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post #11 of 25 Old 11-20-2013, 04:28 PM
Yearling
 
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People use both barn and stable, but more often barn.

Most of the time we use paddock for a small fenced in area, often grassless, and pasture for a larger grass field.
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post #12 of 25 Old 11-20-2013, 04:36 PM
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I'm in Australia, our horses live in "paddocks" and we ride in arenas. A yard to us is just a small enclosed area to keep a horse, usually not too much bigger than a stable.

A stable to us is literally the individual stable or "stall", stables refer the stable block, not the property.

Agistment isn't really boarding here, because we have boarding as well. Boarding includes extras, like feed or someone who cares for the horse, like feeding it daily and cleaning the stable. Agistment is just paying to keep your horse somewhere, they take care of the fences and provide water, but you feed and care for your own horse.

We go on "trail rides" and if some does "hacking" it means they compete in sort of "standard" shows with turn out, horse, led and rider classes.

We have floats not trailers. We rug, we don't blanket. We use halter for rope and webbing halters, "bridle" for anything with a bit.

And we never call them "Aussie Saddles" just stock saddles and they never have horns.
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post #13 of 25 Old 11-20-2013, 04:40 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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Location: Suffolk, England.
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We don't say Boarding, we say Livery.

We could do full livery (everything done for you) part livery. Or DIY livery (using someone else's property but basically doing everything - feeding, turn out etc, yourself.
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post #14 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TessaMay View Post
People use both barn and stable, but more often barn.
Maybe a regional/cultural thing. Where I've been (western US, and trail riding), a barn is a building on a farm used to keep hay & cows. A stable is a building in which to keep horses, while "stall" is a space for one horse in the stable. "Riding stable" is the term for a place that gives lessons and so on. I think calling this a "barn" is more of a horse show world usage.

Quote:
Most of the time we use paddock for a small fenced in area, often grassless, and pasture for a larger grass field.
I've never heard the term "paddock" used. Here the equivalent might be "corral". And a large field is pasture only if there's grass to eat.
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Last edited by jamesqf; 11-21-2013 at 12:05 AM.
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post #15 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 12:35 AM
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Location: Seattle, WA
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to me., paddock means an area that is either a dry lot (no grass growing) or is too small to be even near a quarter acre. If it is larger, AND has grass, it is a pasture.

We say, 'I'm going to the barn", when we mean we are going to the riding establishment, or where the horses are kept.
But, we use Stables in the name of any horse facility.
Stable can be used for a "stall", or for the whole block of them.
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post #16 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 04:41 AM Thread Starter
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I love hearing all your thoughts. I suppose it's also true that the US is so vast compared with the UK, there are many variants from one part of the country to another.
Just to throw another question into the mix for anyone who is still reading....
Over here, unsurprisingly, the vast majority of riding is English style. Western is growing in popularity but you can travel for hours before finding an establishment that has Western trained horses and teaches it. Like side-saddle, carriage driving and vaulting, Western is rather a niche activity.

But what about over in the US? I can't fathom whether the majority of riders are Western, or if it's a more even split between Western and English riding.

Probably seems like a daft question, but I did ask this question on a UK horse forum recently and no one had any idea what the answer was!
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post #17 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 11:41 AM
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It is definitely split. Some areas are predominantly English or Western, but there is both to be found. In my state, there is a large population of both English and Western as well as people who trail ride or do endurance in Aussie saddles. I can't speak for other parts of the country since I have only lived in WA, but I believe you'll find the same most places.

Where I live now I see mostly English riders and where I lived before (about an hour away) I saw mostly western, but I could find a western or English barn without traveling far in either place.
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post #18 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Linny Blue View Post
So do you guys use the term 'stable'? Or is it a Barn??

Also, do you horses live out on paddocks or pastures or both?
well my barn and my friends barn both have "stable" at the end of their names (imperial stables, Crescent stables) but we all refer ro it as "the barn.

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post #19 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linny Blue View Post
I love hearing all your thoughts. I suppose it's also true that the US is so vast compared with the UK, there are many variants from one part of the country to another.
Just to throw another question into the mix for anyone who is still reading....
Over here, unsurprisingly, the vast majority of riding is English style. Western is growing in popularity but you can travel for hours before finding an establishment that has Western trained horses and teaches it. Like side-saddle, carriage driving and vaulting, Western is rather a niche activity.

But what about over in the US? I can't fathom whether the majority of riders are Western, or if it's a more even split between Western and English riding.

Probably seems like a daft question, but I did ask this question on a UK horse forum recently and no one had any idea what the answer was!
around here it's mostly English but I went to high school with a girl who rode western nearby, however drive and hour or so into the cloverdale/maple ridge area and it's more of a mix, the camp I volunteer at in maple ridge is western, we did at one point have a English program but kids expected to be jumping at the end of the week.

Equestrianism; 10% luck, 20% skill, 15% concentrated power of will, 5% pleasure, 50% pain and 100% reason to remember you're absolutely insane to be riding a beast that big.
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post #20 of 25 Old 11-21-2013, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Linny Blue View Post
But what about over in the US? I can't fathom whether the majority of riders are Western, or if it's a more even split between Western and English riding.
I couldn't begin to give you numbers, plus there also seems to be a lot of regional variation. Hereabouts (Northern Nevada), it's probably mostly western, but after all, this is the West

Also, around here English seems to be mostly about showing, and tends to attract people with money (or at least those to whom an appearance of money/status is important). Western includes both the "cowboy" world, from rodeo &c to working ranches, plus most people who just like to trail ride. So most of the people I actually see out riding are doing some variant of Western, while the English riders are spending most of their time in indoor arenas.
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