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Why do I feel so clueless?

This is a discussion on Why do I feel so clueless? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        02-18-2014, 06:05 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    You're right, it's only TWH's that nod.
    I'm not planning on doing any jumping.
    I guess I will be getting back in there. I think it's beneficial for the girl to learn basic softening a horse, and aids. I don't get on anyone's horse and ask the horse to do something if they are not relaxed and willing.

    Anita, it was not a formal lesson. And the trainer watched the girl ride around the ring stiffly, and said to me that " she knows the flat walk, now all she needs to learn is the running walk and she'll be ready." What a hoot!

    I think up until these 2 occurences, I thought she was a great trainer because of all the years of experience she had. I guess I thought she would be a better teacher.

    The trainer is a very nice lady who is very sick. I think what she's done is trained her students to jump well, but also be dependent on her. She's extremely knowledgeable about nutrition and illnesses.

    It's a nice place to board, it's all pasture board, and the barn is empty because the horses love being out all the time. They are very good to the horses. But yes, I've seen some issues that I may have handled differently. She has 2 yearling colts that won't stand for the farrier unless she is present. They don't lead well either unless it's her doing it. I don't know.

    Like Tempest said, I don't want to ruffle any feathers. It's a very small horse world here where I live.
         
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        02-18-2014, 10:03 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    Well, being very sick would explain leaving with a headache, sorry about that.

    So, I guess you were just trying to see if she could add anything to what you already know? Maybe the sickness, whatever it is (cancer?) is affecting her judgement. I'll go back to my earlier option, maybe she was really worried about you on the other horse, thinking it would bolt.

    If her sickness is affecting her judgement though, maybe she needs to quit teaching for a bit until she is better. You could offer to assist, if this is a "no charge" type lessons.

    Either way, yeah, it sounds like you have to get involved.

    Also, it sounds like it is a great place to board.
         
        02-19-2014, 09:04 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Thanks Anita, it's a beautiful place to board. All green all year.

    The lesson and show is going on the back burner for now. My horse had her dentist today and he found a big tooth that was split down the middle and filled with gook and smelly. He said she looks like she's had it for quite a while. He said the previous dentist may have missed it. But I don't think she's had it for a year. So on March 4th, they will come and do the surgery. $1,000 dollars. Then antibiotics. I wonder if she should wait 2 weeks? I don't think they can come any sooner. I'll ask the BO/trainer.

    With the other horse, some girl and her mom came to look at her Sunday. The girl could not manage her , and was told to get her legs off the horse. The horse did try to run off with her. I just feel that the horse needs to know what legs feel like, LOL.
         
        02-20-2014, 05:48 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    $1000 for one tooth? Jeez that is a lot of money!! It has been years since I had to have teeth pulled on a horse, but I am sure it was nowhere near that kind of $$$ and he had two wolf teeth pulled!

    Have you thought about calling around to some other vets and getting estimates? I doubt it should cost more than $100 if you trailer to the vets...
         
        02-20-2014, 06:20 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    From what they told me it's a lengthy procedure because they have to give the horse breaks from keeping her mouth open for so long. I think I should ask around. Thanks.
         
        02-20-2014, 10:47 PM
      #26
    Showing
    LOL, Anabel posted about the leg issue a while back and I believe the same thing that she posted. General thought is this: A horse that is touchy and flighty to the leg needs to have more leg used on them so they learn to relax and don't booger at it. Horses who are dull and slow to respond need to have virtually no leg used on them except to cue for something, that way, they stay responsive to the lightest aids.

    That sucks about your girls tooth, I hope the surgery goes well. It never hurts to ask around but a lot of the cost depends solely on your location. Around here, I could likely have the same procedure done for half the cost, but I live in a very rural area in a very unpopulated region. Almost everything is cheap around here (except gas, which sucks because you have to drive for almost an hour to get to anything LOL).
         
        02-21-2014, 10:50 AM
      #27
    Yearling
    I checked around and the price seems to be the average. I've also heard stories about the infection going into the sinus and costing a whole lot more.
         
        02-21-2014, 01:51 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    So, just out of curiosity, I want to call the vet that pulled my horse's wolf teeth many years ago. He is very good but very practical too.

    Can you tell me which tooth it is that needs to be pulled? I want to call & get an estimate, to compare prices/regions.
         
        02-22-2014, 09:03 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Sure, that's a great idea. It an upper molar, about midway back.
         
        02-23-2014, 12:28 AM
      #30
    Started
    Wolf teeth are far far more easy to remove. They are similar to the horse's chestnuts or a dog's dew claw -- vestiges of something their predecessors had. Because of this they are generally pretty small and their roots don't go very deep, making them fairly easy to remove.

    The molars on the other hand are very deeply rooted and it is a much more involved process to remove them. If the tooth is split, it can be even more complicated to try to get it all the way out as the tooth can break further into multiple pieces upon the attempt to extract it, and in "worst case" can snap off -- leaving a portion of the tooth root imbedded in the jaw, which in some cases then has to be removed using more invasive techniques. (I don't want to freak you out princessfluffybritches... I don't think these sorts of complications are very common, I'm just pointing out that removing a molar is on entirely different level than popping out a couple of wolf teeth.)
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