What kind of riding is easiest? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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What kind of riding is easiest?

Hey everyone im a beginner and im just wondering what kind of riding would be easiest for me too learn? And also i cant remember wether it goes from walking the horse to cantering etc... Any help would be much appreciated c: cheers thanks heaps! =D
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post #2 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:33 AM
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No kind of riding will be any easier than another. They are all different kinds of difficult.
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post #3 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:36 AM
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There is no easier way. You have to start with the basics and all disciplines have the basics.....balance, collection, proper use of aids, getting your seat.....etc. There is a lot to list. I learned hunt seat many years ago and even though I now ride western, I still post!
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post #4 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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Ohk.. What kind is your favourite... And then what would be the funnest?
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post #5 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
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What is hunt seat? And what do you do after learning to walk on a horse is it cantering or?? Then whats after that etc?
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post #6 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:49 AM
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No discipline is easiest if done properly. Learning to ride properly is hard work, regardless of whether you're doing Western or English disciplines.

The transitions in English disciplines are walk, trot, canter. In Western they're walk, trot, lope.

What will be the most fun for you to learn will be the disciplines in which you're most interested.

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post #7 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 10:53 AM
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It's all going to end up as personal preference. Every rider likes something and heck even horses like something. Try to boil it down to the simple decision: English or Western.

Once you pick a primary style it will be easier for you to select a discipline and once you've got a good seat you can branch out.

For example, I ride English, mostly Dressage but I do a bit of jumping, obstacle course, trail riding and am looking into working equitation and mounted games.
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post #8 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 11:15 AM
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Welcome to the wonderful world of horses :)
When you first start riding you'll essentially be picking between two 'styles' then, once you develop the core understanding you'll be able to follow through in that style into a more precise discipline.
There's English and Western. For the core basics of riding the differences are your seat, in traditional western they have more of a chair seat (sitting more on your back pockets with your legs a little more out in front of you), you neck rein to steer, you typically do not post the trot (though it can be a good skill to learn and many modern Western riders do post for comfort's sake). English riding you typically have a more balanced or forward seat, sitting with shoulder, hip, heel all in line. You'll steer using direct reining (pulling left or right to turn) and you'll typically post the trot.

Once you've learned the basics of whichever style you're most interested in you can develop those skills into a more precise discipline.
English:
-Hunter/jumper
-Cross country
-Dressage
-Eventing
Western:
-numerous cattle working sports
-barrel racing

There's a whole bunch more in both of those styles but I don't think I could go into them all :P You could try taking the basics in both styles and deciding which fits you more.

Good luck! Have fun!
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post #9 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PunksTank View Post
You'll steer using direct reining (pulling left or right to turn).
No, that's not correct. Direct reining is for giving cues to the horse, not for 'steering'. You turn a horse with your seat and legs, and emphasize what you're asking with cues from the reins. Anyone who would use their reins for 'steering' a horse right or left is doing it incorrectly.

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post #10 of 23 Old 12-17-2012, 11:23 AM Thread Starter
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Well the other day i got into a trot on a tb and that was in a stock saddle so what that be in english or western discipline or none lol... I feel like a complete idiot but i guess i have to ask questions too learn things hay! Im liking the sounds of english but i have a weak left knee ankle and foot so im stuffed there... So yehh....
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