Stallions... what's the big deal? - Page 6
 
 

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Stallions... what's the big deal?

This is a discussion on Stallions... what's the big deal? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        08-11-2008, 12:25 PM
      #51
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
    I firmly believe that stallions should be left to pros. People that can campaign them and take them to the big stuff - that's what you want procreating, not a backyard pet.. unless for some reason he's amazingly well conformed and has a bloodline to match.. but there are SO many nice stallions to choose from, why should there be anything but the best out there?

    I am willing to bet that 80% of the stallion owners out there are in it for one thing - their ego. They love to say "well today my stallion" and "well my stallion this, and my stallion that." Yeeea, it's sexy... not. A lot of people try and convince themselves that it's because of a different reason, but more likely than not, it's ego. (Whether they will freely admit that or not is up for debate.)

    Stallions DO require more training than your average mare or gelding, it's their nature to do one thing well, and that is BREED - in that, they have to fight for their mares, and make themselves the biggest baddest horse out there to ward other males off. In that testosterone-driven mind, somehow a puny little human is supposed to convince them that breeding is NOT on the menu today, thanks, please follow me calmly so we can go ride.

    Stallions require more care. They CAN BE DANGEROUS. Some will stop at nothing to try and get some of that shmexy tail across the way, and Heaven help anyone trying to get in the way. Their very nature is to breed, and they are hormonally driven to do so. They can injure themselves, the mare, or other horses in the process, which is why it will be hard to find a barn that will board a stallion, especially if there's one on the property already. Or children.

    NO, they are NOT mean, viscious animals that are blood-thirsty killers, but they DO have instincts and hormones that DO make them different than a mare or gelding.


    Ok, rant over.
    I completely agree!!!
         
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        08-11-2008, 12:45 PM
      #52
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FutureVetGirl
    Well... they aren't as aggressive as you guys are making them out to be. They graze. They don't run around and play. They're not stupid horses.
    no one said they were stupid, we didn't say ALL STALLIONS ARE AGGRESSIVE. We said MOST of them are and it is true. I've heard of a few stallions here and there that are as calm as can be. Who was it here that has the stallions. I think FehrGroundRanch has a beautiful stallion who if I remember correctly is calm. She posted picks of her son on him before. And who else was it. I think it was AK PaintLover who had another gorgeous stally who is very calm. Were not all saying there aggressive, just most of them can be and you have to be on your toes when it comes to them.

    Quote:
    Just because a horse is a stallion, doesn't mean that he's going to kill. I'll admit that sometimes they DO need more care and attention than other horses, but for the most part, these horses are fine.
    it doesnt MEAN he's going to kill but then alot of stallys will go and do anything and everything to get to that mare in heat in the other pasture.

    Quote:
    And I understand that you're "trying" to "educate" me about something I know more about than you do.
    hun, you think you know more about this then we do but we here are still trying to educate you. Please do not start a topic like this if your going to blow off everything we say.

    Quote:
    There is probably no more than three stallions at this barn that are "troublemakers" like you guys are saying ALL stallions are.
    and once again, we arent saying all stallions are. Honestly, im done posting here. Its useless
         
        08-12-2008, 08:20 AM
      #53
    Green Broke
    Ok. Hi folks.

    I can quite honestly not recall the alert button being hit so much in such a short space of time. Thanks for alerting us to this thread.

    If "Anyone" has a problem with another member, they need to contact admin or another Moderator, please don't start verbally abusing another member in public on the forum, for one it isn't nice, and goes against the whole purpose of the forum. This forum is a friendly community, where members of all ages, and from all over the world come together to talk horse! I for one will do my upmost to make sure it stays that way, as I'm sure many of you members will agree.

    I've removed all of the posts from where the abuse began. Can we please get back to topic?

    I'm not going to discuss any member within a thread, so again, like I said if anybody has a problem, issue or concern about another member, Please contact the Horseforum Team.

    Thanks for the alerts everyone.
         
        08-16-2008, 05:17 AM
      #54
    Foal
    Quote:
    And I understand that you're "trying" to "educate" me about something I know more about than you do.
    and yet you rode and cared for a stallion for one year without noticing that he was not a gelding?

    Something caught my eye, you mentioned a stallion killed by a mare? I would not blame the stallion, nor would I blame the mare. I blame the owners who put the two together. It is a perfect example of what can happen...

    Stallions are not fire breathing dragons out to kill everything and anything they see, BUT they have a greater potential to become one... I guess it is all about the odds for me. The "coolness" of owning a stallion is just not worth the chance that he might attack someones horse, or breed someones mare, or seriously injure me because he had a burst of hormones and there happened to be a mare in heat on the other side of the fence... yes, a gelding or mare could do those things, but they are LESS LIKELY TO DO SO.

    AND stallions do often mount mares who are not in heat. This can injure the mare quite seriously.

    Here (Iceland) we run our horses in semi wild herds, but we never leave a stallion with the herd unattended, and never for any other reason than breeding.
         
        08-16-2008, 11:48 PM
      #55
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rosa
    Quote:
    And I understand that you're "trying" to "educate" me about something I know more about than you do.
    and yet you rode and cared for a stallion for one year without noticing that he was not a gelding?

    Something caught my eye, you mentioned a stallion killed by a mare? I would not blame the stallion, nor would I blame the mare. I blame the owners who put the two together. It is a perfect example of what can happen...

    Stallions are not fire breathing dragons out to kill everything and anything they see, BUT they have a greater potential to become one... I guess it is all about the odds for me. The "coolness" of owning a stallion is just not worth the chance that he might attack someones horse, or breed someones mare, or seriously injure me because he had a burst of hormones and there happened to be a mare in heat on the other side of the fence... yes, a gelding or mare could do those things, but they are LESS LIKELY TO DO SO.

    AND stallions do often mount mares who are not in heat. This can injure the mare quite seriously.

    Here (Iceland) we run our horses in semi wild herds, but we never leave a stallion with the herd unattended, and never for any other reason than breeding.
    i agree!
         
        08-18-2008, 03:15 PM
      #56
    Yearling
    Reasons for Gelding....

    Male horses are often gelded to make them better behaved and easier to control.

    Gelding a male horse can reduce potential conflicts within domestic horse herds.

    Geldings are preferred over stallions for working purposes
    Because they are calmer, easier to handle, and more tractable.

    Gelding can also remove lower-quality animals from the gene pool


    I honestly own a stud myself, and I couldn't ask for a better behaved
    Gentle boy, but gelding him is for the best and for his best.

    But I do agree, you DO NOT need to consider a stally if you are
    Not experienced with them and can handle some of their
    aggressive behavior qualities, also if you own a stallion and
    do not plan on breeding him...why keep him a stud? I can't
    Understand people sometimes...


    Hope your having a good day guys!
         
        08-22-2008, 07:36 PM
      #57
    Foal
    (Ok, I have not read many posts, just stating why it isn't safe or practical to own a stallion)


    Stallions can be more difficult to control and they constantly need correction. Stallions have a lot of personality and need a good, strong handler that won't allow them to be pushy and arrogant around other horses. Only a professional should be handling a stallion, and I personally think a stallion used for just riding should be gelded. It's a HUGE liability to keep a stallion! Accidents happen all the time but I can assure you they are more frequent with stallions.

    Stallions do have interesting personalities which at times make them more enjoyable to work with so why not look for a horse that is more active on the left side of the brain? Typically these horses have a stallion like personality (very outgoing and opinionated) and can be pushy however they are less dangerous to work with. They do need constant changes and interesting training techniques to keep them entertained but it's worth it if you want a horse with a lot of personality and heart.

    Stallions are more aggressive than geldings and mares because of one (main) thing, testosterone. Testosterone drives the stallions aggressive and instinctual behavior. If a stallion is not trained, handled correctly and taught to control it's instinct then it will be extremely dangerous. Even the most docile stallion can be deadly to an inexperienced horseman.

    When a stallion is gelded the amount of testosterone in the blood drops which makes them MUCH easier to handle. OCCASIONALLY you will find a mare or gelding more aggressive than a stallion but the reasoning behind it is usually neurological or neglect/cruelty. Of course their are a few mares and geldings that are alpha (but not dangerous), but these horses generally learn they can pick on others without consequences.
         
        09-15-2008, 10:30 PM
      #58
    Foal
    I personally would love to own a stallion...
    But ONLY if it was stunning breeding quality and had the training and calm temperment, (which many do.) and was talented in its disipline.
    Horses are very sociable animals and often the life of a stallion can be lonely, if it wasnt breeding quality then it will make just as nice a gelding, and will get to have a nice social life.
    My gelding always tries soo hard to do whatever I ask, he's so sensitive. A horse will always try for you (Gelding, mare or stallion) if they have been correctly trained and raised. And time has been spent on building a relationship.
         
        09-15-2008, 11:27 PM
      #59
    Weanling
    I love your avatar! ^^^^
         
        09-16-2008, 12:28 AM
      #60
    Yearling
    Just to give my opinion, I wouldn't suggest that anyone get a stallion unless they have a real interest in breeding. Really, I don't see a purpose in keeping something breeding-able if it isn't the best of the best. In my opinion, stallion ownership requires a lot more training and knowledge then with a mare or gelding, regardless of how sweet he is. If you are looking for a simple riding horse I don't see why anyone even consider getting a stallion...
         

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