wanted advice on bolting - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

wanted advice on bolting

This is a discussion on wanted advice on bolting within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • My green broken horse bolts
  • How to bridge the reins

Like Tree16Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-25-2012, 02:19 PM
  #11
Trained
All horses will eventually run out of gas. The most important thing is to keep them from running into things or tripping on stuff. I have on friend that almost died from doing an "emergency dismount" from a panicked, bolting horse. She broke her skull and was in a coma for a month. If she had not tried to get off, she would have been fine. I may fall off of a fear crazed horse. (Actually, I did that recently. Ouch.) I will never intentionally jump off unless I am in Utah going straight toward the edge of a cliff and I am absolutely sure that the horse is going over the edge of a mile deep canyon and I am not wearing a parachute.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-25-2012, 10:01 PM
  #12
uii
Foal
When your horse bolts, tighten your reins, and yank really hard on them repeatedly. It might seem mean, but it throws them off, and then they remember they have a rider on their back! It really works. You could also try turning them in a circle. Good luck!
     
    03-25-2012, 10:32 PM
  #13
Trained
Uii-all due respect, but you cannot out-yank a 1000# horse. Yanking alone will NOT stop a bolt.
boldstart and BCtazzie like this.
     
    03-25-2012, 11:35 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Just like there are many things for a horse to spook at, there are just as many opinions on what to do. I agree that if the horse is truly bolting, there's not much you can do except hold on or bail off (not recommended).

Instead of waiting for it to happen and then respond or react, work with the horse on the ground to look to you for guidance and assurance. You can't desensitize the horse to everything that could ever spook them but you can teach them that they don't need to bolt when they encounter something new. To do this you'll need to find a trainer or experienced person to help you one on one.

If you feel that there is an opportunity that your horse will spook, give them something to do or a job to keep their mind occupied and their focus on you. I wouldn't have them just stop and wait for it to pass. I would keep them moving forward and concentrating on what I ask of them. I don't have a problem with having them check a stationary and safe object out. Some think that it just reinforces their instinct to be scared of things and you should have them just learn to ignore objects. I think if you keep them facing the object until they relax, they learn to not be scared of things and be more curious of things. But that's just my opinion.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    03-26-2012, 12:36 AM
  #15
Weanling
I agree with Faye about true bolters, thankfully, I don't think there are very many true bolters out there.

I also agree with Boldstart. Bridge your reins, hold your hands along side your horse's neck by his mane and give squeezes on the reins every few seconds, like squeezing out a sponge. If the horse has really set his jaw against you alternate your squeezes left then right rather than at the same time, steer your horse as best you can by looking to were you want to go, by looking to where you want to go your body should give your horse the right signals as well, so stay focused to were you want to go, be determined.

Think also that this is a resisting strong elastic feeling on the reins and don't lock your elbows, the horse will be pulling against himself, do not pull the reins back or back and up at all. You will only upset your own balance by doing so. Also do not lean forward or back, stay centred over your horse and think of becoming very bottom heavy, letting all of your weight sink straight down to the ground. Also, be very aware of your breathing, stay calm and breathe deeply and calmly and be aware of not tensing up anywhere in your body. Yes, this seems like a lot to think about and maybe sounds a bit weird, but it really works, the more aware you are of your own body and how to control your own body the better you will be able to control your horse and get him back under control.

I also would never suggest bailing off, unless your life really depends on it, like I think someone mentioned, going over a cliff as an example.

Also, spend lots of time in the saddle working on developing a good seat and secure position. Also, it is a good idea to work on your fitness out of the saddle, especially core strength. You will be able to stay in control better if something really were to happen.
boldstart and ChemE like this.
     
    03-26-2012, 01:29 AM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by uii    
When your horse bolts, tighten your reins, and yank really hard on them repeatedly. It might seem mean, but it throws them off, and then they remember they have a rider on their back! It really works. You could also try turning them in a circle. Good luck!
Go try that on a racehorse and see where you end up.
Susan Crumrine likes this.
     
    03-26-2012, 02:24 AM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Bridge your reins,
anyone have a photo of this? I'm not sure what this means.
     
    03-26-2012, 02:32 AM
  #18
Foal
How To Ride A Thoroughbred Racehorse | Training Thoroughbreds

Good article about riding racehorses including how to bridge your reins.
     
    03-26-2012, 03:31 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Having ridden true bolters, ex race horses and ponies who often decided to b*gger off up hills at the gallop I never found that bridging my reins helped at all.
I prefer to get thier head round to my knee as quick as possible. I've yet to meet a horse that can continue to gallop with their head at that angle. Mind you with a true bolter there is no way you are getting thier head round and often it is safer just to bail off. If you have learnt how to fall correctly then it is the far safer option as a true bolter will injure themselves and go through fencing etc well before they stop. Mine cracked his skull on a wall because he galloped head first into it. He would not have cared if it had been a barbed wire fence or a 100ft cliff, he was blind to it.
     
    03-26-2012, 05:59 AM
  #20
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
Having ridden true bolters, ex race horses and ponies who often decided to b*gger off up hills at the gallop I never found that bridging my reins helped at all.
I prefer to get thier head round to my knee as quick as possible. I've yet to meet a horse that can continue to gallop with their head at that angle. Mind you with a true bolter there is no way you are getting thier head round and often it is safer just to bail off. If you have learnt how to fall correctly then it is the far safer option as a true bolter will injure themselves and go through fencing etc well before they stop. Mine cracked his skull on a wall because he galloped head first into it. He would not have cared if it had been a barbed wire fence or a 100ft cliff, he was blind to it.
And once you pull that head right round to your knee, where is all that weight and momentum going to go?

How is that deemed safe to have a horse bolting at a gallop and them forcing them to stop by unbalancing them?
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
farriers advice wanted... kait18 Hoof Care 4 11-22-2011 12:28 PM
Wanted:Some first horse shopping advice. TheQuietGirl Horses for Sale 6 08-01-2011 08:56 AM
Healing critique/advice wanted Eliz Horse Health 5 06-15-2011 12:50 AM
Calling all parents advice wanted Plains Drifter General Off Topic Discussion 16 03-04-2010 12:33 AM
Stopping a bolting horse...advice anyone? Bia English Riding 38 07-13-2009 01:25 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0