Stallions... what's the big deal? - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Stallions... what's the big deal?

This is a discussion on Stallions... what's the big deal? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        08-08-2008, 11:47 AM
      #21
    Showing
    I also agree with JDI!

    & Vet, I know where you're coming from. But there are some stallions who do act up. I'd still rather have a gelding than a stallion.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        08-08-2008, 11:55 AM
      #22
    Foal
    Quote:
    NO, they are NOT mean, viscious animals that are blood-thirsty killers, but they DO have instincts and hormones that DO make them different than a mare or gelding.
    Agreed. Like you said, with training, they can be a good mount, like any other horse.

    Here's my opinion:
    A stallion is always going to be good at one thing - breeding. Which is why I also agree that stallions should be left to pros. Someone who is going to turn that horse into a good mount, and take him to high levels. Someone who is planning on breeding him. Usually people like that pick a horse that has good lines, excellent conformation, etc. A horse that is MEANT for breeding and will procude nice foals... IMO, some stallions are not meant for breeding and are better off being geldings.

    If you're not breeding, geld him. They can both do the same things, except one can't produce foals. Lol.
         
        08-08-2008, 07:37 PM
      #23
    Banned
    Someone here said they are unpredictible but in actual fact they are highly predictible.

    When handling/riding a stallion you must always keep in mind that even in the best of times 20% of their brain is on the pretty filly he saw or will see.

    A good horseman by definition will control the 80% and manage the 20%. Do that and life gets very easy to deal with.
         
        08-08-2008, 11:00 PM
      #24
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FutureVetGirl
    Sure... I agree that there's no reason to have a stallion if you're not planning on using him (I see the same way with ALL horses, but that's not for me to say).

    But just because a stallion CAN be dangerous, doesn't mean that he WILL be dangerous.
    He is more likely to be dangerous than a gelding, pure and simple. Why? HORMONES. They have an INSTINCT to be the top dog around an area, and so they act accordingly.

    Just like: Just becaues I CAN be dangerous, doesn't mean I WILL be dangerous.
    NOT the same, sorry. You can think about consequences and know that we live in a society that doesn't allow violence. The horse does NOT think like that. If you're in the way and he wants to get to a mare, he does NOT care if he has to hurt you to get to the mare.

    **note: I am NOT saying that all stallions are dangerous. But ALL of them CAN be, given the right circumstance.


    Everything has the potential of being dangerous. Including teddy bears, pillows, scarves, paper, anything. But that doesn't mean that they WILL be dangerous.
    NOT the same thing - everything you listed there was an inanimate object - if you're hurt by a scarf, then something else was in play.
    Giving the benefit of the doubt, let's move on to, say, dogs. I have a Rottweiler. CAN she be dangerous? Heck yes! Is she well-trained? Yes, yes, and yes again. HOWEVER - since she is a Rottie, I DO pay extra attention to her and DO treat her differently than I would a Retriever. Why? Because of her breed history. She is a wonderful dog, but she CAN get aggressive.
    Because of her breed, if she attacks something, even just pins another dog and doesn't actually hurt it, she can get destroyed just because of her breed, and the fact that she acted aggressivly. I'm pretty sure that if I had a Papillion and it attacked something, people would let it slide.
    Owning a stallion is the same thing. If they show aggressive tendencies, people are going to be more likely to pin blame on him than a gelding, because of the stigma that stallions have - it's earned somehow!



    Just because a stallion has hormones doesn't mean that he'll always act upon them. Not ALWAYS, but a lot of the time they will.Not every unnuetered dog that passes a female in heat will go nuts. Again, sometimes they will.Just like not every ungelded stallion that passes a mare in heat will go nuts. And just like not every man that passes a hot girl will go nuts.
    Again, you CANNOT compare humans to horses, we just don't think alike.
    I agree, with proper handling, a stallion is *most times* as well-behaved as a gelding. HOWEVER - you can NEVER EVER EVER let your guard down. They DO react to certain situations. They have hormones that they instinctually follow, and a little pep talk isn't going to help.

    Like I said, I really only like to see stallions in the hands of professionals.


    You may say that I'm comparing completely different things. I'm not. I'm not saying that a beginner should go out and grab a stallion. I'm not saying that at all. But by saying that people should steer clear of each and every stallion, that's just stupid. How would you like it if someone said to you "steer clear of every boy", just because they have the potential of doing something to you?
    People NEED to be aware that stallions are NOT like mares or geldings. They just aren't. They're not wired the same way.
    Once again, I only really like seeing stallions in the hands of professionals because that way they have a chance of making something of themselves, something to earn their manhood by. Otherwise, geld 'im.
    Stallions are NOT for everyone, and one SHOULD think long and hard before buying one - they are a liability! They're more likely to try and break out of a paddock to breed a mare than a gelding. They are more likely to act a little sex-crazed than a gelding. They can impregnate mares, and when it's unwanted, it's not a good thing! They CAN be dangerous to handle.
    If you don't have stallion experience, don't get one.


    Most stallions really aren't the nutty kind. It's a fact. Most stallions are the calmer kind. It's the rare few that truly go nuts over mares in heat, and they're the ones that need the extra training. Other than that, stallions really aren't that different from mares or geldings.
    I'm sorry, but the line "stallions really aren't that different from mares or geldings" really gets me - yes they are, a hundred times over. Saying that they aren't is, in my mind, fairly ignorant. They're wired differently than mares or geldings. Mares don't have to protect their herd from other stallions... stallions have to do the dirty work of warding off other stallions when it's his band of mares. Geldings just do not have that reproductive instinct that they need to protect a herd to breed them.
    Most stallions are manageable through daiy correct handling, where they KNOW they can't get away with any misbehaviours... get a stallion in the wrong hands, and let me know how it goes.




    Ever seen a person on steriods? They're aggressive. That's because of the extra testosterone. (*ahem* like stallions.) And before you ask, yes I know first hand... my most recent ex started taking 'roids and became abusive. He was the sweetest guy in the world till then.
         
        08-09-2008, 05:01 AM
      #25
    Weanling
    Look. I get what you're saying, but I completely disagree. A stallion is still a horse. I'm not saying that you should throw a stallion into anyone's hands. But they're not just for the "pros" as you put it.

    Not every stallion has a zillion hormones buzzing around. Some do, I'll give you that, but not all.

    The stallions that I've ridden were NOT trained by professionals, they were NOT trained to be amazing competitors, and they were NOT bred from extremely calm lines. In fact, quite the opposite. And still... I found no difference in them from a mare or a gelding.

    A horse is a horse. A dog is a dog.

    By saying that a rottweiler or a pit bull needs to be watched after more and is more unpredictable than say a chihuahua or a papillion or a retriever, it's just plain bigotry, and just plain stupid. Just because an animal has a history of doing something doesn't mean it'll fall into the same pattern.

    Now, you say that I can't talk this way, but if people believe that we come from Evolution, and we're animals, I have every right:

    If you came from a background that was full of cruel slave drivers, and you have the abusive "gene" in you, yet, you were raised by kind, loving parents, would you still be abusive and cruel? No. And you'd call it bigotry if someone held the crimes of your forefathers against you.

    I've had pit bulls. And let me tell you something FLAT OUT. Pit bulls always were, and always will be the kindest and most gentle dog in the world. The problem is always the handler. Most people say that Retrievers are the most loyal and gentle dogs ever, I scough. Even in a good home, they tend to be a bit rowdy, and in bad homes, they can sometimes be worse than pits or rotties.

    And I've worked with stallions. Don't call me ignorant, don't call me stupid, and don't say I don't know what I'm talking about. No. I don't believe that any little girl should have a testosterone high stallion in their backyard. So PLEASE stop acting like that's what I'm saying. What I'm saying is that many people make the ASSUMPTION (yes... I say ASSUMPTION) that stallions are walking ten miles high on testosterone and hormones. And that's false. Hormones only truly act up when a mare is in heat. And most stallions (unless they're untrained and unsocialized) will do little more than prick up their ears and maybe get a bit sidetracked from what they are doing.

    I've seen stallions in bad hands. It can be nasty. But every single one of those stallions (without being gelded) with just a little TLC, and some training, has become a wonderful, kind, and gentle horse for (yes) anyone.
         
        08-09-2008, 11:51 AM
      #26
    Foal
    Quote:
    Look. I get what you're saying, but I completely disagree. A stallion is still a horse. I'm not saying that you should throw a stallion into anyone's hands. But they're not just for the "pros" as you put it.

    Not every stallion has a zillion hormones buzzing around. Some do, I'll give you that, but not all.

    The stallions that I've ridden were NOT trained by professionals, they were NOT trained to be amazing competitors, and they were NOT bred from extremely calm lines. In fact, quite the opposite. And still... I found no difference in them from a mare or a gelding.

    A horse is a horse. A dog is a dog.

    By saying that a rottweiler or a pit bull needs to be watched after more and is more unpredictable than say a chihuahua or a papillion or a retriever, it's just plain bigotry, and just plain stupid. Just because an animal has a history of doing something doesn't mean it'll fall into the same pattern.

    Now, you say that I can't talk this way, but if people believe that we come from Evolution, and we're animals, I have every right:

    If you came from a background that was full of cruel slave drivers, and you have the abusive "gene" in you, yet, you were raised by kind, loving parents, would you still be abusive and cruel? No. And you'd call it bigotry if someone held the crimes of your forefathers against you.

    I've had pit bulls. And let me tell you something FLAT OUT. Pit bulls always were, and always will be the kindest and most gentle dog in the world. The problem is always the handler. Most people say that Retrievers are the most loyal and gentle dogs ever, I scough. Even in a good home, they tend to be a bit rowdy, and in bad homes, they can sometimes be worse than pits or rotties.

    And I've worked with stallions. Don't call me ignorant, don't call me stupid, and don't say I don't know what I'm talking about. No. I don't believe that any little girl should have a testosterone high stallion in their backyard. So PLEASE stop acting like that's what I'm saying. What I'm saying is that many people make the ASSUMPTION (yes... I say ASSUMPTION) that stallions are walking ten miles high on testosterone and hormones. And that's false. Hormones only truly act up when a mare is in heat. And most stallions (unless they're untrained and unsocialized) will do little more than prick up their ears and maybe get a bit sidetracked from what they are doing.

    I've seen stallions in bad hands. It can be nasty. But every single one of those stallions (without being gelded) with just a little TLC, and some training, has become a wonderful, kind, and gentle horse for (yes) anyone.
    I get what you're saying. With the correct handleing and training a stallion can be a good mount. I agree. Same with Pittbulls. I think they're lovely dogs, not blood thirsty killers. It's all in how you raise them. If they're taught to be a gentle, well behaved dog, then they probably will be. If they're taught to be mean, they probably will be.

    I don't think anyone here thinks you're stupid or anything. You have a good point.

    Here's what I think alot of people are wondering though: Yes, a stallion can be trained right and be a VERY nice horse. But if you're not breeding, why keep him a stallion?
         
        08-09-2008, 11:59 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    The answer to your question is: Why not?

    Not everyone who has a stallion intends on breeding him just like not everyone who has a mare intends on breeding her.

    Some people do it because they believe that castration will cause health problems. Some people are just plain against it. Some people just prefer the slight risk and joy of keeping it a stallion. And some just would prefer the fact that if they ever wanted to continue their horse's lines, they could. Not necessarily that they will.
         
        08-09-2008, 12:31 PM
      #28
    Banned
    Not arguing one way or the other but riding a stallion is like riding no other.

    The feel is so totally different. To some it is just for that feeling and no I don't mean a power trip but for the sensitivity and response that only a stallion can give. And when they give, they give 110%
         
        08-09-2008, 02:31 PM
      #29
    Foal
    I guess everyone has their opinion. I'm not bashing anyones at all. Mine is just that a stallion should be a stallion for one thing - Breeding. But I don't think all stallions are complete lunatics.

    I have a Half Arab gelding that gives me 110% in everything he does. He was gelded as a 3 year old [or maybe 4, I can't remember which. He was gelded before we bought him]. We would've had no use for him being a stallion. He's got decent conformation, and some nice lines, but we had no intentions of breeding him. He's just simply a trail horse.

    And if we ever have to sell him, I think he might have a better chance of finding a home than if he were a stallion. That's just what I think though. From my point of view, if I was looking to buy a horse, just to trail ride or take to some small shows, I wouldn't want a Half Arab stallion. And if I was a breeder, I wouldn't want him if he were a stallion either. Yes, he's an awesome horse to work with, but he doesn't have amazing lines or great conformation.
         
        08-09-2008, 04:16 PM
      #30
    Trained
    Put bulls, stallions, and rotties all have a reputation that preceeds them. For a reason. Stallions have the potential to be dangerous mounts period. I know that there are exceptions to all the rules. For the everyday happy hacker a stallion can be a liability, stallions are best left to knowledgable breeders.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:55 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0