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What to do after a horse bucks?

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  • What to do if a horse bucks
  • Forum horse buck buster

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    05-29-2013, 11:02 PM
  #11
Trained
My big girl doesn't bunny buck when she bucks. They're HUGE. She's only gotten me off once but in my eyes once is too many times. She's always genuinely terrified when she does have a go at it but she's in the process of learning that bucking is unacceptable under ANY circumstance. [edit; she's very green, too - 2 1/2 and with under 30 rides. Some bucking is pretty normal with most greenies, especially if they didn't buck during the breaking process]

Simply put, you haul their head up, push them forward, and ride them through it. If you have to, bridge your reins, because then the horse is only fighting against itself for head down.

The best way of stopping the buck is to feel it coming and bridge your reins BEFORE the horse can get its head down. Keeping the head up removes all the power out of the buck [not that a bunny buck HAS any power!] and then it becomes much easier to ride out.

One of the girls I ride with has a pony that bucks her off with monotonous regularity... someone really needs to teach her how to handle it when he does buck or he's never going to stop...
     
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    05-29-2013, 11:58 PM
  #12
Foal
Bridging of the reins won't stop a horse getting its head down and pretty much will do nothing against a bucker except help you keep your hands low and even. It's a method used in horse racing so the horse can't pull on the rider. Note it doesn't even stop the horse pulling only saves the riders arms.
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    05-30-2013, 12:12 AM
  #13
Banned
I don't mean to 'call' anyone-- but I've been on several horses that would buck with their head pulled up, lol.

I Know I do it the less desirable way but- when a horse bucks me ill kick them to let em buck it out- why? Because I want them to know their little tantrum did nothin but make them work harder doin what they thought would put an end to things. Never let them think theyve gained anything by bucking and it wont be a problematic habit.

Horses that use the excuse of spookin to buck do lots of work too.. im not easily fooled, lol.
     
    05-30-2013, 12:18 AM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by toto    
I don't mean to 'call' anyone-- but I've been on several horses that would buck with their head pulled up, lol.

I Know I do it the less desirable way but- when a horse bucks me ill kick them to let em buck it out- why? Because I want them to know their little tantrum did nothin but make them work harder doin what they thought would put an end to things. Never let them think theyve gained anything by bucking and it wont be a problematic habit.

Horses that use the excuse of spookin to buck do lots of work too.. im not easily fooled, lol.
If the head is up its a pigroot. If the head is down its a buck. Some horses can do massive pigroots though hence why a lot of people will call it a buck.
Also depends on the legs too, if all four leave the ground, or the horse does the seesaw motion, then yeah it's a buck.
     
    05-30-2013, 12:29 AM
  #15
Green Broke
For me it depends on the reason of the buck.
In the OP's case it sounds like a "feel good" jump. Having fun running up a hill and some wind in the ears. I would probably spank his bottom and make him do something a little more strenuous to get the point across that it wasn't acceptable.

On a horse more serious about bucking but still feeling good I would hold up a rein to tip the nose and keep the head up and run his ass off if the ground permits. A horse still might try to get something done but it's hard to get any power in the buck with a hollow back and staring at the moon. If the ground is bad it would be ideal to feel it before it starts and bend him around much like I would do with one that is cold backed to talk him out of it. Beware of the switch of directions, they will try to sneak one off then. The switch in directions needs to be quick yet smooth as not to snatch at him or allow him time to get straight.
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    05-30-2013, 12:33 AM
  #16
Yearling
Can someone explain to me what "bridging the reins" means? I've never heard that expression before.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-30-2013, 01:33 AM
  #17
Trained
Here you go a link horse back riding | EQUINE Ink | Page 5 explains it better than I can
     
    05-30-2013, 01:48 AM
  #18
Trained
It really depends on what kind of buck you are dealing with... With a buck after a slip or something, I wouldn't worry about it too much, but as a rider, you should be able to feel these things coming and already have your hands up to get the head up before he has a chance to get his bum up.
That's how I tell a really good rider - not if they can sit a buck, but if they can prevent a buck. Sometimes a rodeo is going to happen anyways, but if the horse is a bit hot and a rider can ride tactfully and with good timing through it, it's far easier than dealing with a buck.

With a horse who is "feel good" bucking, I kick their little butts into high gear. Like move it buster!! That's not allowed :P

With a horse who is bucking at an aid, like the changes, or something, you have to be quick enough again to prevent the buck, and whatever comes after it. In the changes it's usually a buck and then a bolt - so when they buck you half halt them forcefully onto their hineys and keep the aid for the change on. Eventually they figure out that bucking gets them in trouble AND the aid doesn't go away.

However, if you don't have the timing for these things, I would really highly recommend getting someone on the horse who does. A poorly timed correction is worse than no correction and as was pointed out, can actually make the issue worse.
Good luck!
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    05-30-2013, 06:05 AM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by GamingGrrl    
Can someone explain to me what "bridging the reins" means? I've never heard that expression before.
Posted via Mobile Device
It's the way all jockeys and trackwork riders hold the reins. Basically you have one rein, take the other and cross it over the top forming a 'bridge' so you should then be holding both reins together in both hands horizontally.

When you form the initial rein cross you pull the section of rein that's forming a loop to tighten the bridge then you place each hand into the the groove of the horses neck, where the neck meets the shoulder. A simple twist of the wrist will slow the horse up, put pressure on its mouth as opposed to pulling back on the reins. When the jockey does have to pull back its an entire body motion, if in the correct position the body is used as an anchor and no pressure should be felt in the arms at anytime. If you can feel any your bridge is wrong.

It's very complicated and you would need someone in racing to show you how to correctly do it. An incorrect bridge will do nothing and sadly most people will just cross the reins over and think they know how to do one properly. And even if you can do one correctly without knowing how to correctly use your body with it all it will do is save your arms, won't stop the horse from doing anything etc.
     
    05-30-2013, 04:59 PM
  #20
Weanling
Cool

Well I had another ride today, up the hill again and everything went well. But when I went up the hill one more time, I felt him tense up and put his head down to do a buck and I quickly pulled his head back up, made him speed up and YES! He didn't even get to buck! I rode down the hill again and back up, no problems! It was just going to be a TINY buck, but I made sure that he didn't even do THAT, just in case he will reme,her that it's ok.
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