UGHH my horse won't cooperate without Lulu!! - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

UGHH my horse won't cooperate without Lulu!!

This is a discussion on UGHH my horse won't cooperate without Lulu!! within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        12-25-2009, 06:05 PM
      #21
    Trained
    Just keep at it; he may not be running, just because you aren't taking Lulu...he may just be running because he can. Take Lu out of his paddock, and MAKE him run...if he wants to run away from you, then turn his game into yours. Bring a longe whip, carrot stick, or whatever, into his paddock, and when he goes to run away, flick that whip at his rear, and make him move off faster, and keep him going around the paddock for a good few minutes, then switch directions, and keep it going. After that, invite him to walk up, or start walking towards him (however you 'catch him'), and if he stands, fine, halter him, and that is that...if he goes to move away from you, then start the whole process over again, until he allows himself to be caught willingly.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        12-25-2009, 06:47 PM
      #22
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mom2pride    
    Just keep at it; he may not be running, just because you aren't taking Lulu...he may just be running because he can. Take Lu out of his paddock, and MAKE him run...if he wants to run away from you, then turn his game into yours. Bring a longe whip, carrot stick, or whatever, into his paddock, and when he goes to run away, flick that whip at his rear, and make him move off faster, and keep him going around the paddock for a good few minutes, then switch directions, and keep it going. After that, invite him to walk up, or start walking towards him (however you 'catch him'), and if he stands, fine, halter him, and that is that...if he goes to move away from you, then start the whole process over again, until he allows himself to be caught willingly.
    Okay, I'll try that. When I take Lulu out of the pasture first, I can barely keep him from barging out of the gate and coming after her....
         
        01-08-2010, 07:13 PM
      #23
    Showing
    I tried the turning-him-around-whenever-he-speeds-up-thing on the way home from a trail ride the other day, but it didn't work. He has a one-track mind when it comes to any separation between the two of them....and I also ran into problems on a separate ride through the back pastures when he reared on me when I was circling him and we were going in the direction of the barn. He was frustrated at being held back, threw up his head, and half-reared.....I got him back on all fours before he was a foot in the air and managed to stay on bareback, but I gotta say I was annoyed he would resort to rearing.
         
        01-09-2010, 10:56 AM
      #24
    Trained
    Do you have a safe area to practice this stuff? You really need to start out close to home/Lulu and move away gradually to minimize the danger to yourself. Or get somebody else to come out and work him through it. Somebody who has dealt with this kind of thing would be best.
         
        01-09-2010, 12:50 PM
      #25
    Showing
    I've been practicing around the yard with him, preparing for trail class, and he's okay with that. We rode just around the barn and outside the surrounding pasture. After a few practices there I switched to riding him in the back pastures, which were about the same distance from the barn as we were when we rode around the barn, but there were woods between us and the barn and that's when he really freaks
         
        01-13-2010, 10:29 PM
      #26
    Trained
    Start carrying a halter and lungeline with you; and when he starts misbehaving badly enough that it scares you (ie the rearing) then get off, and lunge him...either way, he works his tail off for trying to get back to the barn before you are ready. You may have to use a saddle on him, so you can easily get back on. When you've lunged him for a bit, get back on, and try again; go back away from home a few steps then turn around, and go back toward home...if he's calm pat him and tell him he's a good boy.

    One thing you need to stop doing is holding him back...he needs to learn to rate his pace, regardless of whether he's going to or from home. When he speeds up, you put him to work. When he's going the pace you want, you leave him be.
         
        01-14-2010, 08:43 AM
      #27
    Trained
    ^^agreed, as soon as he speeds up you turn his a** around and put him to work. He'll figure it out really quickly if you're firm about it.

    Search some threads on rearing and you'll find quite a few good suggestions. I had a thread "Naughty Rearing Horse" and I think it was Koomy had a really good suggestion that worked wonders (in addition to groundwork and such). I understand what mom2pride is suggestioning, but I don't really like getting off a horse who is misbehaving. In my experience that start to learn that rearing/misbehaving = end of ride. I worry that he'll start to rear in an effort to get you off. But you may be able to mitigate that with working him on the ground.
         
        01-14-2010, 11:12 PM
      #28
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MN Tigerstripes    
    ^^agreed, as soon as he speeds up you turn his a** around and put him to work. He'll figure it out really quickly if you're firm about it.

    Search some threads on rearing and you'll find quite a few good suggestions. I had a thread "Naughty Rearing Horse" and I think it was Koomy had a really good suggestion that worked wonders (in addition to groundwork and such). I understand what mom2pride is suggestioning, but I don't really like getting off a horse who is misbehaving. In my experience that start to learn that rearing/misbehaving = end of ride. I worry that he'll start to rear in an effort to get you off. But you may be able to mitigate that with working him on the ground.
    I hear where you are coming from on getting off, but see, here's where it's different than simply 'getting off and walking home'...the horse is still not getting home when he wants, and he is still getting his tail worked hard. I never tell an owner they "have" to stay on a horse to work through an issue like this, because if the horse does resort to rearing (which is far more dangerous than bucking), many riders just aren't that confident to stick with it, so I would rather them be able to get off and still be able to work the horse really hard, AND be safe while working it, than to try and ride it out, and possibly get hurt in the process. I have even had to employ this method a time or two on a few spoiled rotten jerks. It does work, mainly because the horse still isn't getting back to the barn 'at the time he wants to'.
         
        01-15-2010, 08:02 AM
      #29
    Trained
    That's a good point and it probably is the safer choice of the two. In reality it's probably the better option for this particular situation.

    However, I still think she should practice ways of managing rears while in the saddle. It never hurts to be prepared. But this is something to practice A LOT before you put your horse in a situation where he may rear. The way Koomy explained it was as SOON as you feel them bunching up you disengage the hindquarters.

    Here is her reply
    "Gain control of his hind quarters. Teach him in an area where he behaves to move his butt from right to left when you ask. Right reins comes up (towards the sky) right leg bumps his hind end to the left. Release instantly. Repeat both directions until you can easily move his hind end from the left to the right. Holding the rein striahgt upwards gives you control over his shoulders , and it directly speaks to the hind. If you were to pull the rein away or towards your hip you open the door for his shoulder to buldge out, in which case gives him the ability to drift around with his shoulder leading.
    Moving his hind end left to right transfers the weight onto his front end. When his weight is on his front end, he cannot rear. If his weight is on his hind legs, he has the ability to rear. The second you feel your guy posture backwards and go there, you instantly move his hind end from left to right, right to left, quickly. If you are too slow, he'll sneak out and get that weight behind him to rear. The moment you feel him want to just go forwards, you allow.
    Practice this somewhere safe before you hit the trail. :) "
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    UGHH! Please read. *rant* DixiesPaintedNova Horse Talk 11 12-13-2009 04:10 PM
    Joey, Percy, and Lulu Joshie General Off Topic Discussion 3 03-20-2009 09:47 PM
    Ughh SMyers Horse Talk 2 09-22-2008 06:35 PM
    Crazy Lulu blossom856 Horse Talk 1 12-08-2007 04:43 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:10 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0