yeah I only came here for help cos of what others were saying, I don't particulary want to get bashed...

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