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Young male, questions about starting...

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  • I dont want to wear breeches
  • Men in breeches look good or bad

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    04-22-2012, 08:39 PM
  #11
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Lad    
1) I don't really know how to talk to my parents about it? I know this is kind of silly, but I can imagine exactly when I tell them I would like to try riding that they will say "You want to learn to ride a horse?". I'm not trying to say my parents are unsupportive, they definitely aren't, but it will surprise them. Should I just muster the courage and say it straight?
As I've gotten older, I've learned that people often have definite expectations of how a conversation will go and the impression that other parties will have. I've also learned, that the expectations of those conversations are almost always pessimistic and incorrect. It's best to just say it straight, don't let nerves get to you and tell your parents you want to begin taking riding lessons. I doubt they'll think it's silly, they might be taken off guard and curious about what's driven your interest in horses though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Lad    
3) Being 17, should I go for adult only lessons? One place I was looking at does offer them, but I guess I would have to ask them whether I would count as an adult or not. I'd just rather avoid being in a group with what will probably be younger girls.
You're walking the line of adulthood but perhaps not quite there yet, if you're mature and can demonstrate that to the stable I doubt they'd have an issue placing you in group lessons with older people. I could be wrong.

I had the same concern about being in lessons with a group of 8 year old girls. My solution was to sign up for private lessons during the day, while the young kids are all still in school. At 17, you're probably in secondary school so that might not be an option.

I responded to the message you sent me.
     
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    04-22-2012, 09:32 PM
  #12
Trained
Being in England, you might find it difficult to locate a stable that teaches western on the stable's horses. You will probably find a few trainers that teach western, but it would be on the horses owned by the people paying for the lessons. That's my experience even here in Australia - english is all you can find most of the time. I also had the same experience in Northern Ireland when I was over there for a while.

Personally, I would start with English over there. The lessons will be cheaper because it is the more common of the two. The gear will be cheaper. The community will be larger. For a beginner, these are all good things.
bsms likes this.
     
    04-23-2012, 12:14 AM
  #13
Foal
17 p/h is relatively cheap, I'm not sure you'll be able to find any schools near you that teach western riding, so English is probably a given. There's no obligation to wear any particular clothes, though some places don't consider jeans suitable for riding.
     
    04-23-2012, 04:52 AM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
2- I live in Texas, so I don't know how many pounds this would amout to or if that's normal in your area, but group lessons where I live run at about $30-40 an hour, including tacking up. I'm an assistant instructor at the barn where I work and we charge $40 for a semi private lesson of two to three people. My advice to you would be to take private lessons though, if at all possible, for atleast the first 4-6 lessons just so that you can have that one on one help with learning how to balance yourself and control each part of your body differently.
This is a good idea that I hadn't thought of, thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
Speaking as a parent/grandparent, I LOVE it when one of my kids tells me what they are thinking. Most of my kids have followed my wife's example - and she assumes I've read her mind and know her thoughts. Trust me - I don't!
Okay, puts me at ease a bit. I'm not nervous that they'll say no, just that it will come as a surprise to them, as I've never done anything likes this before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrinkofSunshine    
I'm a beginner English rider and I don't really have any of the fancy clothes people show in. I ride in jeans (they are pretty tight, though!), a t-shirt and some mid-calf boots that weren't intended for riding, but they work just fine and look just like paddock boots .
Ahh okay, thanks for that. I was wondering whether it was an obligation in English riding to dress up in particular clothes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mind    
You're walking the line of adulthood but perhaps not quite there yet, if you're mature and can demonstrate that to the stable I doubt they'd have an issue placing you in group lessons with older people. I could be wrong.

I responded to the message you sent me.
Cheers mate. I'm a few months off 18 yet, but I figured I might be more comfortable taking lessons with some 30 year olds than some 12 year olds, if you know what I mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiilaa    
Being in England, you might find it difficult to locate a stable that teaches western on the stable's horses.
Yeah, I started to think the same thing, but it's fine with me. I had an incorrect misconception that English was only for people that wanted to do events and dressage, so it's cool with me

Thanks to everyone that took the time to post, I haven't quoted everybody and I've cut most people short. I will make sure I read all this through. Thanks again, very helpful
     
    04-23-2012, 09:11 AM
  #15
Green Broke
Outside of North America, there seems to be few "Western" style riding places. It's almost solely from that area, besides some limited interest groups in other countries. I've been riding for over 10 years and I have never seen a Western style riding school, or a western style event. I've never even sat in a Western saddle, and I'd love to, looks like fun but it just isn't common in Australia, and probably even less so in England.

Riding isn't just for competition. It's one of those things that takes a while to get good at, so you'd probably take lessons for a couple of years before you'd even consider learning competitive skills. Also, many riding schools aren't competitively geared, and if you want to ride for pleasure you shouldn't have a problem with that.

18 pounds sounds really good, I was paying $40AUD for an hour group adult lesson on school horses, which is about 25 pounds. Make sure the school is good though - it's worth paying more for better quality instruction and better horses. Even if you don't want to be competitive in the future, it's worth learning it the right way first.

You don't have to wear breeches/jodhpurs, I know I never to just because they cost so much! You can get away with some jeans, or even exercise type pants? Good boots are more important than pants.

It's dangerous, but the risk on riding school horses is relatively minimal.

Keep us updated!
     
    04-23-2012, 01:31 PM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia    
Outside of North America, there seems to be few "Western" style riding places. It's almost solely from that area, besides some limited interest groups in other countries. I've been riding for over 10 years and I have never seen a Western style riding school, or a western style event. I've never even sat in a Western saddle, and I'd love to, looks like fun but it just isn't common in Australia, and probably even less so in England.
Yeah, when I found out that English isn't exclusively for those that want to compete, I have no problem learning that


Quote:
18 pounds sounds really good, I was paying $40AUD for an hour group adult lesson on school horses, which is about 25 pounds. Make sure the school is good though - it's worth paying more for better quality instruction and better horses. Even if you don't want to be competitive in the future, it's worth learning it the right way first.
Yeah, for the hour I thought it seemed okay, even though the group could get as big as 8. Like another poster said though, I may consider taking a few private lessons to start and then move to group.

Quote:
You don't have to wear breeches/jodhpurs, I know I never to just because they cost so much! You can get away with some jeans, or even exercise type pants? Good boots are more important than pants.
After reading the articles provided by Cinder, I have to say...breeches and jodhpurs don't actually look that bad I guess what put me off was the riding 'coats' I've seen people in, which seemed quite elaborate and linked to eventing. Jodhpurs seemed practical though, which is cool with me. After all, it's all in context.

Quote:
It's dangerous, but the risk on riding school horses is relatively minimal.

Keep us updated!
I read through an article on safety provided by another poster, and although some of it was a little unnerving, I doubt I would ever be doing anything dangerous with an instructor. I have no doubt I'd fall at some point, but that's just something you have to get over really.

Thanks for your help, I reckon I'll do some more investigating about places to learn (perhaps ask my cousin who used to ride herself) and then pluck up the courage to speak to my parents...
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
    04-23-2012, 03:44 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Yeah, for the hour I thought it seemed okay, even though the group could get as big as 8. Like another poster said though, I may consider taking a few private lessons to start and then move to group.
That's a good idea, or you could try to find a place that teaches hour-long semi-private lessons.That's what I take new and I find them just about perfect. Eight people can be a bit crowded, especially in a small arena.

Quote:
I read through an article on safety provided by another poster, and although some of it was a little unnerving, I doubt I would ever be doing anything dangerous with an instructor. I have no doubt I'd fall at some point, but that's just something you have to get over really.

Thanks for your help, I reckon I'll do some more investigating about places to learn (perhaps ask my cousin who used to ride herself) and then pluck up the courage to speak to my parents...
It depends on what you define as "dangerous", .

There's a saying that you aren't a true equestrian until you've fallen ten times :).

Maybe show your parents this thread if you're nervous? I bet they'd be impressed with your curiosity!
     
    04-23-2012, 04:04 PM
  #18
Green Broke
You brought up dangerous and you also play sports. Most sports are every bit as dangerous as horse back riding. Maybe even worse, while I do know people that have been seriously hurt by horses I know far more that go through life complaining about how their old sports injuries are bothering them.
     
    04-23-2012, 04:57 PM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinder    
That's a good idea, or you could try to find a place that teaches hour-long semi-private lessons.That's what I take new and I find them just about perfect. Eight people can be a bit crowded, especially in a small arena.

It depends on what you define as "dangerous", .

There's a saying that you aren't a true equestrian until you've fallen ten times :).

Maybe show your parents this thread if you're nervous? I bet they'd be impressed with your curiosity!
I thought 8 might be a bit crowded, but it all comes back round to money aha. I hadn't thought about showing them what I had asked on here; that's actually a good idea that proves to them this isn't an impulsive thing and that I have done some research, asked questions etc

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin    
You brought up dangerous and you also play sports. Most sports are every bit as dangerous as horse back riding. Maybe even worse, while I do know people that have been seriously hurt by horses I know far more that go through life complaining about how their old sports injuries are bothering them.
Well I used to play football (what many of you might call 'soccer') which isn't really classed as a 'dangerous' sport. Sure I had some pretty nasty moments and injuries, but nothing I would consider close to falling from a horse. You're right though, horse riding is not alone in having an element of risk.

Thanks again guys, very helpful and have answered my questions.
     
    04-23-2012, 07:21 PM
  #20
Banned
Most falls from horseback end up with nothing worse than a bruise.

Some of them incur broken bones or separated or dislocated joints.

No different than contact sports.
     

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