Would You Buy A Horse That Killed It's Last Rider? - Page 4
 
 

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Would You Buy A Horse That Killed It's Last Rider?

This is a discussion on Would You Buy A Horse That Killed It's Last Rider? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        03-27-2011, 11:06 AM
      #31
    Trained
    As the previous owner of a horse that would rear and flip WEEKLY on the cross ties, I would never ever buy a horse that rears again. My old mare finally reared and flipped on me, luckily I lived, but it was a pretty close thing for awhile there, I was basically really really lucky. Gave the mare away to someone I thought would handle it well, the lady ended up breaking her pelvis and let her daughter ride the horse, girl ended up with a broke collar bone -she kept rearing and flipping with them too. The people ended up breeding her - havent heard anything since.

    I have ridden known rearers since then, but once they start flipping over, I agree with others, time to euthanize.
         
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        03-27-2011, 11:15 AM
      #32
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    I totaly agree with you, stan reared out of pain on me twice in 20 years,
    Sorry that should be 10 years! I only owned him 10 years!!
         
        03-27-2011, 11:24 AM
      #33
    Green Broke
    As a pasture pet, yes. Anything else, no.

    Considering I have small kids, not sure I'd even take one as a pasture pet though.
         
        03-27-2011, 11:46 AM
      #34
    Green Broke
    Wow yikes, your friend sounds like a spoiled brat that is going to get herself injured or KILLED. If she doesn't have the time or the experience to do this, then she shouldn't! And even if she did, if she were my daughter I would tell her HECK NO! Do her parents know that the horse killed its last rider? I would think that alone would deter any parent from buying a horse for their child, regardless of if they are horse people or not. Have you asked her trainer or barn owner to talk to her and to her parents? Maybe if an adult talks to the parents they will see how dangerous of a situation their daughter is potentially getting into.
         
        03-27-2011, 11:48 AM
      #35
    Weanling
    What. Is she. THINKING?

    What is wrong with this child? WHY does she want a horse who rears, let alone one who has killed a rider?! WHY?!

    This girl needs a slap upside the head, and that horse needs to be on the first truck off the farm to the slaughter house.

    There are far, FAR too many cheap, sane horses for sale in this economy to even consider taking one with problems-especially with only 4 years experience.
         
        03-27-2011, 11:59 AM
      #36
    dee
    Started
    At 16, she is romanticizing the situation. She is already picturing herself curing this horse of rearing by love alone - just like in the movies. She's not mature enough yet, apparently to pick a proper horse out for herself - she's obviously over estimating her abilities and experience.

    Not only would I warn her trainer about what she's up to, I would bluntly ask her parents if she has enough medical insurance to cover the inveitable serious injuries she will likely incurr, and enough life insurance to cover her funeral expenses in case the horse lives up to his reputation.

    If she's boarding her horses, or will be boarding, I would also tell the BO about the horse's past. I don't know of a responsible BO that would allow a horse like that on the property. The horse could hurt someone other than his dreamy eyed new owner, too.

    Sorry if I come across as too blunt - but I've seen too many parents who believe their kids were superriders that end up taking care of the kids for the rest of their lives due life altering injuries from horses they had no business on.
         
        03-27-2011, 12:15 PM
      #37
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Phantomcolt18    
    ...Also they don't have the time to put into the horse to train it out of rearing if it still rears...
    With that I would say NO to them getting the horse.

    However, to answer the original question of buying said horse, Yes.

    Our first horse was a rearer. We had no clue as to what to do to train him at all, even just the basics. With some luck and some good people, he has come along pretty well and so have we. Our latest horse has been known to be a horse that will pull back when tied, and rear and go over backwards. She has been that way since she was about 2 and now she's 16. We've had her less than a 1/2 year. She has never gone over backwards with a rider on. Mostly it's when she was tied and she pulled back enough that the tie down broke. With patience, work and understanding her, she also is coming out of it. Maybe chock it up to luck, but even if the horse has little or bad training, it can be fixed in time.
         
        03-27-2011, 01:04 PM
      #38
    Started
    You could not pay me to take this horse, even when I was 16(i had also been riding for 4 years at the point) I knew realistically even at 16 what I could and could not handle and there would be no way now or then(i'm 25 now) that I would take a horse with such a serious behavioral problem. I considered myself a decent rider back then, tho I had never had formal lessons, but a dangerous horse would be something I never would have considered. When I was 17/18 the office manager at the vet hospital I worked at was trying to sell me her 2 horses, I couldn't afford to but another horse so I declined, after a few months of not being able to sell them she gave me the one, Skip, she told me he was a great horse that anyone could ride so I took him. The truth was that he sat for 5 years and when I started working him he turned into a chronic bucker, checked saddle fit, had a chiropractor come out, had the vet check him, he had no soreness issues, he was just a straight out jerk, august 1 06 I got on him, I was in the process of mounting him when he bolted bucked and then reared, causing me to crack a rib on the saddle horn and then falling off knocking the wind out of me, then on august 30th at our local fair my friend Jamie(who is a very experienced rider) asked me to ride him, I was hesitant, but finally said ok, I called out sick from work, and we tacked up the horses(i on my old man Blue) Skip was doing pretty good when all of a sudden he went into a bucking fit, he bucked about 6 times before she finally fell off and landed in front of him, he ran over top of her kicking her in the head(where he helmet didn't cover) and breaking her hand, she ended up taking a helicopter ride the the nearest hospital with a trauma unit, she had a concussion but luckily she was for the most part ok. Jamie had been ridding for for over 10 years and she still couldn't handle Skip....
    She is going to get herself injured or killed if she thinks that she can train this horse, she is going to try to push him too hard too fast and he IS GOING to go over on her...Talk to her trainer, and hope that her parents actually listen to him, although I would think that her parents knowing the horse killed someone would be a red flag even if their daughter says she can handle the horse
         
        03-27-2011, 01:30 PM
      #39
    Started
    As a trainer myself, I would much rather deal with a horse that bucks, takes off, bites, has horrible ground manners, than one that rears. IMO its much easier to "cure" a horse from bucking, and much less dangerous than it is to "cure" a horse from rearing. Once or twice because of pain, or misunderstanding because I'm not asking something right is okay, I'll check it out, but if the horse has flipped over, even if he only reared once and flipped, definitely not, and if it rears every time someone rides it, then I would most definitely not.
    I'm currently working a 6 year old warmblood mare, that I believe was pushed to far too fast by the owners daughter (daughter has passed away, so I get bits and pieces of the story of what really went on), and she started by just stomping her back leg, twisting her head around, gnashing her teeth, and not going forward, then once she started going forward, and bucking/kicking out wasn't working to get out of work, she resorted to going up and almost over twice, and I SERIOUSLY got after her for that, and if she does it one more time I am going to have to politely tell the owner that I can not train her horse because of it. I will not put myself in that sort of position, and I am a little shocked that the owner is trying to sell the horse as ridable even with her disclosing that he is a rearer. I would get the trainer involved, let him know whats going on, and have him talk to the parents himself, but outside of that, I think that you have done everything you can to warn them off the horse, and tell them how dangerous it is. Its sad that they aren't listening to you, but unfortunately not to be harsh, they may need for the daughter to get injured before they will see reason, though even then they may just blame it on the horse. Even my parents who aren't particularly horsey people wouldn't have EVER allowed me to get a horse like that, and even now that I'm 26 and have my own training business, they would highly discourage my getting a horse or training a horse like that.
         
        03-27-2011, 03:59 PM
      #40
    Started
    Ugh sorry trying to figure out how to multi quote
         

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