Why do I feel so clueless? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Why do I feel so clueless?

This is a discussion on Why do I feel so clueless? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    Like Tree44Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-12-2014, 10:28 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    That trainer may not want to see anyone ride the horse successfully, cause it would hurt her business (maybe she though you would take her students?)

    Or, the trainer may not be very experienced, and thinks that the only reason a horse drops it's head is to buck or rip the reins out of the riders hands and bolt. I mean, that trainer may have totallly mis-interpreted what she was seeing when you were riding. She may have honestly been worried for your safety, and become anxious.

    Which may be the whole problem with the current owner, if she is being taught to overreact and "correct" the horse just when he is getting soft, that could really be messing with the horse's brain and the confusing messages he is getting is causing him to bolt.

    Just try not to take it personally, cause it sounds like they are the ones with the issues
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-12-2014, 11:18 PM
      #12
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
    Maybe this trainer is being melodramatic. If she couldn't teach a rider to not let her horse bolt off in 2 years, maybe she just didn't want me accomplishing anything without her input and in front of a group of people who board there.
    I'd lay odds that this is probably pretty close to accurate. She's not much of a trainer if she's been trying (and failing) to correct a bolting issue for 2 years .

    Just going from what you've said, I likely would never let her handle one of my horses.
         
        02-13-2014, 08:53 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    The lady is 58, and years ago she competed with jumping all over the country. Since that time, has most likely given lessons and trained horses. I wonder when her last lesson was. I'm not an instructor so I'm not trying to take over anything.

    I think the bolting has developed over the past year or so.
    I think with her 40 plus years of experience, she should know what softening a horse looks like. She said that you don't ride a jumper that way (?). Oh well.

    I'm happy with the way my horse and I communicate, and my gf has a really good eye and knows what she's talking about when it comes to gaited horses, and she tweaks me every month or so. But it's more like "you're leaning", or "slow down", "stop looking down". Stuff we all need reminding of.

    I think with the owner of and the horse, they both seem to me to have a very big chunk of education missing. And the girl gets frustrated. I've gone as far as to say I'd pay for 6 dressage lessons (I like her). But she's selling the horse. I've never given her advice in riding aside from improving communication.

    Thanks for the input. It's helped me see things for what they are. I see now that there is nothing wrong with me (ha ha) and after all the years of my riding, I can certainly see that I can ride a horse nicely without an instructor standing there.
         
        02-13-2014, 11:53 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    I wonder how successful her students are...I am not against lessons at all, but I have found that it really pays to make sure I am getting lessons from someone that has successful students!

    Who wants to pay good money to an instructor that can't instruct? I agree, two years is way too long to still have a bolting problem.

    I think the instructor and the owner are both afaid of the horse.
         
        02-14-2014, 11:06 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    The dressage instructor is someone who comes weekly to give a few lessons.

    It may have gotten to the point where neither trusts the horse. I think a good trainer would have backed up and established communication between the two. I think of that is a telephone call. But both horse and rider scream into the phone or hang up, LOL. Horse and rider should have learned how to communicate with eachother prior to jumping.

    I don't say anything. I think they are all dependent on the instructor/BO and the missing block of education is what keeps them dependent. You think?

    Seems the horse is a good jumper and the girl is a good jumper, but if they can't communicate, where does that leave them?
    AnitaAnne likes this.
         
        02-18-2014, 12:35 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    New dilemma , same trainer.
    My gf's daughter wants to show my gaited horse at a schooling show in 2 weeks. Not a problem. The trainer said she'd help her. I thought well, I'll stay out of it. Trainer says she knows gaited horses. So the trainer gets in the ring with the girl, and it's been a long time since I've seen my horse go around with her nose in the air and a stiff neck. It was hideous. After 10 minutes, the trainer went into the house because she had a headache.

    I did say I wouldn't get involved. Well you know how long that lasted. The girl rides really well on other horses. She rode my horse months ago and she had my horse nice and soft.

    The trainer kept telling her to "bump" her back (?). I don't think my horse bumps very well.

    After trainer was gone, I said you want a nod. No nod, no flatwalk. Nod and ears flopping is the best flatwalk. Then I showed her how to soften the horse's neck and get her face more vertical. (I call it romancing the reins.) Okay, she got that. Next step is to get the soft, then use your seat and legs to keep her on the bit and in frame. The girl got to where she understood what it felt like when it was right.

    So now I don't know if I should stay out of it or not. Maybe I'll just tell her mother (my friend) what to say to her daughter.

    If you don't want to rock the boat at a boarding place, what should I do?
         
        02-18-2014, 01:16 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:

    If you don't want to rock the boat at a boarding place, what should I do?
    Don't talk to anyone, ever!!!!

    Lol it's the horse world, it's impossible to never ruffle any feathers.
         
        02-18-2014, 09:45 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    It's your horse right? So why let the "trainer" be involved at all? You need to speak up before these things happen, not after. When the trainer say "I'll help her" you just say "no thank you". End of discussion. No drama, no explaination, no rocking the boat, just "no thank you".

    Whenever I let someone ride my horse (rare occurance) I am right there with them, giving direction just like you did after the "trainer" left. After all, you know your horse better than anyone, don't you?

    The only time I ever let someone ride my horse in a lesson was when I had already paid for a lesson at a clinic, then hurt my arm the day before. The girl that rode my horse had never ridden him before, but was an experienced rider. Before our time slot, I had her up on the horse in another arena for about 15 minutes teaching her the aids to use to ride my horse.

    I might also add, what little you have said about this "trainer" sounds very, very strange. I have never had an instructor walk away from a lesson, for any reason. Of course, I would never take a lesson from anyone that I did not first watch giving lessons, usually in a clinic type situation. I would never throw lesson money away on a useless instructor.

    What about this "trainer" makes you willing to use her for anything? That is what I just don't understand...
         
        02-18-2014, 10:31 AM
      #19
    Yearling
    Good question.
    I don't let anyone get on my horse who is a bully or who doesn't have soft hands. Or a beginner. This girl rides nicely and treats her own horse like gold.

    The trainer is good with teaching jumping. Her students clean up at shows. She has many good qualities. But softening a horse may not be one of them. If the girl continues to be guided by this trainer, she will fail. A horse can't flatwalk with a stiff neck .

    I don't know how many of you know gaits. The major difference between them and trotting horses is that the horse needs to nod in time with the gait. The gait has 4 equally spaced foot falls. Like any horse's walk only with pushing the horse a bit, the walk is the same, but the speed is like a trot. These horses also get to the point where they flop their ears and some clack their teeth with the rhythm. The stride is longer with the back legs stepping more under the horse. This is all in a rounded frame.

    If you lift your hands, the horse inverts her roundness and racks which is a gait , 4 beat, but short steps. I guess I will be getting involved.
         
        02-18-2014, 12:23 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
    Good question.
    I don't let anyone get on my horse who is a bully or who doesn't have soft hands. Or a beginner. This girl rides nicely and treats her own horse like gold.

    The trainer is good with teaching jumping. Her students clean up at shows. She has many good qualities. But softening a horse may not be one of them. If the girl continues to be guided by this trainer, she will fail. A horse can't flatwalk with a stiff neck .

    I don't know how many of you know gaits. The major difference between them and trotting horses is that the horse needs to nod in time with the gait. The gait has 4 equally spaced foot falls. Like any horse's walk only with pushing the horse a bit, the walk is the same, but the speed is like a trot. These horses also get to the point where they flop their ears and some clack their teeth with the rhythm. The stride is longer with the back legs stepping more under the horse. This is all in a rounded frame.

    If you lift your hands, the horse inverts her roundness and racks which is a gait , 4 beat, but short steps. I guess I will be getting involved.
    Well, I am not an expert on gaits, but the nodding you are refering to only applies to "Walker-bred" type horses. The "Racking-bred" like my RMHA, don't nod their head because they don't do the running walk like a TW.

    I do work my Rocky in a round frame, because it actually improves his rack. If he hollows, he loses the quality of his rack and it gets choppy.

    As far as I am aware, the only horses that need to get hollow to rack are the ones where the gait is more developed, as opposed to being totally natural. Breeds like the Saddlebred (often bred to have a hollow back), Arabians & even Morgans.

    Are you wanting to use this trainer to win in jumping classes?

    Because, IMO, a hunter/jumper, even if not in a perfect hunter frame, will always place over a gaited horse jumping perfectly, and the trainer is going to matter less than the horse (this excluding any rails knocked down).
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    New and Clueless! mooselulu Meet the Community 5 03-21-2013 01:05 AM
    Clueless fkonidaris Barrel Racing 6 07-25-2012 10:29 AM
    Endurance for the Clueless Houston Endurance Riding 17 07-05-2012 08:23 PM
    Clueless about horse nutrition azhorseluvr1222 Horse Nutrition 8 01-11-2011 09:54 AM
    Fat, Green and Clueless Piper182 Horse Training 9 07-01-2009 11:20 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:37 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0