Should I be riding her?
 
 

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Should I be riding her?

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  • What are the signs to look for if my horse is bonded to me?

 
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    01-19-2011, 09:36 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Should I be riding her?

I just got my first horse, a 14yo TB mare, Elly. I am completely new to horses.

I am working with the Parelli Program with her. We are doing a lot of familiarisation stuff so she gets used to me, and I her!

She is quite easy to catch, will take the saddle and everything fine. Fusses a bit over the bit but you can get it on. She is quite comfortable being led around with all the gear on, or with someone on her.

My niece and kids have ridden her, while being led. She won't walk along unless on the lead, my 16yo niece has tried riding her without the lead. She refuses to budge! It is quite funny to watch.

I haven't been on her yet, I want to establish that bond with her, so she wants me to ride her. Or will I be waiting forever? Should I be riding her?

Thanks!
     
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    01-19-2011, 10:37 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I really don't understand why not. Heck, the best way to get into a horses brain (in my opinion) is from the saddle! Its not like she's old or anything. Sorry, but I don't understand the "want me to ride her" part. I don't really think any horse wants to be ridden lol
     
    01-19-2011, 10:49 PM
  #3
Started
You have no previous experience, never ridden? Then stick to the program step-by-step & understand that it's not about riding, it's about the relationship.

Level 1 - Safety! You must have the lateral flexion on her from the ground, e.g., so that you have your emergency stop astride. (Seems like it can be skipped because she hasn't thus far stepped out? Wrong!) How are you doing with that?

Good luck in learning Safety so that you can graduate to Level 2! :)
     
    01-19-2011, 10:52 PM
  #4
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenTreeFrog    

She won't walk along unless on the lead, my 16yo niece has tried riding her without the lead. She refuses to budge! It is quite funny to watch.

I haven't been on her yet, I want to establish that bond with her, so she wants me to ride her. Or will I be waiting forever? Should I be riding her?

Thanks!
Congrats on your new horse. These comments concern me a bit. A horse that refuses to budge is only funny until you try to ask for more and get bucked into next week. This horse is already disrespecting you and needs proper training to make her a safe ride. You say you want to wait until she wants you to ride her? Horse's do not look for friends like humans do. Horses respect leadership. That's your bond. Please bring an experienced horse person in to help you with this horse before you're posting topics about this horse charging you when you try to enter her stall or worse. TB's are very smart and will learn very quickly, good or bad.
     
    01-19-2011, 11:17 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
People are not trying to scare you about your horse, but they do make a good point. A horse that cannot be made to go forward under saddle can be demonstrating any number of reasons for that;
It could be that it doesn't really understand what the rider is saying, as bizarre as that may sound. On the race track, the horses' go forward from a bell ringing, not the jockey kicking them. She may have almost no training as a typical riding horse.
Maybe she has already figured out that you don't know what you are doing and decided that she never need do any work. That would changed that instant a rider who knew her stuff got on board, and in that case things would straighten out quickly and fairly simply.
Or, she is frustrated about something and is just shut down. So, she freezes. In that case, when the logjam is broken, she may do what some feared and go into bucking.

I think if you cannot move the horse around on the ground via body language and a leadline, then you wouldn't want to get on their back. Might not take much to get to that place, so don't despair.
Work on getting her to move forward and backward, move shoulders over and hind end over. And if you have a round pen, getting her to move good and forward off pure body language.

I think you'll do ok with ground work for a bit. However she see you on the groudn (a pushover, a leader, a dunce, a tyrant ) that is how you will relate to her from the saddle. So if she isn't seeing a good reason to go forward under saddle, then something big is missing on the ground.
     
    01-19-2011, 11:25 PM
  #6
Trained
Sorry Green Trea Frog, I didn't mean to scare you. I realize my above post reads a bit harsh. I just get concerned when I hear new horse owners talk about bonding with an 1100 pound animal, like it's just an oversize pet. I just do not want to see you get hurt.

You say this horse is 14. I assume in all that time, she has been trained under saddle since most horses stop racing by age 5 or 6. Do you know what her former training has been? A good snapshot on what she already knows will give quick insights into whether her behavior is due to confusion or just being stubborn. The solution to both is firm, consistent communication.
     
    01-20-2011, 12:01 AM
  #7
Foal
I have to disagree about bonding with your horse. If there's no bond there, there's no trust. If you have no trust, your horse will act up on you and you will likely get hurt.
     
    01-20-2011, 06:02 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MangoRoX87    
Sorry, but I don't understand the "want me to ride her" part. I don't really think any horse wants to be ridden lol
I have read somewhere in the Parelli stuff that if you have a strong bond with your horse, it can show signs of actually wanting you to ride it. So that is where that statement came from!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
You have no previous experience, never ridden? Then stick to the program step-by-step & understand that it's not about riding, it's about the relationship.

Level 1 - Safety! You must have the lateral flexion on her from the ground, e.g., so that you have your emergency stop astride. (Seems like it can be skipped because she hasn't thus far stepped out? Wrong!) How are you doing with that?

Good luck in learning Safety so that you can graduate to Level 2! :)
That is my goal, to build the relationship. I have ridden over the years but only socially at riding ranchs. I don't really know what I am doing. But I am an avid and fast learner. I really like the idea of Level 1 being safety and giving me the skills to know what to do to be safe for both of us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Please bring an experienced horse person in to help you with this horse before you're posting topics about this horse charging you when you try to enter her stall or worse.
I have contacted a Parelli instructor about a course and private tuition. I am going to get some over to help me, hopefully this weekend or next week.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
People are not trying to scare you about your horse, but they do make a good point.
That is OK, they won't scare me. I want realistic advice. I know some of it will be conflicting, I appreciate all feedback and will learn from it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I think if you cannot move the horse around on the ground via body language and a leadline, then you wouldn't want to get on their back. Might not take much to get to that place, so don't despair.
I can walk her on a lead line well, she stops and turns fine. She walks fine with a saddle on as well. I am doing the Friendly game with her and can touch her all over. I am can push her head down by applying pressure and releasing when she moves. So we are getting thier. No despair yet! It is just great to get advice and pointers. This is why I am questioning whether I ride her yet. No point getting on her if she isn't going to go anywhere. I figured if I work with her on the ground, then we bond and learn stuff and she will respond to me better, when I do get on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
So if she isn't seeing a good reason to go forward under saddle, then something big is missing on the ground.
Great advice, I will always remember that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Sorry Green Trea Frog, I didn't mean to scare you. I realize my above post reads a bit harsh.
Not at all. I am not overly sensitive, I have been around many forums for many years! I appreciate the feedback and look for the message in the words, not the tone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
You say this horse is 14. I assume in all that time, she has been trained under saddle since most horses stop racing by age 5 or 6. Do you know what her former training has been? A good snapshot on what she already knows will give quick insights into whether her behavior is due to confusion or just being stubborn. The solution to both is firm, consistent communication.
My Aunty got her at 5 and had her for 6 years. She was much more high spirited then. She did Parelli stuff with her, not sure how far, and she used to ride her a fair bit.

At 11yo Elly went to my cousins 225 acres where she got a lot less attention but still some riding from my cousin and her step-daughters. She did say her husband (who has exp with horses) used to ride her first to calm her down.

3 years later, at 14yo, she comes to me. So I am starting from the ground myself! And want to do it right with her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kywalkinghorse2010    
I have to disagree about bonding with your horse. If there's no bond there, there's no trust. If you have no trust, your horse will act up on you and you will likely get hurt.
This is my way of thinking too. Given I am not an experienced horsewoman, yet, I think the bond I develop with her will help both of us. I understand though she is an instinct, herd animal. I need to learn how to manage and work with her.

Thanks everyone.
     
    01-20-2011, 06:19 AM
  #9
Foal
In my experience, if you don't bond with the horse, it's not going to be a good working relationship between the two of you. Building a bond shows that the horse has trust in you and what you do, therefore, building a more confident animal. Because, if the horse is confident with you, then it's less likely to spook at petty things IMO. My horse and I have a really strong bond and she wants to be ridden/interacted with.
     
    01-20-2011, 08:44 AM
  #10
Trained
A horse you don't know will be confidant in you if you are a strong leader. That being said, it is a great thing to build a good bond with your own horse.
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