Bit Help! - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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Location: Oklahoma
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Bit Help!

I have a question about bits.
Now, I have always used French Link Snaffles with my horses, especially my young horses, because I love them to have & keep a soft mouth. I even used a rubber happy mouth french link with my last young Trakehner.

I have used Elevator bits with a Thoroughbred I did Jumpers with, because without it he got especially heavy on the forehand and ran through aids.

The horse I have now, has been ridden in a plain jointed snaffle.
When he drops and stretches down, he becomes very soft. But when he is fighting me, he puts his head right in the air and braces against my hands with the underside of his neck. (Something he's done since before I got him.)
I want to move to a stronger bit, but want to stay with a type of snaffle.
I hate using any other type of bit, unless it is in instance with the Thoroughbred, who absolutely needs it.

Is anyone familiar with a Boucher bit? I was looking into the French Link Boucher Bit.

Thank you!

...he's so kissable, huggable, loveable, unbelievable...
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post #2 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 04:46 PM Thread Starter
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Or of course if anyone has any suggestions as far as a bit to try.

...he's so kissable, huggable, loveable, unbelievable...
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post #3 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 05:05 PM
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I like pelhams, personally. Haven't been using one long, but have heard good things about how they 'enlighten' the horse, get's them off forehand, etc.

Most people are like Slinkies; they serve no real purpose, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.
When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on for dear life.
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post #4 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 08:11 PM
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First off:
- How long ago were his teeth floated? Who were they floated by?
- Does your saddle fit, and was it fitted by a saddle fitter?
- Does your bridle fit properly?
- Are you a heavy-handed rider or more of a seat rider?
- Does the horse have any other problems, i.e. not bending, picking up uncorrect leads, etc?
- Has the horse seen a chiropractor?

I ask these questions before I even get into bits because a lot of the time the bit isn't the issue, rather there is an underlying problem.


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post #5 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
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He has no other issues, has just had his teeth floated by our dentist, and the saddle does fit him, I just bought it especially for him.

I have tried to be very light with my hands, and that is how I've always ridden.

It is no other issue than the bit, and he had been ridden by a very heavy-handed rider prior (Which is where his 'evasion' came from.)

I am a seat/leg rider, and I don't like to use hard hands at all, which is why I want to stick to a Snaffle bit still with him. I just need something with a little more to it than the plain jointed snaffle.

...he's so kissable, huggable, loveable, unbelievable...
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post #6 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 10:30 PM
Green Broke
 
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Boucher is no "stronger" than a d ring. If you want something stronger, try a Myler D-ring with hooks and a forward tilt low-port mouth. That will give you a soft mouth piece, but a tiny amount of leverage with the hooks and very low port.
Myler Forward Tilt Ported Barrel "D" Ring Bit

Have you tried a french link loose ring or egg butt? If you have one in your tack box, try that before buying another bit. You might be surprised on the amount of control you'll have with it.

I'd also have the horse's mouth looked at by a vet. Have his teeth floated if needed, and his wolf teeth pulled if he has any.
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post #7 of 10 Old 07-26-2009, 10:35 PM
Green Broke
 
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Also, make sure that when the horse evades by lifting his head, your hands should go up as well, to follow the contact. Bracing your hands down will only make him fight more. Just keep your arms and shoulders relaxed, keep a steady contact with his mouth, and wait him out.
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post #8 of 10 Old 08-13-2009, 01:22 AM
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Trakehners r da bomb!

A stubborn horse walks behind you, an impatient horse walks in front of you, but a noble companion walks beside you.
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post #9 of 10 Old 08-13-2009, 09:04 PM
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^ What?

Most people are like Slinkies; they serve no real purpose, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.
When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on for dear life.
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post #10 of 10 Old 08-14-2009, 01:28 PM
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I am assuming you are talking about your Morgan gelding. I always rode him in a eggbutt snaffle and or d ring. I had shown him in a double bridle. From what I understand people who train and ride dressage do not use any type of aid. So I do not know if you would like to try this... ride in any plain snaffle have a top rein with direct connection and get a drawrein and use it as your bottom rein. You can keep a light contact with him by doing this, but when he wants to bring his head up and try and get away from the bridle you have the extra support from keeping him from doing this. As he starts to put his head up bring him into a circle and it may keep him from doing this. I had rode him maybe right before you had bought him and he tried doing this to me as well. IMO I think he somewhere along the line got scared and didn't have a rider to give him direction. He didn't do anything like this when I had owned him. If you don't want to use any type of aid with him, I would just work him like you normaly and as he starts to come up bring him into a small circle and work your way out back to the rail or what ever you may be doing with him. I think he will come around quick and he is so smart and such a sweet guy. I hope you find something to work for you.
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