Tips on getting my horse to stop on command?
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Tips on getting my horse to stop on command?

This is a discussion on Tips on getting my horse to stop on command? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Horse has trouble stopping
  • How to i get my horse to whoa

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-02-2011, 06:00 PM
  #1
Foal
Tips on getting my horse to stop on command?

The horse I'm riding has a problem with stopping. Sometimes she will go faster than she is supposed to, such as taking off in a gallop or canter when I trot her, or trotting when I only want her to walk and then I have difficulty stopping her, and she will continue to keep going fast. Or sometimes she will stop but she will elaborate on it and stretch it out. But I want to get her to be better trained so I was wondering if anyone had any tips on how to get her to stop on command. We had to changed her bit a while back and that has helped her improve, but I want to be able to stop her with less try.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-03-2011, 12:15 AM
  #2
Weanling
My TB had the exact same problem. It was the bit. My TB has a very sensitive mouth so I try to avoid using a bit and ride bitless as much as possible. She stops/slows down way better in just a halter and leadrope that a simple snaffle.

It could also be the saddle not fitting correctly. When she speeds up, she may be trying to 'run' from the pain. Also try to use your seat, not just pull back on the reins.
     
    04-03-2011, 12:23 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Okay, I'm thinking you need some lessons.
Is your horse Off the track?
Maybe some background info on your horse would help
     
    04-03-2011, 05:55 AM
  #4
Foal
I was about to say the same thing, I think to help you we need some more details: the horse's background, past life, how do you ride him, do you groundwork? My horse had lots of trouble coming to a still too (he is a French trotter...) and I used voice (an "aaaahoooo stop", "au pas", trotter"), my breathing too, my seat, and above all I gave him a treat and a break (either dismount or simply stay calm and stroke him where he really likes it) whenever he seemed to improve a bit. Alos use always the same "scale of aids", you know: 1 voice, 2 seat and back (I use the image of a tree, that is quite common I think, your upper body stretches upward as if to catch more light, your lower part - legs -stretches down to try and root itself into the ground, your seat gets lighter and does not move accordingly with the horse anymore, 3 you begin to take contact with the mouth/nose, 4 you put a tension on the reins. That's how I did and soon the horse finds it more comfortable to listen to the voice and seat than wait for a more physical intervention. Now I put the voice in the 2nd position to try and improve our use of the seat/back/energy...



But what also helped us a great deal was to work on foot on that point.
     
    04-03-2011, 07:03 AM
  #5
Foal
I don't think It can be the saddle because we constantly check it to make sure it's comfortable, and we stretch her legs to make sure the girth is not pinching her. Also, she salivates with the bit, and I was told that is a good thing because it means they are comfortable with it.
As for the horses background ( sorry I forgot to include that )
She used to be ridden western style, and so people would just hop on her and make her go right away while they were still getting on her. I'm pretty sure that is probably the cause of her problem. I just can't get her out of the habit.
I use voice with her, but she will still respond with the elaborating stop. And when I use the reins, I make sure that I pull a little, and let go, then pull a little and let go so that I'm easy on her mouth and not too hard and not too gentle.
Also, she is kind of a fat horse and I don't think she wants to get the exercise lol.
     
    04-03-2011, 07:42 AM
  #6
Foal
For the salivating on the bit I'm not sure it always means the are comfortable, my horse once broke a bit in his mouth in the middle of a canter (thank God he responds perfectly to the "aaahoo stop"!), he was salivating with it since the beginning, and yet he broke it into two parts! Means he wasn't comfortable at all... And at the same time ha can salivate when I ride him bitless - which I have been doing for more than a year - just because he feels relaxed, but with nothing in his mouth... So salivating is not a sufficient clue, all alone.


Do you try to really reward her for each little effort on her part? She must feel that obeying is just wonderful, comfortable, a source of calm, pleasure etc.
     
    04-03-2011, 08:14 AM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equus caballus    
I don't think It can be the saddle because we constantly check it to make sure it's comfortable, and we stretch her legs to make sure the girth is not pinching her. Also, she salivates with the bit, and I was told that is a good thing because it means they are comfortable with it.
As for the horses background ( sorry I forgot to include that )
She used to be ridden western style, and so people would just hop on her and make her go right away while they were still getting on her. I'm pretty sure that is probably the cause of her problem. I just can't get her out of the habit.
I use voice with her, but she will still respond with the elaborating stop. And when I use the reins, I make sure that I pull a little, and let go, then pull a little and let go so that I'm easy on her mouth and not too hard and not too gentle.
Also, she is kind of a fat horse and I don't think she wants to get the exercise lol.
Is there any chance that her English saddle could need re-flocked? Wadded up padding in the panels can be a cause of pain and resistance.

In the OP you referred to changing her bit - what did you switch to? Salivating is a good thing, coupled with other signs of relaxation. Salivation along with a wringing tail, stiff posture, etc. can actually be a sign of stress and resistance. The ideal is an overall picture/feel of relaxation, with white foam "lipstick" on the horse's lips. This has as much (if not more) to do with the rider's hands than the bit.

How is her halt in-hand and on the lungeline? Does she stop promptly without pulling there? If not, that can be a good place to start.

Last "standard" thing to look at - your riding. If you are riding in a way that is not very well balanced, it will be harder for the horse to change direction, gait, speed, or balance nicely. Even if it is a purely behavioral/training problem, being solid and independent in your seat and able to help your mare balance can make a lot of difference in replacing that "gotta-go" habit.

I do recommend taking a few lessons if you can manage it - pics or video would help us to see what's going on and perhaps offer better advice, but in-person help can be invaluable.

Good luck!
     
    04-03-2011, 03:57 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephnello    
For the salivating on the bit I'm not sure it always means the are comfortable, my horse once broke a bit in his mouth in the middle of a canter (thank God he responds perfectly to the "aaahoo stop"!), he was salivating with it since the beginning, and yet he broke it into two parts! Means he wasn't comfortable at all... And at the same time ha can salivate when I ride him bitless - which I have been doing for more than a year - just because he feels relaxed, but with nothing in his mouth... So salivating is not a sufficient clue, all alone.


Do you try to really reward her for each little effort on her part? She must feel that obeying is just wonderful, comfortable, a source of calm, pleasure etc.
Yeah, I try to reward her with every part she does well, and I will pet her neck when she does something well, but I wish there was a way for her to really know that I'm happy with her when she does it correctly. If maybe I could get her to associate a sound or a touch with the way I reward her with carrots.
     
    04-03-2011, 04:05 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoutrider    
Is there any chance that her English saddle could need re-flocked? Wadded up padding in the panels can be a cause of pain and resistance.

In the OP you referred to changing her bit - what did you switch to? Salivating is a good thing, coupled with other signs of relaxation. Salivation along with a wringing tail, stiff posture, etc. can actually be a sign of stress and resistance. The ideal is an overall picture/feel of relaxation, with white foam "lipstick" on the horse's lips. This has as much (if not more) to do with the rider's hands than the bit.

How is her halt in-hand and on the lungeline? Does she stop promptly without pulling there? If not, that can be a good place to start.

Last "standard" thing to look at - your riding. If you are riding in a way that is not very well balanced, it will be harder for the horse to change direction, gait, speed, or balance nicely. Even if it is a purely behavioral/training problem, being solid and independent in your seat and able to help your mare balance can make a lot of difference in replacing that "gotta-go" habit.

I do recommend taking a few lessons if you can manage it - pics or video would help us to see what's going on and perhaps offer better advice, but in-person help can be invaluable.

Good luck!
The saddle is in nice condition and we switched from I think a snapple to a kimberwick or whatever it was called. I use the reins very gently with her new bit. The main purpose of the stronger bit is for emergency if she jumps into a gallop, because it's hard to stop her at that point. She is Much better at stopping during trot and walks. Sometimes they are elongated but sometimes they are right on command. And I sort of take lessons. They're are not with a professional but the person I work with at the farm guides me through and teaches me.
And the horse is usually always relaxed, her tail never flicks and her ears always flop relaxingly, and I'm always fair with the reins. So I'm pretty sure the salivating is a good sign. That's what Mrs. Pat told me too ( she is the one I work with at the farm that teaches me to ride )
I do think videos would be the best I can do, but it's hard to find the right match that would help with my problem. Red is actually I pretty good ride, I just want to perfect it.
     
    04-05-2011, 04:55 AM
  #10
Foal
I use the word "Croque" whenever I'm preparing to give a treat. There is the "C'est bien" or "ouiiii" for just a stroke, a massage, and immediately after that "Croque" announces some carott or "miel pops" (he just loves them...), after a few times he noticed if I don't say "Croque" there is nothing, I I don't even say "oui" or "c'est bien" there is absolutely no way to get some treat, but if I say "ouii" he knows a treat can maybe come, and the "Croque" helps him get the idea at the right moment. This way I can spend a few more seconds opening the little bag and taking the miel pops without him forgetting the movement that was right, because I said "croque" immediately after "ouiii", so he just waits patiently for the thing he knows will come. It does not only tells him what was good, but also learns him not to come and seek carotts on me or in my pockets, since without "Croque", no carott, it's clear.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Any tips to help me stop this? A knack for horses Horse Riding 5 12-23-2010 10:16 AM
Rearing on command Zab Horse Training 91 02-12-2009 08:18 PM
getting a horse to come using a command SonnyWimps Horse Training 12 07-26-2008 11:44 AM
Tips to Stop the Pumping! MysticRealm Horse Riding 6 03-06-2008 10:37 AM
Trotting withOUT command????? Help please!!!!!!! CameoStone5 Horse Training 2 07-29-2007 01:04 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0