Riding right vs. riding easy (spinoff from "New Headset" thread) - Page 2
 
 

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Riding right vs. riding easy (spinoff from "New Headset" thread)

This is a discussion on Riding right vs. riding easy (spinoff from "New Headset" thread) within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        02-07-2013, 11:10 PM
      #11
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gottatrot    
    Part of riding right is being a sympathetic rider. If you ride different horses, then you not only need to ride correctly and in balance, but you also need to adjust your style for where each horse is within their training and also by their personality.

    For instance, I might get on a warmblood that has had professional training for many years. His comfort zone might be that I keep him balanced and on my aids, and keep up a fairly constant communication between us. Yet I might get on another horse that was used for fast Western work and he may think that every time I use an aid that he must figure out what I want and respond instantly. This horse will not be able to relax if I keep communicating with him, so I must back off and only "talk" when I am asking him to do something.

    So many people think that you can ride every horse the same way, but I've found that I can't even ride my own horses that I've trained myself the same way as each other. Part of riding right is using your brain every time you ride in order to figure out what is right for this horse at this particular time.
    Thank you - this is exactly what I was trying to say, I'm so terrible with words.
    There is no one 'correct' way to ride a horse. There's less obtrusive, less aggressive ways, but not all are right or wrong.
         
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        02-07-2013, 11:17 PM
      #12
    Started
    I think the ultimate goal should be that riding right is the easy way.
    PunksTank likes this.
         
        02-07-2013, 11:30 PM
      #13
    Started
    Neverminding this. Irrelevant to the topic at hand.
         
        02-08-2013, 12:08 AM
      #14
    Trained
    My train of thought, is that with each new horse you work with, you ruin it a little less than the last. None of us on this forum are perfect riders, in fact, no rider world wide is 'perfect'. At the basic level, it is easier to define good and skilled riding. When you get to a higher level, there are so many more differences of opinion in how a horse should travel.
    Think of it like a tree. Your foundation is the trunk, as you climb the trunk it branches off into 4 or 5 sections, all of which branch off into another 4, and all of those another 4, so on and so forth.

    I am someone who WANTS to ride right. I think that I am now on the right track, but every time I get too comfortable, I get a new piece of information that changes how I ride. I am never stagnant in my riding, always willing to change, to accept new ideas and try them out. If they don't work on one horse, I'll try them on the next.
    Riding is something that is continually growing, there is yet to be a 100% Dressage test at any level - it gives every Dressage rider something to aim for!

    I work off the horse to improve my riding, I'm at the gym 5 days a week, running, cycling, weights and more core work than you can imagine! In the saddle, I regularly ride without stirrups, or reins in one hand, or with a whip under my hands, behind my elbows etc.
    There is no time to celebrate if you want to ride 'right'. If you stop to celebrate for more than a moment, you'll miss the train to the next stage of training. You cannot allow yourself to get blinded by a moment of success.
    Today, I FINALLY rode the best canter-walk transition I've ever had on Spighi. The half halt came straight through my back, he shifted onto his haunches, I was able to ride with next to no contact, breathe out, and hoorah, straight to a beautiful, balanced walk.
    GREAT!
    But tomorrow I want to do it better!!!!
         
        02-08-2013, 12:24 AM
      #15
    Showing
    Man oh man... I've just recently (as in a year ago) got back into riding "seriously" and just in the last few months have started riding with a GP coach to further myself. Riding is a great passion of mine, and I'm very serious about furthering my career. I've re-learned that to ride correctly isn't easy, and Ronan is a horse that would prefer to sleep than move, which makes for a tough ride. I am more than willing to learn and further myself though... Maybe I'll get brave enough to post photos for critique at some point. Ha.
         
        02-08-2013, 12:56 AM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gottatrot    
    Part of riding right is being a sympathetic rider. If you ride different horses, then you not only need to ride correctly and in balance, but you also need to adjust your style for where each horse is within their training and also by their personality.

    For instance, I might get on a warmblood that has had professional training for many years. His comfort zone might be that I keep him balanced and on my aids, and keep up a fairly constant communication between us. Yet I might get on another horse that was used for fast Western work and he may think that every time I use an aid that he must figure out what I want and respond instantly. This horse will not be able to relax if I keep communicating with him, so I must back off and only "talk" when I am asking him to do something.

    So many people think that you can ride every horse the same way, but I've found that I can't even ride my own horses that I've trained myself the same way as each other. Part of riding right is using your brain every time you ride in order to figure out what is right for this horse at this particular time.

    Here! Here! Bravo!
         
        02-08-2013, 01:26 AM
      #17
    Trained
    You still have to ride correctly on different horses, but yes, you do have adjust your aids accordingly. I would like to think, in fact I know, I ride better & better as time passes and I take more lessons, more clinics. One of the things I find so intriguing about riding & showing, is that you keep trying for perfection but can never reach it, you just improve a bit more.
         
        02-08-2013, 01:52 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    Reading through this thread (great idea, by the way), the word "dynamic" comes to mind. To me, riding "right" has a lot to do with having the ability to constantly evaluate, reevaluate and adjust your riding. The riders I admire the most are the ones who are highly adaptable, and who recognize that there is always a better, more efficient way to approach the way they ride. You don't get very far by being stagnant.
    Cat, gottatrot, Cinder and 1 others like this.
         
        02-08-2013, 05:42 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    I like that idea of being a "dynamic" rider.

    Kayty is right, there is no such thing as a perfect rider and none of us will ever reach that goal of perfection we are striving for. Yet we can all have an ideal that we will improve the horses we ride. Maybe I will only ride a particular horse one time, but on that one ride I can try to show them something that will help them as they go on. I can show them that sometimes a rider will listen to the horse. I can show them that they can walk for a few strides when they are excited, or that they can rock back and balance when going down a steep hill, or that they can continue in a steady rhythm and just relax.

    Of course sometimes we will make mistakes and give a horse a bad experience instead of a good one. But for myself, this is an ideal I have. It is a much nicer feeling to get on horses and feel that they are having a two way conversation with you than to get on horses and feel that they are apprehensive about what you might be planning to do to them.
         
        02-08-2013, 09:53 AM
      #20
    Trained
    My signature line is one that I think defines good riding:

    "...there are only two criteria of your position;
    a) are you in fluid balance and rhythm with your horse or not?
    b) does your seat enable you to control your horse efficiently?"
    - V.S. Littauer

    It isn't a style, and it isn't a position. One of the things I liked about VS Littauer is that he says riding is about MOVEMENT. If you stay on your horse, don't interfere with the horse's needs, maybe even help your horse keep his balance while under you, and you can signal him the way you both understand...THAT is OK riding.

    And for a lot of riders, that is all they need. A pleasure rider who rides their horse 1-2 hours/week may well be content with stop / go/ left / right. Lots of horses are content with that as well.

    I ended up buying a mare who isn't content with OK. And my personality isn't content with OK either. I want to do more and learn more and get better...even if that isn't obvious in any pictures of me riding!

    Littauer had a 3 tier system for training. If someone's goals were simple, he taught them simple commands and didn't worry if that might not work in Olympic competition. There was a mid level system for those who rode daily, and the top tier was for those who wanted to compete. That makes sense to me.
    Beling likes this.
         

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