ridding young horses - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 19 Old 11-10-2009, 06:54 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 8,175
• Horses: 3
Ahh you're typing is making my eyes go crazy, been at work since 6.30am haha, quit with the captials and everyone else will love you for it haha ;)
Kayty is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 19 Old 11-10-2009, 08:11 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 6,179
• Horses: 4
^ I was just thinking the same thing!

wild_spot is offline  
post #13 of 19 Old 11-11-2009, 12:36 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,122
• Horses: 24
Yep, it's kindof a fine line between cautious/aware and nervous and for a first time trainer, the line gets blurred. Relax and try not to be nervous because the horses will feel it. However, don't let your guard down even for one second cause they can feel that too and some horses will take advantage. That is something that has to be learned in time; how to be cautious without being scared, and how to be alert and ready without being jumpy. Relax but stay alert.

You said you were planning on riding one of them today. Did you get it done and if so, how did it go?

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #14 of 19 Old 11-11-2009, 11:13 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: South Africa.
Posts: 1,168
• Horses: 3
That's great that there are some young horses for you to ride. It is always good experience to ride some younger horses. Also, when you teach them something successfully, it gives you this feeling of satisfaction. Good on ye! = D

When you ride a younger horse, ride them like you would any other horse. And don't get nervous. BREATH. RELAX. ; )

*~ THE HORSE STOPPED WITH A JERK, AND THE JERK FELL OFF -- Jim Culleton ~*
MANURE HAPPENS
flamingauburnmustang is offline  
post #15 of 19 Old 11-11-2009, 01:11 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Ireland
Posts: 753
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot View Post
^ I was just thinking the same thing!

I'm sorry!

a silent night,wen friends are few,I close my eyes nd tink of u.A silent night,a silent tear,a silent wish dat u wer here♥ Is maith liom cŕca milis:) lol
xLaurenOscarx is offline  
post #16 of 19 Old 11-11-2009, 02:19 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Orange County, NC
Posts: 6,178
• Horses: 5
Depending on how young and their size/weight, be prepared that they won't have the balance and strength of more mature horses, so they typically are much more sensitive to shifting your weight in the saddle.

On the sixth day, God created the Quarter Horse.
On the seventh day, he Painted the good ones.
PaintHorseMares is offline  
post #17 of 19 Old 11-11-2009, 03:24 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 5,455
• Horses: 1
If you get stuck on something (like they won't back up or sidepass) get them to make a small try at it then give them the next day off. I think they must spend all thier time thinking about it because when you get back on them they seem to get it figured out. That's been my experience any way. Let's have a progress report.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
kevinshorses is offline  
post #18 of 19 Old 11-11-2009, 11:30 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 586
• Horses: 1
When you ride younger horses, keep things interesting!
Babies have really low attention spans and if all you do is go around the arena in the same circle, they will get bored and find ways to make your ride more fun (ie. Bucking, rearing, spooking, etc). Young horses need tons of different exercises to keep thier mind on the job and not on trying to make things more interesting for them. I'd suggest doing tons of transitional work (walk-trot, trot-halt, halt-canter, etc), circles and serpitines. This will keep them thinking and trying to figure out "what's my next job" instead of "what shall I do next to have fun".
If you hit a roadblock with one of the youngsters, don't try and push it. They can only handle so much and they only know so much. Chances are they don't know what your asking in the first place, either because you aren't asking right or they haven't been taught it. So don't get mad because they don't do it perfectly the first time. If they do even one small thing right, reward and move onto something different. Remember, babies get bored. So work on one thing for only a small amount of time, move on and come back to it later. Their brains can only handle so much. :]


:: rachel && robbie ::
:: http://www.youtube.com/user/blushedx3 ::
blush is offline  
post #19 of 19 Old 11-12-2009, 05:20 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: South Africa.
Posts: 1,168
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by blush View Post
Their brains can only handle so much. :]
Soooo true! LOL. I know that through experience! = D

*~ THE HORSE STOPPED WITH A JERK, AND THE JERK FELL OFF -- Jim Culleton ~*
MANURE HAPPENS
flamingauburnmustang is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hackamore and young horses....... need information... CopperHorse Horse Training 9 09-27-2009 03:15 PM
What type of bit do you use for your young horses? shermanismybaby3006 Horse Training 11 11-20-2008 03:42 AM
what are you winter ridding tips? KANSAS_TWISTER Horse Talk 0 10-23-2007 08:54 PM
Confo/Ridding Critique devinn Horse Riding Critique 9 09-11-2007 07:02 PM
joint supplements for young horses futolympeventer327 Horse Health 1 05-01-2007 08:40 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome