Which should i do ENGLISH or WESTERN ? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 26 Old 03-10-2008, 05:39 PM Thread Starter
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o thanks guys and umm well like I don't know because well its a hard dec ission to make but yeah im just sitting with my friend disscussing what I should do and she knows alot of you because she's on the forum thinger lol.... but thanks for all the help.
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post #12 of 26 Old 03-10-2008, 10:46 PM
tim
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I think JDI is right. There are a lot of lazy western rider's out there. A lot of people do it because it's more manly and easier. :roll:

Now, none of that is true for everyone. It's very difficult to put in words, but I think it boils down to personal standards. Being a proficient rider is not as important in western simply because of how the horses are trained. Still, you can maintain high standards for yourself as long as you have some discipline.

Personally, I think that to be a true equestrian, you should be skilled in both. There's no reason to separate it out like people do, because honestly, they are more similar than most people would admit.

I think you should do both.
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post #13 of 26 Old 03-10-2008, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tim
I think JDI is right. There are a lot of lazy western rider's out there. A lot of people do it because it's more manly and easier. :roll:

Now, none of that is true for everyone. It's very difficult to put in words, but I think it boils down to personal standards. Being a proficient rider is not as important in western simply because of how the horses are trained. Still, you can maintain high standards for yourself as long as you have some discipline.

Personally, I think that to be a true equestrian, you should be skilled in both. There's no reason to separate it out like people do, because honestly, they are more similar than most people would admit.

I think you should do both.
I have to disagree with you. What exactly are you saying is 'easier' in Western riding. I don't see English riders roping or jumpin gonto cows. I think both styles have large ammounts of challenges along with simplicity. Why do you say Western is manlier? I sure think its dirtier but...

We can't throw all the 'lazy' stuff onto Western riding. English has its fair share, too.

I'm not trying to start an argument. I am simply having a discussion. I am curious.

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post #14 of 26 Old 03-10-2008, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluMagic
Quote:
Originally Posted by tim
I think JDI is right. There are a lot of lazy western rider's out there. A lot of people do it because it's more manly and easier. :roll:

Now, none of that is true for everyone. It's very difficult to put in words, but I think it boils down to personal standards. Being a proficient rider is not as important in western simply because of how the horses are trained. Still, you can maintain high standards for yourself as long as you have some discipline.

Personally, I think that to be a true equestrian, you should be skilled in both. There's no reason to separate it out like people do, because honestly, they are more similar than most people would admit.

I think you should do both.
I have to disagree with you. What exactly are you saying is 'easier' in Western riding. I don't see English riders roping or jumpin gonto cows. I think both styles have large ammounts of challenges along with simplicity. Why do you say Western is manlier? I sure think its dirtier but...

We can't throw all the 'lazy' stuff onto Western riding. English has its fair share, too.

I'm not trying to start an argument. I am simply having a discussion. I am curious.
What I meant was riders going from (proficient)English to basic western (walk, jog, lope) is not a huge change, but it seems that riders that are proficient in Western have a harder time switching to English, because the saddle is so different. I'm not saying one is harder than the other, just that basic english-western or western-english ... I've lost what I was saying.
I know for a fact that I wouldn't be able to rope my own foot if I needed to, but I found that switching from English to doing basic western pleasure wasn't a big change - the saddle wasn't hard to adjust to at all. However, I had a few friends that were very good Western riders and they wanted to try my English saddle - so they did, and looked really funny - just because the saddle offers such little support compared to Western saddles.

Okay, I'm done putting my foot in my mouth.


ETA: Personally, I think that to be a true equestrian, you should be skilled in both. There's no reason to separate it out like people do, because honestly, they are more similar than most people would admit. -- so true, Tim. Completely agree.


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post #15 of 26 Old 03-10-2008, 11:33 PM
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I have only been riding seriously for four months, and this is my opinion...I started taking lessons in Western against the advice of my trainer. I progressed quickly mastering whatever new challenge I was given. Then several weeks ago, I decided I would like to see the difference, so I requested my first lesson in English....
The BIGGEST difference I found as a complete newbie was balance. I thought I had super balance until I got in the English saddle on my horse and that was out the window. There was much more contact with the horse and I quickly found I had a lot less saddle to rely on. As a beginner, I could definitely feel the difference.
I would recommend not only taking into consideration what your horse's capabilites are and your personal goals, but trying both out to see what you prefer. There is a difference (at least to a beginner).
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post #16 of 26 Old 03-11-2008, 01:05 AM
tim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluMagic

I have to disagree with you. What exactly are you saying is 'easier' in Western riding. I don't see English riders roping or jumpin gonto cows. I think both styles have large ammounts of challenges along with simplicity. Why do you say Western is manlier? I sure think its dirtier but...

We can't throw all the 'lazy' stuff onto Western riding. English has its fair share, too.

I'm not trying to start an argument. I am simply having a discussion. I am curious.
Sorry if that came off a bit anti-western blu. I wrote it under the context that most people know I ride western.

I'm just commenting on some if the things I see in my fellow competitors. Especially in the western pleasure arena, a lot of riders will just sit on the horse like they are sitting in a recliner. It comes from the fact that the objective of western pleasure is to demonstrate control over your horse with very little visible input from the rider. Those horses that are good at pleasure can require very little from the rider, and since there is no posting / two-point in western riding, there is little need to become very skilled at using your body.

In addition to that, english riding focuses more on the rider, with judges scrutinizing every aspect of your eq no matter which event you are in. With western, horsemanship is really the only event that takes rider position into consideration as heavily as english events do. So, people always tend to associate english riding with perfect posture and ultra-correct body position at all times, whereas western is viewed as being more relaxed about it.

Also, the design of the western saddle makes it easier to become lazy, with such long stirrups and such an extensive surface to sit on.

The manliness comes form the days of the cowboys, and it leaves a perceived rustic aspect to riding western that you don't get with english.

Hope that helps you understand where I'm coming from. By no means am I trying to insult western , I just think it's not as much about the rider as english is, but more about the horse sometimes. You do have a very good point about the working events like cutting and reining.
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post #17 of 26 Old 03-11-2008, 01:31 AM
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:-D I feel better lol

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post #18 of 26 Old 03-11-2008, 04:21 AM
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I have ridden English all my life. When I go on big treks I find it far more comfortable to ride in a western/stock saddle.
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post #19 of 26 Old 03-11-2008, 09:16 AM
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I ride both. I agree with tim completely. You have much more contact with the horse in English then Western. You can't do as much in a western saddle. It just doesn't work out that way.
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post #20 of 26 Old 03-11-2008, 02:58 PM
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I think every western rider starts out English. When in an English saddle posture is VERY important or you'll go flying out of your saddle. Ride English first, get your balance and seat and then go Western and see which you prefer.

I prefer bareback, I don't like either to be honest. Saddles are hard, restricting and sweaty. :) I prefer my bum and the horses back. 8)

Edit--

I have to say I completely disagree with twodozen. I find western saddles MUCH more comfy for long rides.
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