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Using the reins to correct a horse?

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    05-31-2012, 12:22 PM
  #11
Weanling
You were in a rush and took the short cut way out. You could have told your friends to continue on and taken the opportunity to work with your horse, and then caught up in a few minutes.

Next time, if he won't move away from the trailer, dismount and see if you can get him moving from the ground, lunge him in circles and send him away from the trailer.

Or if you refuse to dismount, flex him. Bring his nose, kindly, to your knee. Flex him, left side, right side, left side, right side, back and forth. After a few repetitions, start his feet moving while you flex. Ask him to engage his hind end and yield his butt away when you bring his nose to your knee. If he doesn't want to leave the trailer, you make him work at the trailer, and relax off of him when he moves away. It's pressure release, and much more effective for both of you instead of painful punishment of his mouth.

If you need a punishment, open hand smack to the neck, shoulder, or rump will work. Or if you have long reins, a lead line, or crop. Don't whip him, but give him a good smack. Personally, I only resort to a spank or smack when they misbehave, like throwing a crow hop, buck, cow kick in response to a request. Refusing to move forward isn't necessarily misbehavior or deserving of punishment.
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    05-31-2012, 12:43 PM
  #12
Yearling
I do this if theres no other way my QH you can't use anything on him like a bat/whip/spurs. So theres no other choice. If he rears he gets a little bump if he's acting up that nothing else works he gets another. My paint I use a whip in his sensitive area because it gets his attention back to me (gets too distracted) and he knows its time to work I do it once to twice everytime I ride and it works very well! My moms horse if you whip him you get a rocket and if you spur him he knows to go faster. So he will get bumped a bit.

I really don't care what people think every horse is different and works better with different things. You don't know how my horses were trained..
     
    05-31-2012, 12:59 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joidigm    
Refusing to move forward isn't necessarily misbehavior or deserving of punishment.

After receiving a cue to move forward and the horse objects.... That is misbehavior imo. You can't let a horse choose everything they do.
     
    05-31-2012, 01:01 PM
  #14
Weanling
Giving a bit bump or tug on a rearing horse is a dangerous situation, because you will never know if they decide to back down, or escalate and flip over because you pulled to hard. That is something severely recommended against in most cases.

And there is a difference between a half halt and an unnecessarily harsh tug of the bit when trying to slow a horses gait down.
     
    05-31-2012, 01:01 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joidigm    
Bring his nose, kindly, to your knee. Flex him, left side, right side, left side, right side, back and forth. After a few repetitions, start his feet moving while you flex. Ask him to engage his hind end and yield his butt away when you bring his nose to your knee. If he doesn't want to leave the trailer, you make him work at the trailer, and relax off of him when he moves away. It's pressure release, and much more effective for both of you instead of painful punishment of his mouth.
I've done something like this before and it definitely worked. She was refusing to move forward onto a tarp (we were just starting to introduce it), she would plant her hooves in front of it and even back up. So I started working her in small circles near it, getting closer and closer, until she had a hoof on it for a second, then two, and eventually I let her off the circle and she walked straight over it. After that, she realized there was nothing to fear and now she just plays with tarps when she sees them


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joidigm    
If you need a punishment, open hand smack to the neck, shoulder, or rump will work. Or if you have long reins, a lead line, or crop. Don't whip him, but give him a good smack. Personally, I only resort to a spank or smack when they misbehave, like throwing a crow hop, buck, cow kick in response to a request. Refusing to move forward isn't necessarily misbehavior or deserving of punishment.
I respectfully disagree about this one...to me, if I'm asking her to move forward and she's deliberately disobeying my legs (given I'm not asking anything of her that she can't handle/not putting her in any danger), that's misbehaving and she WILL get poked with my spurs, smacked with a crop behind my leg or on the rump, etc. until she listens to me. You start to develop some bad habits when you let a horse just decide that it's ok not to listen. My horse NEVER rears or bucks, but by not going forward that IS her way of misbehaving
     
    05-31-2012, 01:05 PM
  #16
Weanling
Refusing to move forward is not necessarily deserving of punishment. I will stand by that statement. Refusal is not always as simple as not obeying. It is up to the rider to decide when it is or isn't. There is a difference between a horse fearing going forward, and out right refusing to go forward. Fear shouldn't be punished, but worked with.

Edit/Add: And you can't always say that because you know you aren't making them do something they are incapable of, doesn't mean they don't fear doing something. A horse can go down a trail perfectly safe, yes. A new trail, or an uncommonly visited trail, or even something as just the change in scenery (hey that bush looks different!) doesn't mean it isn't something they are afraid of. I have considered many horses irrationally fearful, but it isn't up to me to decide it is something my horse shouldn't be afraid of. I have to show my horse that it is something to not be afraid of, and then the horse has to decide to not be afraid.
     
    05-31-2012, 01:07 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Fearing and "refusing" are 99.9% of the time the same thing to a horse, IMO.
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    05-31-2012, 01:14 PM
  #18
Weanling
I disagree that they are the same. It is something that should be recognized, and then dealt with accordingly. Punishment shouldn't be automatic for it.
     
    05-31-2012, 03:59 PM
  #19
Yearling
Prepare to be slightly detoured by some good ol' ramblin'.
When I first got my gelding and we were still working out the "who's the boss? I'm the boss" deal, he liked to do stuff like randomly stop and refuse to go just to test how far I would let him take it... lol. He's only done that once out of fear or concern, and let me tell you, the second I saw Gerri-bopper tensed, I was on the lookout and taking my little sister home. There was a group of illegal men walking right through the desert heading for us, and without Gerronimo, we'd have never know until they were right there.
Needless to say, some horses are just doing it to get your goat. On the other hand, my friend's little arabian was like a scared little bunny on the trail, lol- he would truly be too afraid to move sometimes... He's a very timid, submissive horse while Gerronimo had all the horses in our herd whipped the minute he pranced his chubby butt into the pen, so I think dealing with this kind of problem has a lot to do with the horse- if your horse is a dominant type, there's more of a chance of them just pushing your buttons, and you may need to be stricter, but if the horse is more of a timid one, you should approach the problem in a much more soothing way.
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    05-31-2012, 06:04 PM
  #20
Showing
Had your friends continued riding away he'd have likely wanted to catch up. In a horse's mind, if he's way behind the others he could easily become dinner so there's considerable incentive for him to catch up.
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