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why did you start riding english?

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        10-19-2012, 07:09 PM
      #61
    Foal
    'Why did you start riding English?' was the title of the thread and I answered it. If I spent all of my time being concerned about offending a few people, I'd never get anything done. If your skin is so thin that you took offense to my VERY general opinion, then perhaps you should seek some professional help as to why people on the internet hurt your feelings.
         
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        10-19-2012, 07:14 PM
      #62
    Trained
    Lol, OTTB, Bless your heart, how does that attitude usually work for you? I tend to think that if one person is upset, they are thin skinned, if many are, then maybe it is something I said, YMMV
         
        10-19-2012, 07:40 PM
      #63
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OTTB    
    'Why did you start riding English?' was the title of the thread and I answered it.
    Nope, you made a bunch of ignorant and uninformed generalizations based on no actual real experience.

    You could have easily left off all the sneering and holding your nose in the air, and answered the question without acting as if you're far superior to people who choose to ride different disciplines.

    Why do all the people who act like flaming rudesters claim it's someone elses problem when they come off as the southbound end of a northbound donkey?
         
        10-19-2012, 07:47 PM
      #64
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SouthernTrailsGA    
    Well it seems you have missed the joys of taking a 5 day camping trek on a Horse.

    I do not ride English, so excuse my ignorance, but can you do that in an English Saddle?

    .
    Yup, you can. Take a week-long "horse-trekking" vacation in Norway or Iceland (highly recommended, BTW), crossing rough, spectacular wilderness, and you will be in an English saddle. Though in fairness, the gear is not carried on your own horse/saddle.

    I think a skilled rider can pretty much do the things they enjoy doing in either discipline (well, except you might not want to do too much high jumping in a Western saddle or rope calves in an English). English or Western: Communicate with your horse. Be balanced. Have a good seat. Enjoy the ride. Enjoy your partnership with your horse. Enjoy the sights and smells. That's what it's about.

    My family learned to ride from an officer in the Norwegian cavalry. When we emigrated to the US, he visited us: 75 years old, weathered, leathery, sinewy, crotchety. He showed up at SeaTac Intl. In his jodhpurs and tall riding boots (They were the only clothes I ever saw him in). It took less than a day for his infamous comment: "Americans can't ride" (referring to Western riding). So we drove him out to the Pendleton Roundup for giggles. We expected him to be proud and stonefaced and in denial. He had the time of his life. In the car on the way home, I remember him smiling and clapping, then suddenly exclaimed "Americans (Western) CAN ride!", and took a Western saddle home with him as hand-luggage.
         
        10-19-2012, 09:20 PM
      #65
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
    MH, I have come off a bucking horse (thankfully he stopped and stood stock still!) and had my foot stuck in a stirrup. Landed on my other foot but was stuck for a good second! Ever since, I prefer to ride a bucking horse without stirrups, tyvm... and my current horse doesn't stop when you come off so if it happened with HIM, I would be dragged. And probably stepped on.

    I can actually ride out a bigger bucking fit bareback or stirrupless than I can with them - from experience the ONLY time current horse has bucked me off was when he decided to throw in 3 or 4 good ones at riding club (in a flat lesson :/ made me look a right idiot of course) and I was just gone. The other day I was bareback and rode a big one in a canter transition without even moving, and a couple of months ago I was stirrupless (dressage saddle, so same saddle as the one time he's actually bucked me off) and asked him to canter, he threw in a big one and bolted, bucking every 1-2 strides. Would have stuck on 6 or 7 without being in any danger of coming off before he quit bucking and I could turn him in a circle and slow him up. Haven't had to ride out a REAL bronc-fest though.

    I think it's because I had a pony that bucked something dreadful, never big but for some reason always horribly unseating, that I rode, for 3 months straight, bareback, because I didn't have and couldn't afford a saddle that would fit him. Had him 2 years then outgrew him and sold him to a little girl who adores him - and not a crow-hop in sight.

    You'd think after all that I would trust Monty a bit more not to throw things at me I can't handle, or myself a bit more to handle what he throws at me, but nooo.
    Hey there! You mentioned that your horse doesn't stop when you come off. Here's a trick to teach him, the Arabs train their horses in the desert to do this, because if their horse runs off.....they're dead! You have to actually have mock fall offs to train this, but it's real handy. Tie a string to your horses bit, fall off and hang on! Say whoa.......horse learns to stop when you fall off......they only learn if you teach em, and when you're in a real bucking party the last thing you're thinking about is the horse running off.....I've never done this, but I might try if I feel brave enough to dive off my horse until he learns it....hope he's a fast learner......
         
        10-19-2012, 09:28 PM
      #66
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OTTB    
    Western sports do not attract me in the least. I have zero interest in racing around barrels or chasing down calves. I'm also highly annoyed at this new thing called 'Western Dressage' where someone is giving obvious cues and moving around in the saddle so much a toddler could see it. To me, a Western saddle is good for one thing - ranching. Anything else is just kind of boring to me.

    English always struck me as more in depth, requiring more skill, and no handy horn to grab onto when you're in trouble. I had this opinion before I started riding and had no real exposure to the horse world. My information was from books, magazines, and what I saw on TV.

    Now that I ride, I've used a Western saddle and can feel the difference between it, and even a cheap GP. In a GP I am required to pay attention to my balance. In a Western I can cheat and just sit there and grab onto something. In a GP I can jump without being stabbed in the gut by a horn. In a GP I can do training level dressage moves without having to swing bulky leather around so that my foot is in the proper position. I feel more connected to the horse, instead of feeling like I'm sitting in a chair with my feet planted on the ground.
    Hahaha! Your comments on saddles is laughable. Get your butt on a high level reining horse in a high end slick seat reining saddle, ride a sliding stop and a spin with no contact on your horses face and no touching the saddle, it's horn or the horse and come back and talk about it.

    Actually I'd like to see you on a cutting horse in your English saddle......

    (BY THE WAY I grew up riding English - so I'm not ignorant to it)
         
        10-19-2012, 11:53 PM
      #67
    Weanling
    It was more comfortable for me! I have a dislocating hip and dressage made my hips stronger so they wouldn't pop out of place or click all the time!

    Not too mention the saddles are typically less bulky so it didn't put so much pressure on it.
         
        10-21-2012, 04:32 AM
      #68
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
    Hey there! You mentioned that your horse doesn't stop when you come off. Here's a trick to teach him, the Arabs train their horses in the desert to do this, because if their horse runs off.....they're dead! You have to actually have mock fall offs to train this, but it's real handy. Tie a string to your horses bit, fall off and hang on! Say whoa.......horse learns to stop when you fall off......they only learn if you teach em, and when you're in a real bucking party the last thing you're thinking about is the horse running off.....I've never done this, but I might try if I feel brave enough to dive off my horse until he learns it....hope he's a fast learner......
    Hi :)

    Well... he does NOW, because I put in a heap of training doing pretty much what you're talking about, except landing on my feet. Started at a walk, dropped my stirrups, leaned forward, and swung off. Stayed at a walk until he stopped every time, then moved up to a trot, and then canter. I can leap off at full gallop now and he'll stop every time.

    What he doesn't do, is stop when he's in the middle of a bucking fit, but I think that's because he's an honest horse so if he's bucking he's doing it because he's hurting. The one time he got me off, best we can determine he'd been stung by a bee. He was still bucking when I got to my feet (was winded so that took a bit). His other bucking fits, either his saddle has been a bit tight, or his loins have been sore.
         
        10-22-2012, 12:28 AM
      #69
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
    Hi :)

    Well... he does NOW, because I put in a heap of training doing pretty much what you're talking about, except landing on my feet. Started at a walk, dropped my stirrups, leaned forward, and swung off. Stayed at a walk until he stopped every time, then moved up to a trot, and then canter. I can leap off at full gallop now and he'll stop every time.

    What he doesn't do, is stop when he's in the middle of a bucking fit, but I think that's because he's an honest horse so if he's bucking he's doing it because he's hurting. The one time he got me off, best we can determine he'd been stung by a bee. He was still bucking when I got to my feet (was winded so that took a bit). His other bucking fits, either his saddle has been a bit tight, or his loins have been sore.
    Haha! Well that's perfect isn't it! Yes I must start jumping off my guy randomly to see what he will do!! He's so darn broke he will probably sense my shift and stop and politely wait for me to get off!!! Perhaps I need to let a few angry bees loose in the arena???
         
        10-22-2012, 10:31 AM
      #70
    Trained
    You should! Starting at walk of course. They learn very quickly that dropping your stirrups means halt. Mine is very very lazy so it suited him just fine!

    The one thing I can't do any more is stirrupless work because if I drop my stirrups he stops. I have to ride with stirrups, or bareback, or fight with him because he thinks he's supposed to be standing still.

    I have absolutely no interest in letting angry bees loose - I would get stung too!
         

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