Take the fall, or hang on to the horse's face? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
 81Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 73 Old 03-02-2013, 07:35 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 3,888
• Horses: 2
When my nasty witch of a QH was intentionally trying to fling me off, you better believe I didn't give a rats a$$ about her mouth. Come hell or high water, I was staying on her because if I had landed on the ground she would have happily stomped me into an oblivion.

All other "unintentional dismounts" I toss the reins because my goal is to land as far away from the horse (and it's hooves) as possible. I'd rather walk or summon help with my cell phone than get stomped on accidentally.
Delfina is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 73 Old 03-02-2013, 09:32 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 461
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
Don't you just hate that feeling, when you realize you are past the point of recovery, when you say to yourself, "I'm goin' down!" and then, BAM! Instant chiropractic . I always here all my back joints crack. Sometimes, it's just that, and not much else. Other times, I feel like I was just tossed against a brick wall. I usually cuss like a mad sailor.
Ugh I'm like that now that I'm all old and creaky. When I was younger I did martial arts and my instructor was a Parkour master. We practiced throws, rolls, and falls from high places. I was in complete control of my falls and could avoid damage to myself and spring to my feet like nothing happened. If I did that stuff now I would just splatter...

I've been trained to use my hands to aid in avoiding damage to myself and safe recovery so holding onto the reins isn't even second nature to me. Unless I'm in an environment where a bunch of people and horses are at risk of my horse bolting into them (which none of my horses have been the "ditch the evidence" type) I do not care where the horse goes as long as I am safe. I've seen people pull the horse down on top of them by holding onto the reins.
Canterklutz is offline  
post #23 of 73 Old 03-02-2013, 09:39 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,183
• Horses: 0
At the "moment of departure" I have had very little time to think about anything. One moment on the horse...next moment suspended like a Warner Brothers cartoon character before impact.
If I know I am in danger of losing control, my choice is to get off while I can, handle whatever the issue is and go on our way. I have walked a distance more than once with the horse trailing, but I am not a youngster and I don't heal as fast as I did several centuries ago. And for my efforts I am still upright and live to ride another day. : )

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
Dustbunny is offline  
post #24 of 73 Old 03-03-2013, 07:00 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Subtropics
Posts: 244
• Horses: 1
I would think the reaction leading to a fall would differ on discipline; as a Jumper from my original training, I'd never hang onto the reins not just in concern for the horse's mouth, but because I could pull the horse down with me going high-speed around a course; I would much rather let whatever horse my mount is at the time (not just my current mare but any other) take a gamble around the remaining course rather than yank him around at 30+mph next to 4ft oxers. But if I'm out on a trail and if I should ever slip, with any horse, I would hang on at the buckle to make sure the horse doesn't go running into any roads. There's a difference between falling during flatwork, and falling in the Jumping ring... I've seen awful incidents where people unintentionally yank a spooking horse's mouth and the sucker backflips, too. I'm weird about falling, I get one of those self-enlightening life-before-your-eyes moments where time stops and I think about several different things before hitting the ground xD
TerciopeladoCaballo is offline  
post #25 of 73 Old 03-03-2013, 08:07 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Wisconsin
Posts: 2,043
• Horses: 2
I usually find myself hanging on until I feel the horse jerk on the end of the reins. Maybe it's because I'm not really thinking of letting go or hanging on as I'm flying through the air, or because most of the horses I've ridden stopped the instant I was on the ground...even my rescue horse who still, after two years of working together and riding, will buck at random times and is extremely unreasonable. But, I can tell you that I'm not consciously thinking of whether I should hang on or let go. It's always a sub-conscious thought.

To see the wind's power, the rain's cleansing, and the sun's radiant life, one need only to look at the horse.
TheRoughrider21 is offline  
post #26 of 73 Old 03-03-2013, 08:26 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In the saddle.
Posts: 5,157
• Horses: 1
One thing I have learned over the years of dealing with high powered WBs (for dressage) is that you do not, under any circumstances, let go.
Yes, I get dragged, yes the horse gets jerked on when it happens. But there are no injuries, which is the main thing.
Lunging, leading, riding, you do not let go.

I think it is different in many other disciplines and with different horses but I would rather wrench my arm, get dirt down my pants and have a horse with a sore palette than deal with broken limbs or trying to catch the buggered horse for 45 minutes (yes it has happened in a 80'x200' enclosed arena with about 4 people).

They say money doesn't buy happiness -- well happiness doesn't buy horses!
~*~anebel~*~ is offline  
post #27 of 73 Old 03-03-2013, 08:56 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,712
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ View Post
One thing I have learned over the years of dealing with high powered WBs (for dressage) is that you do not, under any circumstances, let go.
Yes, I get dragged, yes the horse gets jerked on when it happens. But there are no injuries, which is the main thing.
Lunging, leading, riding, you do not let go.

I think it is different in many other disciplines and with different horses but I would rather wrench my arm, get dirt down my pants and have a horse with a sore palette than deal with broken limbs or trying to catch the buggered horse for 45 minutes (yes it has happened in a 80'x200' enclosed arena with about 4 people).
Yeah I've seen it happen on the track.....horse gallops 5 rounds on race day morning when it's supposed to be doing a quite stretchy leg half round.....old bugger still raced and won later that evening!
Muppetgirl is offline  
post #28 of 73 Old 03-08-2013, 06:31 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Alabama,USA
Posts: 3,909
• Horses: 1
It seems like every time I fall I instinctively let go, or either lose my grip.

I only remember one time when I hung on and it was one of the holy-crap-a-scary-bush-I-am-going-to-slam-on-the-brakes-and-send-you-flying-over-my-head times. The reins just slipped over her head with me. LOL.

Other than that, I usually let go. Sure, I've had to chase down some ponies, but no dislocated shoulder!

"There's nothing more humbling on the planet than horses." --Sean Crocker
Sunny is offline  
post #29 of 73 Old 03-09-2013, 08:12 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 292
• Horses: 0
I'm pretty young, and at this point I've only fallen off once. I was trotting bareback for the first time, and I cued him to go back to a walk, and the stupid thing sped up! I, very gracefully, slowly slid off his right side, was only able to curl halfway, since it was only off a 14.2hh pony, and was immediately up. Bruised ribs, small cut on my elbow. Put the saddle back on and rode more.

I let go of the reins when I was perpendicular to his head- I didn't want to pull him towards me.
Kotori is offline  
post #30 of 73 Old 03-09-2013, 09:26 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Some times Llanelian - North wales, sometimes Hull in East Yorkshire (UK)
Posts: 3,679
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ View Post
One thing I have learned over the years of dealing with high powered WBs (for dressage) is that you do not, under any circumstances, let go.
Yes, I get dragged, yes the horse gets jerked on when it happens. But there are no injuries, which is the main thing.
Lunging, leading, riding, you do not let go.

I think it is different in many other disciplines and with different horses but I would rather wrench my arm, get dirt down my pants and have a horse with a sore palette than deal with broken limbs or trying to catch the buggered horse for 45 minutes (yes it has happened in a 80'x200' enclosed arena with about 4 people).
I'm deffinaty of the same mind, Except it was a connie who taught me never to let go!
I'd rather hang on to a horses mouth than end up in a worse situation, perticularly when a horse is trying to get you off.

RIDE your horse FORWARDS and keep him STRAIGHT

faye is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Face highlighter on white face horse? MakeMeAMemory Horse Grooming 6 02-19-2013 05:56 PM
Lets see your bald face/wide blaze/blue eye/apron face horses sommsama09 Horse Pictures 46 12-17-2012 11:04 PM
Am I actually getting the hang of this........ SportHorseHeaven Horse Colors and Genetics 4 01-13-2012 08:59 AM
Let go or Hang on??? livestoride Horse Riding 14 05-17-2011 03:20 PM
How to hang a harness for a draft horse hobbyfarmer Horse Tack and Equipment 8 07-14-2010 08:54 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome