Steering
 
 

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Steering

This is a discussion on Steering within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • How to steer a horse while riding
  • Can't steer horse

 
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    08-03-2011, 09:52 PM
  #1
Foal
Steering

Hi

I am having problems with steering. If it's a well-schooled mature horse, I have no issues. But when it's young horse with a mind of its own or one who is not happy about riding when it's close to his dinner-time, I can't seem to steer the horse at all. NO matter how much leg aid I apply, or how much I work the reins to make it go in the direction I want; the horse just refuses. When I can't control the horse or at least make it go where I want, my instant reaction is to let it go where it wants.. or to slow it down... in order to avoid him jerking very hard and therefore, an accident. I just had a lesson yesterday which didn't go anywhere as a result of me not being able to steer the horse well. The instructor said it's because I don't have much strength in my arms; but I differ. I actually work out a lot on my arms. I am wondering if it's because I am not assertive enough on the horse. But I find that having hard reins desensitise the horse..

ARgh.. what I should do? I feel very discouraged of late..Why do I keep getting stubborn horses? SInce I can't change a horse, I need to work on the way I ride them. If other people can; why can't I?
     
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    08-03-2011, 10:33 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
That's the intereseting thing about riding , we are on an animal, with a mind of it's own. And when it comes to "steering", it isn't a machine that is literally made to go a certain direction. Rather, we use the reins and our legs and all to ask the horse to go in the direction we want. The horse has the choice to go along with our request, or ignore it. But, as you know, we must get obedience to our requests, so , yes, we must ask stronger.
Ask, tell, demand. First we kind of ask or suggest a turn, then we say "we are going right", then we say, "go right, now!". If you allow the horse to make those decisions himself, then he will make more and more decisions himslef and that could be frightening because you are on the back of a large animal that has no real connection to you. You then become a helpless passenger.

So, the long and the short of that, is that you DO have to be more assertive. It's good that you have a concern about not wanting to make the horse even harder in his mouth by hauling on the rein. But, unfortunately, you have to get him to respond and you will have to do whatever it takes.

YOu can either smack him, and I would , if he were just walking off in a direction that was in complete disobedience to my clear command. I would give him a smart little smack on the bum and when he jiumped, which he will, I'd reaffirm my command with the reins and get him mvoing forward again. Once you lose forward momentum it's harder to steer a horse. So sometimes, just get forward in any direction and then pick up the rein in the direction you want to go. Sometimes, if you get into a kind of tug of war, yoiu have to break things out of the deadlock.
In fact, when it comes to pulling on the rein, if I pick up a rein, say to go right, and the hrose is like a dead weight on the end, I will lift the rein higher and put a matching pressure to the horse and ONE OUNCE MORE. If the horse pulls on the rein, I will meet his pull but not exactly. If I meet it, I keep us in the place of a stalemate. You must not stop in the stalemate. So, meet his pressure and one ounce more.
The trick to not making the horse a hard mouthed horse is that when he does finally give to your pressure, you reward him with a bit release of pressure. If you do this a lot, and are very fair and consistent, you will build in greater willingness on the horse's part to respond sooner and lighter to your rein pressure. But you have to be spot on about giving a release AFTER he gives. HOres must give first!

On a schoool horse it is a real challenge and unlikely that you can really retrain him. So, you must becomes more assertive. STronger and use the crop if necessary. Watch how the trainer does it, and mimic her assertiveness. Don't be scared of angering the horse. He'll get over it.
     
    08-03-2011, 10:54 PM
  #3
Foal
Ok I shall try again. Three weeks ago I was doing well during an intensive riding programme while on holiday; steering well, doing serpentines and cantering (I even rode an intermediate horse). BUt somehow eversince I rode on a very uncooperative horse back home; I just feel that all horses seem to be bullying me and I am back to being a complete beginner.

I am wondering if I have completely unlearnt everything :(

Thanks for your tips tinyling

I shall persevere despite being so demoralised..
     
    08-03-2011, 10:56 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
That's the intereseting thing about riding , we are on an animal, with a mind of it's own. And when it comes to "steering", it isn't a machine that is literally made to go a certain direction. Rather, we use the reins and our legs and all to ask the horse to go in the direction we want. The horse has the choice to go along with our request, or ignore it. But, as you know, we must get obedience to our requests, so , yes, we must ask stronger.
Ask, tell, demand. First we kind of ask or suggest a turn, then we say "we are going right", then we say, "go right, now!". If you allow the horse to make those decisions himself, then he will make more and more decisions himslef and that could be frightening because you are on the back of a large animal that has no real connection to you. You then become a helpless passenger.

So, the long and the short of that, is that you DO have to be more assertive. It's good that you have a concern about not wanting to make the horse even harder in his mouth by hauling on the rein. But, unfortunately, you have to get him to respond and you will have to do whatever it takes.

YOu can either smack him, and I would , if he were just walking off in a direction that was in complete disobedience to my clear command. I would give him a smart little smack on the bum and when he jiumped, which he will, I'd reaffirm my command with the reins and get him mvoing forward again. Once you lose forward momentum it's harder to steer a horse. So sometimes, just get forward in any direction and then pick up the rein in the direction you want to go. Sometimes, if you get into a kind of tug of war, yoiu have to break things out of the deadlock.
In fact, when it comes to pulling on the rein, if I pick up a rein, say to go right, and the hrose is like a dead weight on the end, I will lift the rein higher and put a matching pressure to the horse and ONE OUNCE MORE. If the horse pulls on the rein, I will meet his pull but not exactly. If I meet it, I keep us in the place of a stalemate. You must not stop in the stalemate. So, meet his pressure and one ounce more.
The trick to not making the horse a hard mouthed horse is that when he does finally give to your pressure, you reward him with a bit release of pressure. If you do this a lot, and are very fair and consistent, you will build in greater willingness on the horse's part to respond sooner and lighter to your rein pressure. But you have to be spot on about giving a release AFTER he gives. HOres must give first!

On a schoool horse it is a real challenge and unlikely that you can really retrain him. So, you must becomes more assertive. STronger and use the crop if necessary. Watch how the trainer does it, and mimic her assertiveness. Don't be scared of angering the horse. He'll get over it.

Very well said. Great advice. The Ask, Tell, Demand method works very well and always reward the horse by releasing the pressure when they do it right.
     
    08-04-2011, 01:06 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
Mavis,
You might just be in a slump and that is a bummer, if that is the case. But we all know that "slumps" happen, but they do pass. Just about the time you notice it as a slump, it'll be gone, that's my guess.

When you are relatively new to riding you need to be on horses that understand the cues well. A green horse doesn't know the cues so well, so there's bound to be a lot of confusion on both sides of the saddle.

You'll pass through this slump and go on for a bit then on to the next challenge. I am in a bit of a slump lately too, with some spooking problems. Never free from some sort of challenge.
     

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