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Halter Fitting

This is a discussion on Halter Fitting within the Horse Showmanship forums, part of the Showing Horses category
  • Results of feeding halter weanlings grow colt
  • Fitting weanlings for halter

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    10-03-2012, 08:51 PM
  #41
Yearling
Oh I am so excited! Tomorrow I will go out and lunge him and put another blanket on (gosh it's gotten cold out!), and touch up his mane. Friday we leave for MJ. I have work booked off tomorrow and friday. I just can't wait! I almost want to go out now but there is no one here to feed the cat in the morning lol!
     
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    10-03-2012, 08:59 PM
  #42
Green Broke
Hope you'll be able to post pictures after the show. Best of luck.
     
    10-17-2012, 06:43 PM
  #43
Yearling
Thanksgiving Appaloosa Show
     
    10-18-2012, 12:04 PM
  #44
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Back2Horseback    
What I have learned is that sweet feed and most any form of oat/"cereal" grain has been found to be non-adventitious in all ways to horses...who knew??:0)

Recently, however, it has been found that cereal grains are the cause of over 20 previously non-understood equine dietary/other nutritionally based problems and basic concerns of previously unknown etiology.
Hi - can you point me in the direction of this information please.

I am a traditional feeder - mine get Barley, Oats, Suagarbeet, Flaxseed and Chaff and in over 40 years of feeding this to mine and to the horses in my care (100's) have never had a problem with this diet. What I have seen is the effect processed feeds have had on horses that are in the care of others. I firmly believe that the newly found problems are the result of the rubbish that gets put in the processed feeds.

Back to the OP's questions.

A young horse of anybreed needs protien for muscle development and Carbohydrates for growth and energy. Both are best supplied by good quality grazing, and quality hay if grazing is light. Hard feeding youngsters is not a good idea, growth problems develop from over feeding of hard feeds. Feed just a balancer to supply the exta protien required.

My youngsters all graze 24/7 with the addition of a multi mineral block they can freely access in their paddock. This is a photo of one of my yearlings that did not receive any hardfeed until she was a three year old - she is now 17hh at 4


Your horse is a lovely typical young horse that will go through a gangly stage from time to time. As a youngster judges should not be penalising a lighter weight - it is far better for a young horse to be light in condition - heavy condition will damage developing joints.

Sweats do not work! You cannot physically change a horses shape by putting on sweats - you just make their life uncomfortable.

Work wise - A horse of two cannot be worked long enough to improve muscle tone to any degree. 10 mins max lunging a day will do little to improve muscle structure. Any more than 10 mins and you risk damaging joints. Lead out in hand and walk for a few miles every day followed by quality grooming, around one hour body brushing. You could then get this One of my youngsters many years ago that was walked & strapped daily - notice the muscle definition


Regular worming is very important for youngsters. Mine are wormed every 8 weeks with a wormer that contains both Ivermectin and Praziquontal. Any sign of a snotty nose or a cough and I worm them as round worm migrate through the throat and lungs.

For extra healthy shine feed up to 1 cup of fresh ground flaxseed daily. I use a coffee grinder to grind the seeds fresh each day. You not only get the benefit of the oils for the coat but also for the joints too.

Remember all along that he is a baby and keep all lessons/work short.

Keeping a cover on him 24/7 will help to keep his colour and avoid those dry look ends and fading.
xxdanioo likes this.
     
    10-18-2012, 02:44 PM
  #45
Yearling
Thank you for your input!

This summer Walter was in pasture for about a month and a half, and then I brought him in a for a show. He hurt himself. Kept him in. Then figured I would keep him in to get ready for the show we just had.

We fed him sweet feed, oats and Equine Power which has flax and canola in it, and 24/7 access to hay. The last month or so before he was going through a huge growth spurt and was looking ribby, so we switched feed to oats, a finishing product with a lot of protein in it, and kept the Equine Power. He grew so fast his knees got wobbly- the tendons didn't grow as fast so they kinda wobble when he is standing.

I lunged him Saturday's and Sunday's as those were the days I was at the farm. I think we turned out well for the show. We are working on building knowledge and getting ready for the next breed show in May.

I haven't used any sweats, his neck looks pretty lovely I think! There are pictures of him in the new thread I posted from the show. :)
     
    10-18-2012, 02:56 PM
  #46
Green Broke
This is my second try - apparently the other disappeared into cyberspace.


Well done xxdanioo (I was wondering how you two did)!!! Walter looks quite the professional...
xxdanioo likes this.
     
    10-19-2012, 07:19 AM
  #47
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tnavas    
Hi - can you point me in the direction of this information please.

I am a traditional feeder - mine get Barley, Oats, Suagarbeet, Flaxseed and Chaff and in over 40 years of feeding this to mine and to the horses in my care (100's) have never had a problem with this diet. What I have seen is the effect processed feeds have had on horses that are in the care of others. I firmly believe that the newly found problems are the result of the rubbish that gets put in the processed feeds.

Back to the OP's questions.

A young horse of anybreed needs protien for muscle development and Carbohydrates for growth and energy. Both are best supplied by good quality grazing, and quality hay if grazing is light. Hard feeding youngsters is not a good idea, growth problems develop from over feeding of hard feeds. Feed just a balancer to supply the exta protien required.

My youngsters all graze 24/7 with the addition of a multi mineral block they can freely access in their paddock. This is a photo of one of my yearlings that did not receive any hardfeed until she was a three year old - she is now 17hh at 4


Your horse is a lovely typical young horse that will go through a gangly stage from time to time. As a youngster judges should not be penalising a lighter weight - it is far better for a young horse to be light in condition - heavy condition will damage developing joints.

Sweats do not work! You cannot physically change a horses shape by putting on sweats - you just make their life uncomfortable.

Work wise - A horse of two cannot be worked long enough to improve muscle tone to any degree. 10 mins max lunging a day will do little to improve muscle structure. Any more than 10 mins and you risk damaging joints. Lead out in hand and walk for a few miles every day followed by quality grooming, around one hour body brushing. You could then get this One of my youngsters many years ago that was walked & strapped daily - notice the muscle definition


Regular worming is very important for youngsters. Mine are wormed every 8 weeks with a wormer that contains both Ivermectin and Praziquontal. Any sign of a snotty nose or a cough and I worm them as round worm migrate through the throat and lungs.

For extra healthy shine feed up to 1 cup of fresh ground flaxseed daily. I use a coffee grinder to grind the seeds fresh each day. You not only get the benefit of the oils for the coat but also for the joints too.

Remember all along that he is a baby and keep all lessons/work short.

Keeping a cover on him 24/7 will help to keep his colour and avoid those dry look ends and fading.
Sweats DO work as I have used them before with much success. When I haltered a few of my horses, I did lots of long trotting...like ponying for the ones that weren't broke to ride yet. You can get a youngster in shape with longeing.

I noticed your horses are English types being shown In-Hand, it's different with the stock horse breeds such as the OP's.
TaraBearaIsBack likes this.
     
    10-19-2012, 10:30 AM
  #48
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
Sweats DO work as I have used them before with much success. When I haltered a few of my horses, I did lots of long trotting...like ponying for the ones that weren't broke to ride yet. You can get a youngster in shape with longeing.

I noticed your horses are English types being shown In-Hand, it's different with the stock horse breeds such as the OP's.
My cousin sweats her yearling mares neck, I think it has made a difference. Definitely trimmed it up.
     
    10-19-2012, 11:42 AM
  #49
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
Sweats DO work as I have used them before with much success. When I haltered a few of my horses, I did lots of long trotting...like ponying for the ones that weren't broke to ride yet. You can get a youngster in shape with longeing.

I noticed your horses are English types being shown In-Hand, it's different with the stock horse breeds such as the OP's.
You may very well be able to get a young horse into shape by lunging but it is an unwise thing to do. If you want the horse to last more than a few years you don't stress developing limbs by lunging the amount required to get a horse fit.

While you may think 'sweats' work - they don't - if they did every overweight person would be running around in them. They just make the horse uncomfortable.

While the method of showing inhand is different the presentation of the horse is the same.
     
    10-19-2012, 12:08 PM
  #50
Started
Well from experience on showing halter horses yes sweating the neck does work! & routinely practiced.People wouldn't be wasting their time doing it if it didn't work & how do you think those big chubby halter horses still have nice necks?? As alot of those feeds seem to like to go straight to the neck
GotaDunQH and TaraBearaIsBack like this.
     

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