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So a shamed

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        09-23-2012, 08:28 AM
      #21
    Weanling
    I put my cousin on my bomb-proof 15yo gelding after she had only been riding for 6 months. She hadn't learned to canter yet because she was too scared , so we were working on posting. She let the reins get long and the trot got too fast and he started to canter. Then she started screaming which made him go faster. I was telling her to sit up and pull back, but she didn't do it. Then she fell off and didn't want to get back on. We thought she was just going to be done riding, but guess what. She went to her instructor the next week and said, "I want to learn to canter because I want to be ready for what could happen".

    The point is- no horse is perfect, and you might have motivated this student to learn more or try harder so something like this doesn't happen again. I'm sure she and her mom understand that there are risks with riding- just make sure she is ok and don't push her too hard the next lesson.
         
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        09-23-2012, 12:14 PM
      #22
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NBEventer    
    I always tell my kids that when they fall off it means they are a real rider now. They get a laugh out of it.
    I can see how this is helpful, but I just remember when I was in middle school I met a girl who told me that I wasn't a real rider because I hadn't had the good fortune of falling off yet.

    I just remember thinking "Huh, I've been riding 5 more years than you... managed to stay on the horses when they bolted and bucked... but I'm not an actual rider?"

    I've been in the game long enough now though that yes, I'm a real rider by all accounts and calculations. I've fallen off thanks to my own ambition while galloping bareback, fallen off due to bucks, spooks, and other shenanigans... and had a treeless saddle slide out from under me.
         
        09-23-2012, 12:45 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Trailhorserider-

    Not all equestrians are trail riders, and the trails aren't that important to them. In fact, many high prized competition horses never see the trail. They have specific rings to do specific jobs. The roundpen, lesson arena, warm-up arena, the jump arena, the dressage arena, the show arena, ect. There are even arenas for trail horses.

    Although I am all for trail riding and I understand your point of view, many, many horses have not and do not go out on trails because its just not their job. Many competitors won't take their horses out because it can be an unecessary danger to that horse and god forbid it may leave some tail hair on a limb out there somewhere.

    Not all horses will be "outside" horses. Those who act well in the ring will come unglued without the arena. Vice versa as well. Its to the horse's preference and job. Its just not practical to say "All horses should be out on trails!" Horses don't have to prove themselves in outside conditions anymore, because we don't rely on horses to take us to our destinations these days.

    On another page, same book, the arena is a safety and a training tool. We teach young riders and schooling riders within the confines of this area to better their control, timing and aids. The enclosed area gives us a specific type of safety that an open field would not. We also use the arena as a training tool for our horses as well before we take them out on the arena. Its basically a large, flat area with fencing as a "fail safe" in case something would happen.

    Never having been out on a trail can be a deal breaker to some, but it doesn't necessarily lower the value of the horse. To a serious dressage competitor, walking across a mud puddle isn't going to be as important as a well performed piaffe. Would it be ideal for that horse to behave on the trails as well as extend a trot to place first? Yes. But for those who want that ribbon, the trails don't matter too much. And for riders who want those trails, the extended trot doesn't matter. You value the horse at what its good at, and people will buy that horse based on the training in it's chosen discipline.
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
        09-23-2012, 12:56 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Eolith    
    I can see how this is helpful, but I just remember when I was in middle school I met a girl who told me that I wasn't a real rider because I hadn't had the good fortune of falling off yet.

    I just remember thinking "Huh, I've been riding 5 more years than you... managed to stay on the horses when they bolted and bucked... but I'm not an actual rider?"

    I've been in the game long enough now though that yes, I'm a real rider by all accounts and calculations. I've fallen off thanks to my own ambition while galloping bareback, fallen off due to bucks, spooks, and other shenanigans... and had a treeless saddle slide out from under me.
    Falling off = good rider is an old saying to make people feel better about being dumped.

    It makes the faller feel better, and it brings down the people who haven't fallen yet to a certain level. It attempts to even out the playing field.

    Falling off is a learning experience. You learn everytime you fall off. My instructor used to tell me (which I then passed on to students)that when I fell off, to get up, dust myself off, catch the horse and thank him for the wonderful learning experience.

    I don't use the "real riders fall off" thing anymore. If a kid tells me they have been riding for 4 years and have never fallen, I simply reply "It'll come" and leave it at that. Because it will come.
         
        09-23-2012, 02:40 PM
      #25
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Copperhead    
    Falling off = good rider is an old saying to make people feel better about being dumped.

    It makes the faller feel better, and it brings down the people who haven't fallen yet to a certain level. It attempts to even out the playing field.

    Falling off is a learning experience. You learn everytime you fall off. My instructor used to tell me (which I then passed on to students)that when I fell off, to get up, dust myself off, catch the horse and thank him for the wonderful learning experience.

    I don't use the "real riders fall off" thing anymore. If a kid tells me they have been riding for 4 years and have never fallen, I simply reply "It'll come" and leave it at that. Because it will come.
    This. I have actually been thinking of rewording the way I say it to kids because I realized it can work in the opposite effect.

    I do like the way of putting it where falling off = a learning experience.
         
        09-26-2012, 07:23 AM
      #26
    Weanling
    I was always told it takes 7 falls to make a good rider. I remember asking my instructor why that was the case, when it seemed like you would be a better rider if you stayed on. And she told me that you have to fall off to learn how to stay on.

    I do remember my seventh fall though - it was several years after I'd started learning to ride, and I'd learned a hell of a lot more about riding by then, and it was a bit of an epiphany moment. I remembered what my instructor had said, and realised that it was nothing to do with the number, it was to do with knowing that there will be a lot of falls and that we can't improve until we accept that not only is falling off part of riding, but it's sometimes better to fall than to stay on...
         
        09-26-2012, 09:00 AM
      #27
    Green Broke
    I dislike the whole concepts of falling = real/good rider or that a number of falls is some sort of threshold. It's very belittling to those of us who don't fall very often. You're not automatically a better rider than anyone else because you've fallen. Yes you certainly learn something from a fall and you may in fact have improved from it but it doesn't give you a higher rank than someone else.

    I haven't fallen very often. This is because I'm conservative when riding and I'm also impressively sticky. I don't know what it is about the way I ride but there's been more than one occasion where I've bad people stop what they were doing to watch me recover my seat from an almost fall. Falling is easy, staying on is hard. Both make you better than you were but not necessarily better than someone else.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        09-26-2012, 10:06 AM
      #28
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DancingArabian    
    I dislike the whole concepts of falling = real/good rider or that a number of falls is some sort of threshold. It's very belittling to those of us who don't fall very often. You're not automatically a better rider than anyone else because you've fallen. Yes you certainly learn something from a fall and you may in fact have improved from it but it doesn't give you a higher rank than someone else.

    I haven't fallen very often. This is because I'm conservative when riding and I'm also impressively sticky. I don't know what it is about the way I ride but there's been more than one occasion where I've bad people stop what they were doing to watch me recover my seat from an almost fall. Falling is easy, staying on is hard. Both make you better than you were but not necessarily better than someone else.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Haha yes I tell people that I'm too scared to fall off! I'm conservative too, but when all hell breaks loose I seem to have a good seat and stick with it (touching wood!)
         
        09-26-2012, 10:09 AM
      #29
    Foal
    Don't feel bad. It could happen to anyone and any horse. A little girl was taking a lesson before me and was using the barn's most reliable lesson horse. A 25 yr old been there, done that, seen everything type of horse. Weellll, that day they went on trail and they didn't even make it to the end of the field, the horse decided she wanted to go back to the barn instead and turned around and full galloped back to the barn. Little girl stayed on (we now call her amazing velcro butt), but was a little scared. She still takes lessons, is a little shaken up, but her and her family knew of the risks involved with riding. Comes with the territory.
         

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