Stop your horse vs "ask him to stop" - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Stop your horse vs "ask him to stop"

This is a discussion on Stop your horse vs "ask him to stop" within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    Like Tree15Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-15-2012, 11:47 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Exactly, I agree with you on the asking vs, stopping. That can be a very big difference for many people and disciplines.

    Barrel horses definitely know to head for home after the third barrel..Sorry you had a not so fun experiences with it though, it really is a ton of fun when you get the hang of it.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-15-2012, 11:54 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    In this case I am only referring to pleasure riding, I understand that sometimes during somethings no matter how broke your horse is you cannot simply ask and receive. =)
         
        02-15-2012, 11:57 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    I pat myself on the back for being a reasonably ballsy older rider, considering I started riding rather late in life. But I am very much aware of things I will never do, and one of them is barrel racing. I do SO regret not getting into horses earlier.
    Now where is that time machine when you need it?
    Skipsfirstspike likes this.
         
        02-16-2012, 12:47 AM
      #14
    Trained
    I would love to give barrel racing a go, but there is no one that does it around here! Big jump from flouncy dressage rider to wanting to give barrels a go :P But it looks like so much fun!!!!

    As for stopping - I guess in all disciplines the general principal is the same - that you give the horse some kind of warning of what you want to do, rather than just hauling on the reins out of nowhere an expecting an immediate stop.
    In dressage, we try to set the horse up for success, to make a well balanced transition to the halt. So in the steps in the lead up to the halt, are spent rebalancing, making sure the horse is as engaged as his level of training allows, and that as soon as we ask for the stop, the horse will be able to easily sit on its haunches, and stop without losing balance.
         
        02-16-2012, 12:52 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Kayty, you could do it...Really, I have loads of respect for Dressage and eventers, I don't think it's flouncy at all, you have to have SO much control at all times.. I would feel like the most awkward person if I tried it. With anything new you just have to stick with it until you start to get it..
         
        02-16-2012, 01:00 AM
      #16
    Showing
    Oh my..

    I wish I could ask my horse to stop and he'd listen. Transitions are great, both up and down (though canter is a bit rough..) Stopping?? Oh heck no. You could knit a sweater and grow your very own beard before he stopped!

    He does this really weird walking 0.4 miles an hour "shuffle".. and then 3 minutes later he'll stop. No matter how much pressure you put on the reins.

    It's such a weird concept to him, standing still, slowing down, not running for his life..

    Maybe when I get back he'll be better at it. I never did learn how to properly stop so I've just been kind of sitting up taller but sinking down, stopping motion in my hips and slowly close my fingers around the reins. And I know he's paying attention... but I don't think he knows what I mean. Even if I say ho, he won't do it. Even on the ground, I always have to step in front of his shoulder to get him to stop.

    And obviously me hauling on the reins doesn't help the situation at all.. but when he does stop, it's a beautiful square ASAP halt. But it rarely happens!
         
        02-16-2012, 01:06 AM
      #17
    Trained
    They are certainly very different disciplines, hence I'd love to give it a go. I do like to get a feel for what other people do, I think doing the same thing day in day out gives you quite a narrow mind on your riding. So though I am a dressage rider through and through, I am a bit of a thrill seaker as well! I love nothing more than taking my horses out to the beach or through the forrest and going for a mad gallop. Can't beat the adrenelin rush :)
    Dressage I get a rush from, but a different type of rush. It feeds my perfectionist nature, and I get a great feeling of satisfaction in working for perfection. The same sort of satisfaction I get from doing a really good piece of art!

    Hmmmm you've got me keen to try my hand at something different now! I have never ridden in a western saddle... I've ridden breakers in an Aussie/Stock saddle, (that god for those knee blocks when they turn bronc! Sitting out tantrums in a dressage saddle certainly puts the wind up you :S
         
        02-16-2012, 01:15 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    They are certainly very different disciplines, hence I'd love to give it a go. I do like to get a feel for what other people do, I think doing the same thing day in day out gives you quite a narrow mind on your riding. So though I am a dressage rider through and through, I am a bit of a thrill seaker as well! I love nothing more than taking my horses out to the beach or through the forrest and going for a mad gallop. Can't beat the adrenelin rush :)
    Dressage I get a rush from, but a different type of rush. It feeds my perfectionist nature, and I get a great feeling of satisfaction in working for perfection. The same sort of satisfaction I get from doing a really good piece of art!

    Hmmmm you've got me keen to try my hand at something different now! I have never ridden in a western saddle... I've ridden breakers in an Aussie/Stock saddle, (that god for those knee blocks when they turn bronc! Sitting out tantrums in a dressage saddle certainly puts the wind up you :S
    Exactly! I think this is how it is with every discipline. I would rather a perfectly correct and pretty run than have a fast time and be all over the place anyday..

    I think when a rider stops have those adrenaline rushes they need to take a step back and take a break from riding that discipline..If you aren't having fun and not loving every minute of it your horse and judges know it. After growing up and riding in so many different settings and Western and English, I have a great respect and open mind for the other disciplines and riders..I may poke fun at my friends who ride English but I would never bash them..I can't even post on the right diagonal half of the time, and it irritates me so much!
         
        02-16-2012, 01:35 AM
      #19
    Trained
    There seems to be a very big Western riding culture in the US. Here in Australia, there is very little. Some, there's the usual QH's and Aussie stock horses, but english is certainly a much bigger scene. Where I live in particular, you do a double take when you see a horse decked out in western gear because you hardly see it!!
         
        02-16-2012, 01:41 AM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Even though Western riders out number English riders in Georgia, there are still quite a bit of English people..Especially living so close to Perry, and the Georgia National Ag Center, we see a huge variety of disciplines here..My aunt and uncle, before divorcing last year, owned one of the highest ranked training barns in Georgia. They trained and gave lessons in everything from Western Pleasure, Reining, English Equitation, HUS, Showmanship..the whole deal..I worked with them as much as possible and tried to get my hands on everything..
    Kayty likes this.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:30 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0