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Throwing head around in halt

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        01-05-2012, 06:29 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    With that additional info, it sounds like the horse wasn't taught to carry himself and was not taught the release as a reward. He is probably barn sour and tired of always having contact in his mouth.

    I would strongly consider looking at another barn for lessons, you definitely want to learn to ride in a way that compliments and works with the horse so that the horse works with you. In turn you'll learn soft hands, soft contact etc...which will in turn build your own confidence.

    Not your fault you are being taught this way, but one of the biggest rewards for a horse while riding them is the release and it would be a great tool for you to work with! :)
         
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        01-05-2012, 06:42 PM
      #22
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by vergo97    
    I don't think they can re-train the horses because they have little money and not that many people work there. They tend to try to train them not to do things in lessons.

    I don't think he does it to stretch, it is an insistant tugging and it stops as soon as I let go of the reins. I asked my instructor what I should do when he does it, and she said let go of the reins.

    I'm not allowed to give soft contact, I am told to tighten up my reins a lot, more than I think I should, when I go into trot and even more when going into canter (probably because the faster he goes, the harder it is to slow him down). Once when I was trying to slow him down I relased a bit and I got told not to do that until he has done completely what I want him to do (like if i'm going from trot to walk, I should only release a bit when he has gone to walk, not if he slows down in trot a bit)

    But to he honest, I haven't really been taught about release as a reward. All I am told it to tighten up my reins. I only learnt about release from this forum.
    In which I also agree highly with that smrobs said.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    Unfortunately, from what you've said, your instructor has been enforcing this behavior in the horse for quite some time. Whenever he pulls and you throw him the slack in the reins, that is effectively teaching him to brace on the bit and pull constantly. So, that makes him harder to collect, harder to stop, and harder to control. It would likely take an experienced trainer and quite a long time to correct this behavior. BUT, even if it was corrected by a trainer, unless your instructor changed her teaching methods, the same problem would come right back.
    I think you shouldn't be in group lessons.. because you aren't getting the instruction you need. Also I think you shouldn't be riding with this instructor and her horses, because she's teaching him HORRID habits that will most definitely making riding hard and not fun and frustrating for you or the horse.

    Personally.. from where you are at now.. I would much rather see you lease a horse than take these lessons. Some people that lease, offer to give lessons or some horses are huge babysitters that take care of their peeps. Or maybe you could start doing chores around the house to afford both.

    They have a saying.. "perfect practice makes for near perfect." If you continue to have cruddy lessons.. you start riding cruddy.. and then every horse you touch starts being cruddy with you, instead of soft and giving and responsive and willing.

    It's hard to convince non horsey people what is correct and what isn't--for the case of your mom. Mine thought I was being taught wonderfully for yeaaars. Little did she know how terrible the instruction I got, how dangerous, and how habit forming it was. Lucky for me we moved so much that I never got past trot. But even then I didn't know how to trot until I started volunteering at a therapeutic riding center.. and I learned everything! (except canter and dressage movements..)

    Find another stable where you can take private or semi private (2 people max!) lessons so you can get the instruction you're paying for!

    Seriously, I have a horse and I would totally teach you with him how to ride. I'm sure there are many other horse owners too with horses to lease that would do the same.

    =/ sorry you're in this situation.. just try to get out of it. Maybe research and find some other riding schools and email them or call them and just talk about it. It'd help your case with your mom and by talking it through with the possible instructors, you can find one that is willing to help you become a rider.. instead of a frustrated passenger.

    Hopefully I wasn't rude.. I don't intend to be! :)
    smrobs likes this.
         
        01-06-2012, 01:03 PM
      #23
    Foal
    Yes, I feel like my instructor is reinforcing the behaviour too which is why I don't like to let him have all the rein. If I let Charlie have any rein when we are moving he goes really fast.

    My mum was thinking of phoning up to get a private lesson so that I can improve a bit more but we might not do that because I might get an instructor that is not that good. The instructor that I am talking about at the moment is the best one at the stables.

    I will ask my mum if I can try out a lesson that a stable that I like the look of, so we can compare the stables and she might see the difference and realise that the stables I am at at the moment has badly behaved horses.

    It's a lot of money she is paying and I don't want to be wasting her money.

    I keep getting told I am being just a passenger in my lessons, but I don't know how not to be!

    If there is a horse for lease that includes lessons, is it the owner of the horse teaching? I would like to lease a horse, but I would have to go for one that includes lessons. My mum pays 20 a week and cannot afford any more (I think that $40?).
         
        01-06-2012, 01:09 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    It's hard to learn to be a rider and not a passenger in your situation. I would definitely see about a different lesson horse/instructor and if that is not possible private lessons will at least get you in the right direction.

    A horse that is properly trained should not run away as soon as they have a loose rein as they should be listening for the leg cues to tell them when to speed up or slow down. When riding, try to keep your legs really relaxed and not squeezing him as you pst or sitting trot and see if that helps. I know with my mare when she is hot to go the best way to slow her downis to relax my lower half and think of melting butter....typically she will slow right down.
         
        01-06-2012, 02:40 PM
      #25
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by vergo97    
    yes, I feel like my instructor is reinforcing the behaviour too which is why I don't like to let him have all the rein. If I let Charlie have any rein when we are moving he goes really fast.

    My mum was thinking of phoning up to get a private lesson so that I can improve a bit more but we might not do that because I might get an instructor that is not that good. The instructor that I am talking about at the moment is the best one at the stables.

    I will ask my mum if I can try out a lesson that a stable that I like the look of, so we can compare the stables and she might see the difference and realise that the stables I am at at the moment has badly behaved horses.

    It's a lot of money she is paying and I don't want to be wasting her money.

    I keep getting told I am being just a passenger in my lessons, but I don't know how not to be!

    If there is a horse for lease that includes lessons, is it the owner of the horse teaching? I would like to lease a horse, but I would have to go for one that includes lessons. My mum pays 20 a week and cannot afford any more (I think that $40?).
    Well I think you could get a very nice partial lease of 1-2 days a week with a lesson with that money! It's all about finding the right person.

    Sometimes the owner teaches.. other times you find someone and split costs (because you are riding their horse, therefore inadvertently training it) and sometimes you are responsible for lessons.

    I can see how that would be frustrating.. it sounds like you are being over-horsed, rushed without explaining the little things, and just plain ignored in terms of needing help visually.. and getting none in return from your instructor--someone whom you pay to TEACH you, not yell at you and stick you on barn sour or habit filled mounts.

    It's worth researching, I guarantee it!

    Until then you're going to keep being a passenger unless they stick you on a better horse that doesn't give you as much grief and your instructor starts instructing.

    Maybe a private lesson would be different, OP. I know in group lessons, they can be stressful and not all problems are addressed. I think you should try to get at least 1 private lesson, regardless of the instructor.. and see how that goes for you.

    Good luck! Big hugs! :)
         
        01-06-2012, 04:25 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    Sorry you are going through this!

    Quote:
    The lesson horses seem to mainly respond to the reins though, if I try to use my legs to control the direction, they just think I want them to go faster.
    I had this exact issue with the lesson horse at my last barn. I had two prior horses that I was able to stop with mostly my seat and very little rein. So I know it wasn't me. To get this one mare to stop I had to keep pulling back harder and harder. If she was stopped and I released, she'd start walking again. So not only did I have to pull back hard, but I had to continue pulling back and even then it was like a loooong screeching halt.
    Honestly, just ask to switch horses. If Charlie is like my old lesson horse was, then he is only going to respond to an experienced rider but the horsey version of screw you to a beginner.

    Normally I don't agree with the person who thinks it's always the horse's fault and never their own. But if one horse is giving you trouble, there's no harm in switching.
    In your case, I don't know....this barn sounds a little strange. Your choice of horses are buckers, biters or ignorers?
         

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