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Young male, questions about starting...

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        04-24-2012, 05:50 PM
      #31
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by phoenix    
    If you're worried about the cost/your parents might be worried about the cost you could try spreading the lessons out, say once every 2 weeks.

    Good luck!
    I hadn't thought of this, but I think weekly would be much better. I could consider the smaller groups of 4, and hopefully put some money towards it. Ideally get a job actually. And thanks a lot

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    Keep us updated :) I used to live in England
    Will do!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jinxremoving    
    I guess what I'm getting at is when you do take lessons, never let up your guard even when you're sitting around doing nothing. You will fall at some point as you already know, just keep your arms in and try and curl up into a ball. Whatever you do, don't try and catch yourself because that's a sure fire way to break something. I also wouldn't worry about falling or getting hurt. The way I see it, I could be killed crossing the road or have a meteorite fall out of the sky and take me out. As long as you're not reckless and keep your wits about you, you'll be OK. :)
    That's a pretty tragic story You make good points though, you just have to be as safe as you can. We can't let fear of accidents that haven't happened run our lives, right?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AlexS    
    Are you comfortable sharing which county you are in? There's lot's of Brits and ex pats here who might be able to recommend somewhere for you.
    UK, but I've already found places pretty close to me. I will also ask my cousin and friend where they both rode, thanks

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Stoddard    
    English, no matter which way you go, is excellent to try. I suggest learning at least the basics of English before trying anything else. Why? Because there's no cheating balance. You don't have a saddle horn to clutch to, and there's a lot of other things to learn. Western is good for it's own reasons. For me, it's too keep in check to not pull on the bit so hard because leverage bits will make a horse go ape**** if you're tugging on them.
    It will be English because of where I am, but that's fine with me, it sounds great :) Thanks again guys.
         
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        04-24-2012, 06:43 PM
      #32
    Weanling
    You seem to have covered most of what you need to get started, and pretty impressed with the organisation tbh... but one thing I will say is that private lessons are all very well and good, and you probably get more individual time and help, I would always suggest group lessons for beginners.

    As an assistant instructor myself, the thing about group lessons is that there is a feeling of camaraderie (especially teaching adults). You get to compare your progression with people around you to a degree, and you can see what other people are doing and see the different styles of riding. Hearing what other people are doing wrong helps keep you in check too! Plus, when you're new to the sport, and half hour (or longer) private lesson is very intense, and muscles not used to it can complain a lot. It's also a long time to concentrate without a break, which riding with others gives you as you each take turns, but you're still getting the horse time that helps you develop your position etc. Just something to consider. But I'd agree with the adult lessons - people over about 16 tend to progress very differently from those who are younger, quicker in some areas but slower in others, so I;d recommend adult group lessons if you can.

    I'm UK too, and btw, 18 quid is a very decent rate I'd say. You're usually looking 20-25 quid for an hour group of half hour private, certainly in horsier areas or more touristy ones, and that's without investing in a helmet (30+ for a semi-decent one, but most good ones look in around 50-100), jodhpurs (you can get cheap, low quality ones online for 10, but tack shops you're looking probably 20+) and boots (from 30-40 for cheaper, rubber type long boots or jodhpur boots, and much more for leather long boots...). It's an expensive game, I'm afraid. I tend to put it on a par with skiing - probably the same kind of risk level, as in more than most sports but not too bad if you're sensible of your skill level and have a good instructor, and both aren't exactly cheap sports... However, all you need to get started is a pair of walking-type boots, a pair of jeans and a warm jumper, most riding schools have hats you can use for the first few session while you try it out.

    I hope you enjoy it, it's a great sport and whilst it can be tough to begin with, especially as an older person learning to ride (even by late teens people are never quite as fearless as the kids are!), it's the most amazing feeling when you get it right. And whilst you say you don't want to compete, and I'd agree that's a good attitude to have for now, don't rule it out - if you catch the bug, you may be desperate to by this time next year! Especially if you are a sporty person already, we tend to have a bit of a competitive streak... and there's nothing like the exhilaration of a cross country course for example.

    Good luck, and enjoy yourself! Don't worry about the parents, you may be surprised by the reaction and if not, let them them see what the sport is really about, and how tough and athletics you have to be!
         
        04-25-2012, 11:54 AM
      #33
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by minstrel    
    You seem to have covered most of what you need to get started, and pretty impressed with the organisation tbh... but one thing I will say is that private lessons are all very well and good, and you probably get more individual time and help, I would always suggest group lessons for beginners.
    I don't think I have much of a choice as to whether it's group or private, I don't have the money for private lessons sadly. Interesting points about group lessons though, ta.

    Quote:
    I'm UK too, and btw, 18 quid is a very decent rate I'd say.... However, all you need to get started is a pair of walking-type boots, a pair of jeans and a warm jumper, most riding schools have hats you can use for the first few session while you try it out.
    Well that's just one place that is pretty close to me, there are probably others I could compare with it. That's good to hear though.

    Quote:
    I hope you enjoy it, it's a great sport and whilst it can be tough to begin with, especially as an older person learning to ride (even by late teens people are never quite as fearless as the kids are!), it's the most amazing feeling when you get it right. And whilst you say you don't want to compete, and I'd agree that's a good attitude to have for now, don't rule it out - if you catch the bug, you may be desperate to by this time next year! Especially if you are a sporty person already, we tend to have a bit of a competitive streak... and there's nothing like the exhilaration of a cross country course for example.
    Thanks a lot. I will hopefully be able to take part in an adult lesson, because I would feel much more comfortable with a group of 20 to 30 year olds than a class of 10 to 14 year olds. I'm sure the places would appreciate that as well, as I'm almost an adult by law

    Quote:
    Good luck, and enjoy yourself! Don't worry about the parents, you may be surprised by the reaction and if not, let them them see what the sport is really about, and how tough and athletics you have to be!
    Cheers for the really good post. My only concern is the cost really, but if I have to go in a group of (up to) 8, then so be it. Hopefully I can sort something better out but we'll see; thanks.
         
        04-26-2012, 05:20 PM
      #34
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsesandhockey    
    since you're just starting, you'd probably be in a western saddle right away. That's how we start where I take lessons until you master your balance and seat. Peraonally, I prefer western and im the only one out of my friends who does. Especially since you're not interested in showing, i'd reccomend western. The saddles are much more convenient for trail rides.
    Thanks for the advice but if I do start, it will most likely be English. I can't see Western being particularly big around my area, thanks though
         

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