A strong cob with her head on the floor!
 
 

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A strong cob with her head on the floor!

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  • Horse working with head on floor

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    04-22-2014, 04:30 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation A strong cob with her head on the floor!

Hi,

I've been riding a cob mare for about 7 months now. When I first rode her she was very forward going but strong. I like the forward going... and we have cracked the strength in the school she goes lovely in there now, but as soon as I take her in the field or into an arena it all goes to pot. She's in a snaffle. She has jumped most of her life and loves it, but the past few months she's started to refuse jumps and then canters off with her head really low... therefore I can't pull her up and it take me a good five minutes to stop her. Any advice? I'd love to take her to shows jumping but her refusing and then cantering off with her head low makes me nervous like I'm out of control, I really want to take her cross country aswell but I am not going just to be out of control!

Thanks!!
     
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    04-22-2014, 04:32 PM
  #2
Yearling
Is she in pain anywhere? With refusing jumps, that's what I would check first.
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    04-22-2014, 04:38 PM
  #3
Foal
Her legs are fine, I haven't noticed any problems with her back I ride her fine! She does jump when you are very strong and really push her over it with the leg and whip. But last time she reared too which is concerning me.
     
    04-22-2014, 04:40 PM
  #4
Started
Has a vet checked her out?
You may think she's fine, but there could be an underlying problem..
You shouldn't be having to beat her over a jump, you should like her to be willing and light about it.

I really suggest having a vet/chiropractor out and perhaps a saddle fitter.
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    04-22-2014, 04:41 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmajt93    
Her legs are fine, I haven't noticed any problems with her back I ride her fine! She does jump when you are very strong and really push her over it with the leg and whip. But last time she reared too which is concerning me.
You don't know if there is anything wrong with his horses back or teeth. Get out a chiropractor and a horse dentist. Also a saddle fitter should probably come out.
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    04-22-2014, 04:44 PM
  #6
Foal
Yes when I first started riding her she did exactly that. Then we came into a double and she hesitated but went over the first, she hadn't picked up enough momentum and refused the second and I fell. Ever since then the first jump she's set up to she tries to run out of it or just refuses.
     
    04-22-2014, 04:46 PM
  #7
Started
I still think she should be checked over by medical professionals
And that maybe you should take a few lessons. Having a ground person to talk you through the jumps would be nice.
You need to come back to the basics and get your seat secure and learn to control her strides and her power. You both have to get back in sync.
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    04-22-2014, 04:50 PM
  #8
Foal
We have had quite a few lessons, and none of them have ever expressed concerns about her. Dentist is coming tomorrow but I really don't think it's teeth as she accepts the bit very nicely. If anything its her back, and I don't know much about that. I'll have to see if anybody around my area could come and have a look.
     
    04-22-2014, 04:52 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmajt93    
Yes when I first started riding her she did exactly that. Then we came into a double and she hesitated but went over the first, she hadn't picked up enough momentum and refused the second and I fell. Ever since then the first jump she's set up to she tries to run out of it or just refuses.
Though you should have a vet come out to check her over, this sounds like more of a training problem. When a horse learns that they can get out of something, they will. She learned that if she refuses you will come off. Same thing happened with my mare. Go back to square one. Start at ground poles/cavaletti, then ground poles with very low jump. Slowly build up the jumps. If you do it right then you will be back up to doing what you were before quickly. But don't rush it. Wait until she is comfortably and happily jumping over the low jump before you raise the jump any. Every time you raise the jump, work on going over it until she is comfortable and willing over it, and then you can raise it again.
     
    04-22-2014, 04:57 PM
  #10
Trained
Having seen the amazing difference in my boy since he saw the Chiro and the dentist I would always start from there and work up.

I have a horse who was so stoic that he was hiding a lot of pain from his teeth, and now they are fixed he is a different horse, throw in some chiro work and a $10 shim to help balance his saddle, and we have a whole different way of going.
     

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