Riding a horse with hypp
 
 

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Riding a horse with hypp

This is a discussion on Riding a horse with hypp within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • HYPP in the horse show world
  • Can an hypp horse be good riding horse

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    12-20-2011, 09:06 AM
  #1
Banned
Riding a horse with hypp

What are the pros and cons of riding a horse with hypp n/h?

I'm considering free leasing an ex halter app and I don't currently know it's status. If it's n/h, I don't really think I would ride the horse. Just having something to play with.
If it's h/h, I probably won't do the lease at all.
But if the horse is n/h, are there any signs I should watch for if I do decide to ride?
     
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    12-20-2011, 09:44 AM
  #2
Yearling
Horse HYPP

Generally, it seems heterozygous (n/h) are less severely affected by this disease than are homozygous (h/h) horses. However, they can all suffer from sporadic muscle tremors and paralysis. With no way of knowing when and where and episode will strike, I would not ride a horse with hypp.
     
    12-20-2011, 11:56 AM
  #3
Showing
I have to agree, I wouldn't be riding a horse that has it as well. Riding a healthy horse shows its own risks as is, let alone one with such a serious condition.
     
    12-20-2011, 12:30 PM
  #4
Yearling
I do not completly agree because I know 2 horses who are HYPP positive and are ridden. They do require alot more care but it depends on how sensitive the horse is. Talk to the owner and the vet.
     
    12-20-2011, 12:55 PM
  #5
Trained
Just keep in mind that a horse who is N/H can still be effected enough to have seizures and fall. If he lands on top of you, it's really not pleasant. BTDT and I wasn't even riding, just grooming at a show. I wouldn't even think of riding an N/H horse.
     
    12-24-2011, 02:16 PM
  #6
Yearling
Plenty of N/H horses are ridden and shown under saddle everyday. As a matter of fact, a western mare at this year's AQHA World Show won a title or two and she's N/H. If you maintain an N/H horse with the correct food etc, AND exercise...which is was an N/H horse needs, then you are ahead of the game. And actually, MOST attacks occur when the horse is at rest.
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    12-27-2011, 09:34 AM
  #7
Weanling
I have to disagree as well, there is a HYPP horse that is ridden often where I board, he is very athletic and you would never guess he has HYPP. His owner is just very careful about how much water he drinks and what he eats. But aren't most horse owners really anal about that stuff anyways?
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    12-27-2011, 10:25 AM
  #8
Weanling
I would not ride an N/H horse either, or lease one. There are SO many horses out there without any genetic issues, why knowingly take on the burden of one that needs to be micromanaged to be usable? *shakes head* and why folks keep breeding them is beyond me.....
     
    12-27-2011, 10:32 AM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
Just keep in mind that a horse who is N/H can still be effected enough to have seizures and fall. If he lands on top of you, it's really not pleasant. BTDT and I wasn't even riding, just grooming at a show. I wouldn't even think of riding an N/H horse.
This. I've seen it happen firsthand to a very dear friend who won't ever have children because of it. It was horrifying to watch, he had the attack in the middle of a wp class.

I wouldn't ever think of riding an N/H horse myself because I've seen what can happen. That's just not a chance I'm willing to take.
     
    12-27-2011, 03:31 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters    
This. I've seen it happen firsthand to a very dear friend who won't ever have children because of it. It was horrifying to watch, he had the attack in the middle of a wp class.

I wouldn't ever think of riding an N/H horse myself because I've seen what can happen. That's just not a chance I'm willing to take.
I'm sorry about what happened to your friend! Did she have her horse on an HYPP-based diet, keep the Kayro syrup on hand etc? Granted the Kayro syrup is for emergencies when an attack happens, and if you are riding when an attack DOES happen...then it's hard to get the Kayro in right away. But if you follow strict guidelines with an N/H horse, it CAN lessen the chances of an attack.

Personally, I would not own an N/H horse for the mere reason that I'm not an Impressive fan to begin with. It's not a bloodline I look for in my performance horses which has nothing to do with the HYPPP issue.
     

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