Spurs or no Spurs?
   

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Spurs or no Spurs?

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  • Ponyboy spurs
  • How do spurs work?

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    03-27-2012, 01:50 PM
  #1
Banned
Spurs or no Spurs?

What, when and how would you use them on a horse? Is it cruel not cruel? Who uses them? And why? Lol sorry just a couple questions that I have had stuck in my head and always forgot to ask :P thanks so much for the answers
     
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    03-27-2012, 02:20 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Just like any riding aid it's only as cruel as the person using it makes it. Within 4 days of breaking out a colt I usually put spurs (little ones) on. A spur is an extension of my leg it's a cue refiner or corrector. I use spurs so quickly because I want that horse to understand what they are an how to work off them. Especially with a dull horse. Alot of people use spurs, it's a personal preference.
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    03-27-2012, 02:36 PM
  #3
Weanling
I wont climb on a horse without them. They are a useful tool used to comunicate with your horse they can use it to move your horse to the side fast or head to dodge. You can use be on a horse all day and never touch the horse with them, but they are there if you need them.
I beleive they are a tool like you saddle, rope and bit.
     
    03-27-2012, 06:45 PM
  #4
Yearling
If I can't make the horse work without spurs then it isn't the right horse for me, simple as that. Since I don't compete in a discipline where spurs are required there's no need to use them - I would rather get a more suitable horse.
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    03-27-2012, 06:56 PM
  #5
Foal
From what I understand, they are used to increase the pressure of your leg aids I personally have never used them if you have a really really dull horse then I might consider using them otherwise I would use the cruising exercise from the downunder methods where you can easily increase your horses responsiveness to your leg aids without spurs, I know some horses that are fine with spurs, others are super hypersensitive to them because of improper use, some wont even react until you dig them in 3 in deep (believe it or not its a 4 year old!) but it all depends on the horse and the rider, if you have a very stable and soft lower leg then it would be ok, but if your unstable in your lower leg or tend to jab with your leg aids then probably not, but it all depends on the horse and rider, its definitely not a one size fits all deal
     
    03-27-2012, 07:11 PM
  #6
Trained
Spurs should never be used by someone who does not know how to use them. I always - always - make sure the horse I am riding is used to them, but I also always ask with my calves before I ever even touch them with my spurs. Spurs are used for refinement, not for "speed" for "Instant results" as most people believe.

Think about it. What is going to be a more distinct cue for the horse? The small pinpoint of the spur or the thicker, dull side of your boot? The cues in which we move the horse's body parts really aren't that far away from each other, so the smaller we can make that area for each individual cue the easier it is for the horse to understand. Does it mean we are always going to jab them to death with our spurs? No. Does it mean that if the horse doesn't understand with our calves we are going to touch them with our spurs to reinforce and guide them into the right thing? Yes.
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    03-28-2012, 09:28 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by whispering willow    
What, when and how would you use them on a horse? Is it cruel not cruel? Who uses them? And why? Lol sorry just a couple questions that I have had stuck in my head and always forgot to ask :P thanks so much for the answers
Spurs are used for the purpose of refining your leg cues, by having lighter cues for the horse to respond to.

Like any other piece of equipment, spurs can be cruel if used in the wrong way by inexperienced or ignorant riders. They very easily can stab and gouge a horse's skin and sides. How would you feel if someone kicks their legs on you as hard as they could with an inch of metal? So yes they can be cruel in the wrong hands, like anything else, but if used properly, they allow for quieter, more advanced cueing.

There isn't a particular situation that requires spurs but you will commonly find them in the show or performance ring (reining, western pleasure, cutting, roping, etc).

Overall, spurs are a personal preferance for the rider.

I myself do not wear spurs. However, I've hoping to do some better reining training on my horses, and also learn to rope, so I may be strapping up once in a while in the future if it would help me and my horse.

Quote:
Especially with a dull horse.
I would disagree with you here .delete. I think it needs to be addressed as to why the horse is dull or non-responsive, which usually is just a training issue.

And I say that because I 100% agree with:

Quote:
If I can't make the horse work without spurs then it isn't the right horse for me, simple as that. Since I don't compete in a discipline where spurs are required there's no need to use them - I would rather
If you cannot get a good response from your horse with your bare heel leg cues, then you are not ready for refinement (which is what the purpose of spurs are for). IMO

Quote:
from what I understand, they are used to increase the pressure of your leg aids I personally have never used them if you have a really really dull horse then I might consider using them
They are not used to increase the pressure of your legs. You can't increase pressure on a pin-prick size of a spur, or you'd stab it into your horse's side. As far as the dull horse, as I said above, the problem as to why he is dull should be addressed with training.

SorrelHorse --> You hit the nail on the head.
     
    03-28-2012, 10:02 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159    
I would disagree with you here .delete. I think it needs to be addressed as to why the horse is dull or non-responsive, which usually is just a training issue.
^ On that note, my reining mare is just the laziest possible horse on the face of the planet. She WILL get off the dull boot, however, there is definitely a bit of lag.

I believe if you have a dull horse, the spur is also a great tool. You ask with your calves, and if the horse still doesn't respond, rather than wearing yourself out thumping the skin off them, you can just pick up and touch with your spurs. That, in the end, will teach the horse to move lighter with your legs than waiting until they are totally responsive to your calves.

Now I'm not saying you immediately jump to the spurs, you always always always ask with your calves first, but unless your horse is lame/sore/sick/hurting, the spurs are an excellent tool for perking up a dull horse.
     
    03-28-2012, 10:21 PM
  #9
Green Broke
That comment made me laugh. The first time I sat on the horse I last broke out it took me forever to get him to move forward. He is a /naturally/ dull horse. To keep him going forward I had to continue smacking him with the reins to keep him walking. He is dull in his mouth an on his sides. He's a quiet lifeless animal. I have to literally drag him everywhere even back to the barn. He has been like this from day 1.

So beau, I respectfully completely disagree with you.
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    03-29-2012, 08:45 AM
  #10
Foal
I've always wondered this too... :)
     

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