Winter riding and hooves
 
 

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Winter riding and hooves

This is a discussion on Winter riding and hooves within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        11-26-2010, 10:28 AM
      #1
    Green Broke
    Post Winter riding and hooves

    I wasnt sure where to put this, but here seemed most appropriate.
    I read that some people spray non-stick cooking spray in horses hooves. I was wondering if this is ok for their hoof. I would think it would dry out the frog? But it seems like a good idea for snow sticky hoofs.
    Thanks

    VB
         
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        11-26-2010, 10:50 AM
      #2
    Trained
    I always get snow pads put in my horse's shoes and this year I'm corking him too.
    I guess none of that would really work if your horse is barefoot :P I've always used vaseline, not Pam.
         
        11-26-2010, 11:32 AM
      #3
    Green Broke
    Yeah, we pull shoes for the winter. I will try Vaseline, thanks

    VB
         
        11-26-2010, 01:04 PM
      #4
    Foal
    We sprayed some PAM in our shoed horses last year...it seemed to work. I still double checked them at feed time and made sure they were making any ice balls. Luckily, they are all barefoot this year and our shoed horses will be inside most of the winter!
         
        11-26-2010, 01:17 PM
      #5
    Showing
    I don't want to start up another thread, but will my TB be okay in the snow? He has a full set of shoes and pads on front
         
        11-26-2010, 01:18 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    I have a question..

    Why do people pull off shoes in winter?
         
        11-26-2010, 01:25 PM
      #7
    Showing
    ^Shoes are only good in winter if combined with snowball pads and studs is what I've heard. I'm not sure what to do with my TB's then....pull their shoes or put studs and snowball pads on them? My one TB is lame constantly unless he has shoes.
         
        11-26-2010, 01:31 PM
      #8
    Foal
    Equiniphile- we had horses in the snow with shoes on for years, and they were just fine. You can ask your farrier if there is anything you could do to keep the ice balls limited. It sounds like vasaline and pam are good at keeping little to no build up in their hooves, that's what my farrier recommended and we had a terrible winter last year. You can also just pick their hooved frequently during snow if you can.
         
        11-26-2010, 02:34 PM
      #9
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wannahorse22    
    I have a question..

    Why do people pull off shoes in winter?
    There are multiple reasons. Ice balls are much worse in horses with shoes, so you have to be constantly vigilant if you're not using pads. Shoes on ice are unbelievably dangerous without proper studs/corks, smooth metal will slide 10x worse then a bare foot. Also, horses simply don't wear their hooves down in winter like they do in summer. They grow slower for one (believed to be because the keratin is going to growing the winter coat), and if you have a lot of snow, there often isn't a big problem with chipping and cracking in summer.

    And of course, a LOT of people either stop riding or ride way less in winter!
         
        11-26-2010, 02:42 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    I use hoof grease called cornacrusein and coat both inside and outside with it. It does help but we mostly walk with slight trotting in winter due to the danger underfoot.
    Wishing for an arena!!
         

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